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Slide 2 Welcome to Presentation Plus! Presentation Plus! Civics Today Copyright by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Send all inquiries to: GLENCOE DIVISION Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8787 Orion Place Columbus, Ohio 43240 Slide 3 Splash Screen Slide 4 3 Contents Chapter Introduction Section 1Who Can Vote? Section 2Election Campaigns Section 3Paying for Election Campaigns Review to Learn Chapter Assessment Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides. Slide 5 4 Chapter Intro 1 Chapter Overview In Chapter 10 you learn about voting and elections. Section 1 focuses on voting. Section 2 discusses political campaigns. Section 3 examines how candidates pay for election campaigns. Slide 6 5 Chapter Intro 2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter Objectives After studying this chapter, you will be able to: Explain who can vote, voter registration, and how to vote. List steps in the campaign process. Identify how campaign money is spent and where it comes from. Slide 7 Chapter Intro 3 Click the Speaker button to replay the audio. Slide 8 End of Intro Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide. Slide 9 8 Section 1-1 Guide to Reading After meeting the qualifications, people who want to vote must register before going to the polling place to cast their ballots. polling place Main Idea Key Terms precinct ballot absentee ballot returns exit poll electorate apathy Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Slide 10 9 Section 1-2 Guide to Reading (cont.) Sequencing Information As you read, complete a chart like the one on page 236 of your textbook by listing the steps in the voting process. How has the right to vote expanded? Reading Strategy Read to Learn How does the registration and voting process work? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Slide 11 10 Section 1-3 Click the Speaker button to replay the audio. Pointing the way to the polling place Slide 12 11 Section 1-4 Qualifying to Vote Voting is the right to choose who will run the government. It is also a civic responsibility. If you dont vote, you hand over your share of political power to other voters who may not share your views. In the nations early years, most voters were white, adult male property owners. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 236237) Slide 13 12 Section 1-5 Qualifying to Vote (cont.) Today the Constitution forbids any state to deny the right to vote because of race, color, gender, or age (if the person is at least 18 years old). An exception is a person in prison. To be eligible to vote, you must be at least 18, a resident of the state for a specified time, and a U.S. citizen. In most states, you must also be registered to vote. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 236237) Slide 14 13 Section 1-6 You must register by the deadline set by your state. You can register in person at a county office. In some states, you may register by mail. The National Voter Registration Act allows voters to register when they renew their drivers licenses. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Qualifying to Vote (cont.) (pages 236237) Slide 15 14 Section 1-7 Registration forms ask your name, address, age, and often your party preference. If you register as a Republican or Democrat, you may participate in primary elections. You must prove citizenship, address, and age by showing your drivers license or birth certificate. You will be assigned to a district. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Qualifying to Vote (cont.) (pages 236237) Slide 16 15 Section 1-8 When you go to vote, election officials will check for your name on a list of voters registered in the district. Qualifying to Vote (cont.) (pages 236237) Slide 17 16 Section 1-9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. When you go to the polls, why do election officials look for your name on a list? Your name on the list verifies that you are registered and eligible to vote. It also prevents you from voting more than once. Qualifying to Vote (cont.) (pages 236237) Slide 18 17 Section 1-10 Steps in Voting To vote, you go to the polling place, a location in your precinct, or voting district. You fill out and sign an application form at the clerks table. The clerk reads your name aloud and passes your application to a challengers table. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 237239) Slide 19 18 Section 1-11 The challenger looks up your registration form and compares your signature to the one on your application. If they do not appear to match, the challenger may ask for more identification. When convinced, the challenger initials your application. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 237239) Steps in Voting (cont.) Slide 20 19 Section 1-12 Steps in Voting (cont.) You go to the voting booth and hand the application to an election judge, who makes sure everyone can vote in secret and helps people with special needs. A ballot is the paper you use to cast your vote. It lists the candidates names according to their party and the office they are seeking. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 237239) Slide 21 20 Section 1-13 You cast your ballot by using a voting machine. The type of machine varies from state to state. With one type you punch a hole next to a candidates name. With another type you use a lever. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Steps in Voting (cont.) (pages 237239) Slide 22 21 Section 1-14 People away from home or too sick to get to the polls on Election Day can vote by absentee ballot. They mark the ballot and return it by mail. When polls close, election workers count the votes and take the ballots and returns, or results, to the election board. The election board compiles the count for the city or county. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Steps in Voting (cont.) (pages 237239) Slide 23 22 Section 1-15 A few days later, the state canvassing authority certifies the winner. News media and party workers conduct exit pollsasking voters leaving the polls how they voted. Specialists use the results to predict winners early. Television networks may announce winners before voters in Western time zones have voted. Critics charge that early calls may persuade many Westerners not to vote. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Steps in Voting (cont.) (pages 237239) Slide 24 23 Section 1-16 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How can early predictions of winners affect the voting in Western states? Television networks often make early calls when millions of Americans in the Western time zones have yet to vote and the polls are still open. Such early projections may persuade great numbers of Westerners not to vote. This not only reduces overall voter turnout but also may affect the results of local, state, and congressional elections. Steps in Voting (cont.) (pages 237239) Slide 25 24 Section 1-17 Why Your Vote Matters Sources of information about candidates and issues include newspapers, TV, radio, newsmagazines, and the Internet. Others include literature distributed by political parties, the League of Women Voters, and interest groups. All people who are eligible to vote are called the electorate. Each vote counts. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 239240) Slide 26 25 Section 1-18 Why Your Vote Matters (cont.) Some people dont vote because they think no candidates represent their interests or think their vote will not matter. Another reason is apathy, or lack of interest. Citizens who vote share common characteristics. They generally have positive attitudes toward government and citizenship. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 239240) Slide 27 26 Section 1-19 Regular voters tend to be more educated, be middle-aged, and have higher incomes. Voting gives citizens a chance to choose their government leaders. If they are dissatisfied with past performances, they can elect new leaders. By voting they can also express their opinions on public issues. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 239240) Why Your Vote Matters (cont.) Slide 28 27 Section 1-20 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Why should you read information about candidates and issues carefully? Information in print and other media help you stay informed so that you can vote wisely. However, you must read carefully to separate facts from opinions. Much of the literature comes from political parties and other groups that have an interest in persuading you to vote a certain way. (pages 239240) Why Your Vote Matters (cont.) Slide 29 28 Section 1-21 Checking for Understanding __ 1.a geographic area that contains a specific number of voters __ 2.all the people who are eligible to vote __ 3.the list of candidates on which you cast your vote __ 4.a lack of interest __ 5.ballots and results of an election A.precinct B.ballot C.returns D.electorate E.apathy Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. D B A E C Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Slide 30 29 Section 1-22 Checking for Understanding (cont.) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Explain How did the Motor Voter Act affect voter registration in the United States? The Motor Voter Act allowed people to register to vote w

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