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Network Communication by Nader F Mir Solution Manual

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  • SOLUTIONS MANUAL FORCOMPUTER AND COMMUNICATIONNETWORKS

    Nader F. Mir

    Upper Saddle River, NJ . Boston . Indianapolis . San Francisco . New YorkToronto . Montreal . London . Munich . Paris . Madrid . CapetownSydney . Tokyo . Singapore . Mexico City

  • The author and publisher have taken care in the preparation of this book, but make no expressed or implied warranty of anykind and assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. No liability is assumed for incidental or consequential damagesin connection with or arising out of the use of the information or programs contained herein.

    Visit us on the Web: www.prenhallprofessional.com

    Copyright 2007 by Pearson Education, Inc.

    This work is protected by United States copyright laws and is provided solely for the use of instructors in teaching theircourses and assessing student learning. Dissemination or sale of any part of this work(including on the World Wide Web)will destroy the integrity of the work and is not permitted. The work and materials from it should never be made available tostudents except by instructors using the accompanying text in their classes. All recipients of this work are expected to abideby these restrictions and to honor the intended pedagogical purposes and the needs of other instructors who rely on thesematerials.

    ISBN 0-13-234570-6

    First release, March 2007

  • Contents

    Preface ii

    0.1 How to Obtain Errata of Text-Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

    0.2 Errors in This Solution Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

    0.3 How to Obtain an Updated Solution Manual . . . . . . . . . iii

    0.4 How to Contact Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv

    About the Author v

    I Fundamental Concepts 1

    1 Packet-Switched Networks 3

    2 Foundation of Networking Protocols 9

    3 Networking Devices 15

    4 Data Links and Transmission 21

    5 Local-Area Networks and Networks of LANs 29

    6 Wireless Networks and Mobile IP 35

    7 Routing and Inter-Networking 41

    8 Transport and End-to-End Protocols 51

    i

  • ii CONTENTS

    9 Applications and Network Management 57

    10 Network Security 67

    II Advanced Concepts 73

    11 Packet Queues and Delay Analysis 75

    12 Quality-of-Service and Resource Allocation 89

    13 Networks in Switch Fabrics 101

    14 Optical Switches and Networks, and WDM 121

    15 Multicasting Techniques and Protocols 123

    16 VPNs, Tunneling, and Overlay Networks 133

    17 Compression of Digital Voice and Video 135

    18 VoIP and Multimedia Networking 149

    19 Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks 155

    20 Wireless Sensor Networks 157

  • Preface

    An updated version of the solution manual is hereby provided to instructors.

    For any problem marked with N/A, the solution will be provided in the

    upcoming versions. Please check with the publisher or the author time-

    to-time to obtain the latest verion of the solution manual. For eective

    educational learning purposes, instructors are kindly requested not to allow

    any student to access this solution manual.

    0.1 How to Obtain Errata of Text-Book

    The Errata of the text-book, Edition 1, is now available. Please contact the

    author directly at nader.mir@sjsu.edu for copy.

    0.2 Errors in This Solution Manual

    If you nd any error in this solution manual, please directly inform the

    author at nader.mir@sjsu.edu .

    0.3 How to Obtain an Updated Solution Manual

    Please check time to time the web page of the text-book in the Prentice-

    Hall site and click on Instructors link to obtain the latest version of this

    solution manual.

    iii

  • iv CONTENTS

    0.4 How to Contact Author

    Please feel free to send any feedback on the text book to Department of Elec-

    trical Engineering, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192, U.S.A,

    or via email at nader.mir@sjsu.edu. The preparation of this version of the

    solution manual took years and the manual may contain some errors. Please

    also feel free to send me any feedback on this solution manual.

    I would love to hear from you especially if you have suggestions for im-

    proving this book further for its next editions. I will carefully read all review

    comments. You can nd out more about me at: http://www.engr.sjsu.edu/nmir

    I hope that you enjoy the text and that you receive a little of my liking for

    the computer communications from it.

    Nader F. Mir

    San Jose, California

  • About the Author

    Nader F. Mir received the B.Sc. degree (with honors) in electrical &

    computer engineering in 1985 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees both in

    electrical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, MO, in

    1990 and 1994 respectively.

    He is currently a professor and department associate chairman of Elec-

    trical Engineering at San Jose State University, California. He is also the

    director of MSE Program in Optical Sensors and Networks for Lockheed

    Martin Space Systems. Previously, he was an associate professor at this

    school and assistant professor at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

    From 1994 to 1996, he was a research scientist at the Advanced Telecommu-

    nications Institute, Stevens Institute of Technology, in New Jersey, working

    on the design of advanced telecommunication networks. From 1990 to 1994,

    he was with the Computer and Communications Research Center at Wash-

    ington University in St. Louis and worked as a research assistant on design

    and analysis of high-speed switching-systems projects.

    His research interests are: analysis of computer communication networks,

    design and analysis of switching systems, network design for wireless ad-

    hoc and sensor systems, and applications of digital integrated circuits in

    computer communications.

