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  • Fall 2012 Vol. 39 | No. 10

    WHERE ENGINEERING MEETS ART

  • Fall 2012

    Contents

    L AUNCHPAD

    President's Letter ...............................................................4Letter from Distinguished Alum .............................................5

    ON THE C OVER

    The fields of art and engineering have long intersected in innovative and exciting ways. Our fall issue, themed Where Engineering Meets Art, explores those unique, creative endeavors in the digital age.

    10|LUKE DUBOISLuke DuBois discusses vertical music and the intersection of digital media and the arts, from music to the use of language and the diversity of human thought.

    06| THE ENABLED PUBLICAnyone can find great works of art online and print it out, but does that make for enlightened discourse? Chistopher Leslie looks at social media and its affect on the arts.

    2 CABLE | Fall 2012

    FEATURES

    TABLE OF C ONTENT S

  • Contents

    DEPARTMENT S

    Faculty News and Research .......................................... 28Faculty Notes ............................................................ 31Poly Buzz .................................................................. 32Alumni News ............................................................ 37Events ...................................................................... 44In Memoriam, Obituary ............................................... 44Class Notes ............................................................... 45

    14|MARC GALLOUsing digital signal processing, Marc Gallo creates the sound of electric guitar amplifiers, like Marshall or Fender, without spending thousands of dollars on hardware.

    18| WHEN LEFT MEETS RIGHTNYU-Poly students like Daphany Sanchez (shown) find the balance and rewards of pursuing twin passions in both engineering and the arts, be it dancing or painting.

    24| KAHO ABEGame Lab artist-in-residence has come up with new ways of thinking outside the vid-eo-game box. First step: Elimi-nate a handheld controller and replace with the human body.

    | ON THEWEBAccess the fall 2012 digital edition of Cable at cable.poly.edu/fall2012!

    CABLE | Fall 2012 3cable.poly.edu

  • PRESIDENT'S LET TERMASTHEAD

    4 CABLE | Fall 2012

    Jerry MacArthur HultinPRESIDENT

    Erica MarksVICE PRESIDENT DEVELOPMENT AND

    ALUMNI RELATIONS, INTERIM

    Valerie CabralDIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS

    Melynda FullerDIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

    EDITOR, CABLE

    Alexander GelfandKarl Greenberg

    Harvest HendersonHallie KapnerPatrick KeeffeCielo Lutino Liza Monroy Elinor Nauen

    CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

    Accelerant Studios PUBLICATION DESIGN

    Marian GoldmanElena Olivo

    PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    Address Correspondence to:Melynda Fuller, Cable Editor

    Office of Marketing and CommunicationsPolytechnic Institute of NYU

    15 Metrotech CenterBrooklyn, NY 11201

    Email: mfuller@poly.eduOr call (718) 260-3971

    Change of address:Office of Development and Alumni Relations

    Polytechnic Institute of NYU15 MetroTech CenterBrooklyn, NY 11201

    Email alumni@poly.eduor call (718) 260-3885

    Polytechnic website: www.poly.edu

    Produced by Polytechnic Offices of Development and Alumni Relations and Marketing and Communications.

    Polytechnic Institute of NYU is an Equal Opportunity Employer.The Institute is committed to provide equal employment

    opportunity to all employees and to all applicants foremployment regardless of race, color, sex, religion, national

    origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, marital status,genetic predisposition or carrier status, military status orany other status protected by federal, state or local law.

    Polytechnic Institute of New York University is a 501(c) (3)

    Printed on partially recycled paper.Certified processed chlorine free.

    Earlier this fall, we celebrated a first at NYU-Poly: an art opening on our Brooklyn campus. Two of our alumni, Kent and Marguerite Charugundla, 12MOT and 10MOT, respectively, shared their collectiona wonderful mix of paintings and Bollywood posters which now lines the hallways of our administrative offices and Rogers Hallwith us. Students are already catching me and saying, Wow, that is cool! and corporate people walk onto campus and say, This place has an edge.

    The intersection of design and engineering is game-changing. Steve Jobs showed the world that. The exhibit creates an environment where our students interact with art, where they can learn to think in new and different ways because of it.

