go figure! figurative language presentation recognizing figurative language the opposite of literal...

Download Go Figure! Figurative Language Presentation Recognizing Figurative Language The opposite of literal language is figurative language. Figurative language

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Slide 2 Go Figure! Figurative Language Presentation Slide 3 Recognizing Figurative Language The opposite of literal language is figurative language. Figurative language is language that means more than what it says on the surface. It usually gives us a feeling about its subject. Poets use figurative language almost as frequently as literal language. When you read poetry, you must be conscious of the difference. Otherwise, a poem may make no sense at all. Slide 4 Recognizing Literal Language Ive eaten so much I feel as if I could literally burst! In this case, the person is not using the word literally in its true meaning. Literal means "exact" or "not exaggerated." By pretending that the statement is not exaggerated, the person stresses how much he has eaten. Literal language is language that means exactly what is said. Most of the time, we use literal language. Slide 5 What is figurative language? Whenever you describe something by comparing it with something else, you are using figurative language. Slide 6 Imagery Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses. Sight Hearing Touch Taste Smell Slide 7 Imagery (examples) On a starry winter night in Portugal Where the ocean kissed the southern shore There a dream I never thought would come to pass Came and went like time spent through an hourglass -Teena Marie, Did you notice how descriptive the lyrics are? Portuguese Love The sample above was taken from soul, songstress of the 1980s, Teena Maries hit love song entitled Portuguese Love. Slide 8 Simile A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as. Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are strong as iron bands. Slide 9 Metaphor A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as. Example: The road was a ribbon wrapped through the dessert. Slide 10 Alliteration Repeated consonant sounds occurring at the beginning of words or within words. Example: She was wide-eyed and wondering while she waited for Walter to waken. Slide 11 More Advanced Examples Great giants groan greatly on green grass. Pretty princesses parade proudly passing people. Huge horses have heavy hoofs. Merry Mary misses many Monday movies. Prince Peter picks pretty pansies for princesses. Mean monsters make magnificent meatloaf. Fast fat frogs franticly find flies. Eddie eagerly eats eleven Easter eggs. Cheerful Carl creatively colors calico cats. Slide 12

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