    He is a senior member of the IEEE and has served as the member of

    Technical Program Committee and Steering Committee of a number of major

    IEEE networking conferences such as WCNC, GLOBECOM, and ICC. Dr.

    v

  • vi CONTENTS

    Mir has published numerous refereed technical journal and conference papers

    all in the eld of communications and networking. He has published a

    book in video communication engineering, and another text-book published

    by Prentice Hall Publishing Co. entitled Computer & Communication

    Networks, Design and Analysis.

    Dr. Mir has received a number of prestigious national and university

    awards including the university teaching recognition award and research

    excellence award. He is also the recipient of the 2004 IASTED Outstanding

    Tutorial Presentation award.

    Currently, he has several journal editorial positions such as: the Edito-

    rial Board Member of the International Journal of Internet Technology and

    Secured Transactions, the Editor of Journal of Computing and Information

    Technology, and the Associate Editor of IEEE Communication Magazine.

  • Part I

    Fundamental Concepts

    1

  • Chapter 1

    Packet-Switched Networks

    1. Total distance = = 2(3, 0002 + 10, 0002) = 20,880.61 km.

    Speed = c = 2.3 108 m/s.

    (a) proagation delay = tp =c =

    20,880.61 km2.3108m/s = 90.8 ms

    (b) Number of bits in transit during the propagation delay

    = (90.8 ms) (100 106 b/s)= 9.08 Mb

    (c) 10 bytes = 80 bits

    2.5 bytes = 20 bits, then:

    total length = 80 + 20 = 100 bits

    T = 100 b100106 b/s = 1 s

    2. Total distance = = 2((30/1000)2 + 10, 0002) 20,000 km.

    Speed = c = 2.3 108 m/s.

    (a) tp =c =

    20,000 km2.3108 m/s = 87 ms

    (b) 100 Mb/s 0.087 s = 8.7 Mb

    3

  • 4 Chapter 1. Packet-Switched Networks

    (c) Data: (10 B)8 b100 Mb/s

    + tp = 0.79 s + 0.087 s

    Ack: (2.5 B)8 b100 Mb/s

    + tp = 0.19s + 0.087 s

    Total time 1s (transfer) + 0.173 s (prop.)

    3. Assuming the speed of transmission at 2.3 108:

    (a) Total Delay: D = [np + (nh 2)]tf + (nh 1)tp + nhtr(b) tp1 =

    50 miles1600 m/miles2.3108 m/s = 0.35 ms

    tp2 =400 miles1600 m/miles

    2.3108 m/s = 2.8 ms

    Number of packets = np =200MB10KB = 20, 000

    tf =10,040 B/pockets8 b/B

    100 Mb/s= 0.8 ms/pockets

    D = [20, 000+(52)]0.8+[(31)0.35+(31)2.8]+50.2103 16.6 s

    4. Dp = [np + (nh 2)]tf1 + nhtr1 + (nh 1)tpDc = 3 ([1 + (nh 2)]tf2 + nhtr2 + (nh 1)tp)Dt = Dp + Dc = (np + nh 2)tf1 + 3(nh 1)tf2 + nh(tr1 + 3tr2) +4(nh 1)tp

    5. Number of packets = np =200MB10KB = 20, 000

    Dt = Dp +Dc

    Dc = dconn-req + dconn-accep + dconn-release

    (a) Here, the problem askes that tr be dened as the processing time

    for each packet. Therefore, tr = 20, 000 0.2 = 4,000 s

  • 5Dc = dconn-req = dconn-accep = dconn-release

    = [np + (nh 2)]tf + nhtr + (nh 1)tp= [1 + (5 2)]500 b/packet

    100 mb/s+ 3 4, 000 s + 4.84 ms

    12, 000 s(b) Same as Part (a).

    (c) Dt = Dp +Dc = 17 + 3 12, 000 = 36, 017 s

    6. s = 109 b/s

    nh = 10 nodes

    tr1 = tr2 = 0.1 s = tr

    Data forms two packets:

    (9960 + 40) bytes for packet1

    (2040 + 40) bytes for packet2

    tf1packet1 =10,000 B8 b/B

    109 b/s= 8 105 s

    tf1packet2 =2,080 B8 b/B

    109 b/s= 16.64 106 s

    tf2 = transfer times for control packets =500 b

    109 b/s= 5 107 s

    tp =c =

    500 miles1.61103 m2.3108m/s = 3.5 10

    3 s

    (a) request + accept time:

    t1 + t2 = 2 ([np + (nh 1)]tf2 + (nh 1)tp + nhtr]) = 2.06 s(b) t3 =

    12 (t1 + t2) = 1.03 s

    (c) Dt = Dp +Dc

    Dp = Dppacket1 +Dppacket2= [np + (nh 2)]tf1packet1 + nhtr1 + (nh 1)tp + [np + (nh