Mammals Chapter 43 Table of Contents Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Section

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Mammals Chapter 43 Table of Contents Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Section 4 Primates and Human Origins Slide 2 Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Chapter 43 Objectives Describe the major characteristics of mammals. Compare the characteristics of early synapsids, early therapsids, and modern mammals. Relate the adaptive radiation of mammals to the history of dinosaurs. Differentiate between monotremes, marsupials, and placental mammals. Slide 3 Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Chapter 43 Major Characteristics All mammals have the following six major characteristics: Endothermy Hair Completely divided heart Milk Milk is produced by mammary glands. Single jawbone Specialized teeth Slide 4 Chapter 43 Characteristics of Mammals Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Slide 5 Chapter 43 Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept Characteristics of Mammals Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Slide 6 Chapter 43 Ancestors of Mammals Around 300 million years ago, amniotes diverged into two groups. One group gave rise to dinosaurs, birds, and modern reptiles. The other group, synapsids, gave rise to mammals and their extinct relatives. The first synapsids were small and looked like modern lizards. By the Permian period, various large synapsids had appeared. Unlike most other reptiles, which have uniformly shaped teeth, these early synapsids had specialized teeth. Slide 7 Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Chapter 43 Ancestors of Mammals, continued Therapsids A subset of synapsids, called therapsids, gave rise to mammals. Therapsids appeared late in the Permian period and lived into the Jurassic period. A rich fossil record of transitional forms between therapsids and mammals exists. Several features we associate with mammals evolved first among early therapsids. Slide 8 Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Chapter 43 Ancestors of Mammals, continued Early Mammals Mammals and dinosaurs appeared during the Triassic period and coexisted for more than 150 million years. Early mammals were about the size of mice and were probably insectivores that were active at night. Milk production in mammals had probably evolved by the end of the Triassic. Slide 9 Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Chapter 43 Diversification of Mammals By the middle of the Cretaceous period, about 100 million years ago, three different kinds of mammals had appeared. Monotremes are oviparous, meaning that they lay eggs. Marsupials are viviparous, meaning that they give birth to live young. In marsupials, the young develop within a pouch on the mothers body for some time after birth. Placental mammals are also viviparous, but in this group, the fetus typically develops within the mothers reproductive system for a longer time and receives nourishment through a blood-rich structure called the placenta. After the Cretaceous period, mammals took over many of the ecological roles that dinosaurs previously had. Today, nearly all large terrestrial animals are mammals. Slide 10 Chapter 43 Phylogenetic Diagram of Vertebrates Section 1 Origin and Evolution of Mammals Slide 11 Chapter 43 Objectives Explain the advantage of endothermy in mammals. Identify features of the mammalian respiratory and circulatory systems that help sustain a rapid metabolism. Describe mammalian adaptations for obtaining food. Compare the nervous system of mammals to that of other groups of animals. Differentiate among the patterns of development in monotremes, marsupials, and placental mammals. Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Slide 12 Chapter 43 Endothermy Mammals are endotherms, meaning they conserve and regulate this body heat. Endothermy allows mammals to remain active in cold climates. Also, the metabolism needed for endothermy enables strenuous activities for extended periods. Mammalian organ systems are uniquely adapted for endothermy. Mammals have unique circulatory and digestive systems. Also, mammals have adaptations to conserve body temperature, such as body insulation. Slide 13 Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Chapter 43 Endothermy, continued Circulatory System The structure of the mammalian heart allows efficient pumping of blood throughout the body. The mammalian heart has two atria, two ventricles, and a septum completely separating the ventricles. The complete septum is an adaptation that allows mammals bodies to use oxygen more efficiently. Respiratory System A mammals respiratory system allows efficient gas exchange. Mammalian lungs have a much larger surface area available for gas exchange than reptilian lungs do. At rest, mammals breathe primarily with their diaphragm. Slide 14 Chapter 43 Mammalian Heart Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Slide 15 Chapter 43 Mammalian Lungs Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Slide 16 Chapter 43 Feeding and Digestion For most mammals, the breakdown of food