    In this issue of Cable, themed Where Engineering Meets Art, youll meet three NYU-Po-ly students who have already found that intersection in When Left Meets Right: Poly Students Who Do It All; find a profile of our artist-in-residence Kaho Abe in the Game Innovation Lab who is using her background as a fashion designer to take game design to a new level; and hear from Poly alum Marc Gallo, an electrical engineer revolutionizing the way music is made. All of these are great examples of the innovation that happens when engineering and art collide.

    As we become a school of NYU in the next two years, great opportunities will continue to emerge for our students. Our budding engineers will have access to all of the wonder-ful creative collaborations happening across NYU, including film studies, the liberal arts, policy, law and business. Most of all, Polys i2e spirit has helped our alumni, faculty, staff and current students find new ways to create a better world.

    With Warmest Regards,

    Jerry M. Hultin

  • LET TER FROM DISTINGUISHED ALUM: JOHN SCHAEFER

    Ive been fascinated with photography as an art form and a form of commu-nication my entire life. When I was a young child, the son of immigrants, I came to know my relatives through photo-graphsthe only way I could know those who were out of reach; as I grew older, I realized that photographs are incredibly important documents, more powerful than written documents in many cases.

    Photographs taken in the 1860s during the Civil War and in the 1850s during the Crimean War allowed people to see the impact of battle for the first time. This was only possible because of the invention of the camera, and marks a revolutionary occasion when art and technology inter-sected to permanently change the publics access to a form of creative expression, by effect opening up the world. The Vietnam War came to an end because of photog-raphy, when the public couldnt stand to see another horrific image from abroad, and, before that, photographers like Lewis Hine and Jacob Riis raised social aware-ness about issues like child labor and immigrants rights. Portraits, formerly

    the domain of painters and the wealthy, became accessible to the common man through photography.

    For me, the intersection between science and art begins at a molecular level. Early on, I began to print my own photographs in a dark room I built for myself. Being a chemist, I used my knowledge to explore exotic processes during the developing and printing process. Artists often ignore the expected rules of their medium and create works of art in the process, while scientists are committed to bringing order to things. I try to make nature as neatly defined a process as possible in my imag-esthe scientist in me, while manipulat-ing the medium after in the darkroomthe artist.

    Past history has shown that technology also allows the creation of art to become a more democratic process, giving indi-viduals the ability to share thoughts and ideas more easily. Ultimately, technology gives artists the enhanced ability to com-municate about the subjects that moved them to create in the first place.

    A Scientist's Touch, an Artist's EyeJohn Schaefer, NYU-Poly alum and board member and President Emeritus of the University of Arizona, has had a lifelong passion for photography. In addition to producing his own body of nature photography, he co-founded the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona in 1975 with Ansel Adams and has published three best selling books on photographic technics. To open our Fall 2012 issue of Cable focusing on the intersection of engineering and the arts, Schaefer shared his thoughts on the blending of science and creativity.

    CABLE | Fall 2012 5cable.poly.edu

    Mission San Xavier del Bac, located in Tucson and built in the 1700s by Father Kino, a Spanish missionary

    A still of the cactus flower Peniocereus greggii

  • In 1900, Nicolai Tesla had a vision of a service that would beam information to the public, showering them with words as well as free electric power. In his autobiography, Tesla describes the world system whereby watch-sized receivers would allow users to listen to music and hear lectures. Tesla was not the only one with such a dream: Jules Verne described a similar (but wired) system in his novel Paris in the Twentieth Century, and Paul Valry in 1928 wrote Le conquete de lubiquite, where he described a service that would bring music into the home like water, electricity, and gas.

    A century later, we seem to be about to realize this vision; although information services are not free, they are approaching the ubiquity of public utilities bringing the arts into the home as reliably as natural

    THE ENABLED PUBLIC:SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ARTS

    gas. It is important to remember, though, that even in Teslas time there were individuals who worried about turning the arts into a utility. In a1909 short story The Machine Stops, E. M. Forester imagines an atomized world in which people have access to artistic productions in their underground homes. The story opens, in fact, with one of the characters preparing to give a lecture on music. The end of the story demonstrat