begins with chewing. Variations in the size and shape of teeth among different mammalian species reflect differences in diet. Chisel-like incisors cut. Pointed canines grip, puncture, and tear. Premolars shear, shred, cut, or grind. Molars grind, crush, or cut. Mammalian carnivores are recognizable by their sharp incisors and long canines. Baleen whales have baleen instead of teeth. Slide 17 Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Chapter 43 Feeding and Digestion, continued Special Adaptations for Digesting Plants Herbivorous mammals have long digestive tracts with contain special organs that harbor symbiotic microorganisms, which can break down cellulose. Some herbivorous mammal have a rumen and are called ruminants. Other herbivorous mammals have a cecum. Slide 18 Chapter 43 Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept Adaptations for Plant Eating Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Slide 19 Chapter 43 Nervous System Mammals generally have higher ratios of brain size to body size than other vertebrates. Humans, other primates, and whales have the highest ratios, due mostly to the size of the cerebrum. The cerebrum evaluates input from the sense organs, controls movement, initiates and regulates behavior, and functions in memory and learning. As with other terrestrial vertebrates, a mammals survival depends on five major senses. Most bats, which are active at night, use echolocation to locate prey and other objects. Slide 20 Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Chapter 43 All mammal groups feed milk to their young. Monotremes Monotremes lay large eggs and then incubate them. The mother protects and feeds newborns until they can survive on their own. Marsupials In marsupials, an embryo develops within the mothers uterus, but soon emerges and crawls into the mothers pouch. There, the newborn attaches to a nipple to feed; development and growth continue inside the pouch for several months. Placental Mammals Placental mammals give birth to well-developed young after a long period of development inside the uterus. During this period, the placenta provides nourishment and oxygen to developing offspring. Development Slide 21 Chapter 43 Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept Parts of a Placenta Section 2 Characteristics of Mammals Slide 22 Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Chapter 43 Objectives Identify an example from each of the 12 major orders of mammals. Distinguish between monotremes, marsupials, and placental mammals. Compare the characteristics of artiodactyls and perissodactyls. Compare the adaptations for aquatic life in cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Slide 23 Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Chapter 43 Mammalian Orders Mammals are commonly classified into: a single order of monotremes seven orders of marsupials about 18 orders of placental mammals Slide 24 Chapter 43 Phylogenetic Diagram of Mammals Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Slide 25 Chapter 43 Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept Types of Mammals Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Slide 26 Chapter 43 Monotremes The order Monotremata the monotremes, is the only order in the subclass Prototheria. Monotremes probably evolved before other kinds of mammals. Just three species exist today: The duckbill platypus is adapted to life around rivers or streams in Australia. Two echidna species live in dry woodlands or deserts in Australia and New Guinea. Slide 27 Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Chapter 43 Marsupials The marsupials had previously been classified in one order, Marsupialia, but are now divided into at least seven orders within the super order Marsupialia. The majority of about 280 species of marsupials live in Australia, but some live in New Guinea and the Americas. The Virginia opossum is the only marsupial native to the United States. Scientists think that marsupials began to evolve in isolation when Australia and New Guinea drifted away from the other continents more than 40 million years ago. Slide 28 Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Chapter 43 Placental Mammals Nearly 95 percent of all mammalian species are placental mammals, making up the infraclass Eutheria of the subclass Theria. They are classified into 18 orders: XenarthraLagomorphaRodentiaPrimatesChiropteraInsectivora CarnivoraArtiodactylaPerissodactylaCetaceaSireniaProbscidea MacroscelideaPholidotaTubulidentataScandentiaDermopteraHyracoidea Slide 29 Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Chapter 43 Placental Mammals, continued Order Xenarthra The order Xenarthra includes about 30 living species of anteaters, armadillos, and sloths living in the Americas. Order Lagomorpha The order Lagomorpha, the lagomorphs, includes about 70 species of rabbits, hares, and pikas. Slide 30 Section 3 Diversity of Mammals Chapter 43 Placental Mammals, continued Order Rodentia The order Rodentia, the rodents, is the largest mammalian order, which includes more than 1,800 species. Rodents are adapted to a wide range of habitats worldwide. Squirrels, mar