portfolio | spring 2009 - spring 2013

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Academic and professional architectural, landscape, urban design, and graphic design work.

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  • SHERI ZONPORTFOLIO | 2009 - 2013

  • Cover Photo Credit: Gawker.com

  • CONTENTS

    T R A N S - A L A S K A N P I P E L I N E

    OUT OF SITE : OUT OF MIND

    CRUDE RISK

    BRACKETING THE FECUND

    B I O F U E L R E S E A R C H

    PRODUCTIVE S U R F A C E S

    D E T R O I T FUTURE CITY RogueHAA

    NEW YORK IS NOT A PLACE

    OAK STREET BEACH + F A C I L I T I E S

    G L O R I E S MASTER PLAN + D E S I G N C E N T E R

    D R A P I N G D E N S I T Y

    Bachelor of Science in Architecture - University of Illinois in Chicago

    Master of Architecture - University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

    2012

    2009 2009 2008 2007

    2010 2011

    20122012

    2013 2012

    2011

    Research - University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

    Professional Work - Hamilton Anderson Associates, Detroit

  • OUT OF SITE : OUT OF MIND

    THESIS: Oil Sands Landscape of Alberta Canada

    Advisor: Kathy VelikovSpring 2012

  • above: notation of mining movement on the transitioning oil sands landscape.

  • The oil sands reserve north of Fort McMurray, Canada occupy 54,000 square miles; larger than the entire country of England. Extraction of oil from the sands is done through both mining and in-situ techniques. The system is reliant on a network of infrastructures continuously be constructed for its increasing capacity. Byproducts of production, such as sulfur, coke and mature fine tailings, are stored on site in huge volumes because of their overabundance and inability to sell in the global market. The production created a vast landscape of open-air storage, pipelines, and roads. It also spurred the development of other related industries in the areas such as tree harvesting and lumber yards, pipeline development, and technological exploration both on site and at academic institutions.

    The Alberta landscape, once a vast wilderness, was scraped away for a resource fused within its soils. When the oil has been emptied from an area, the land is reclaimed in an attempt to renovate it into its original ecological condition. The ecological landscape is an artificial one; external to ones untouched adjacent to it and functioning on the dependence of human implementations.

    The oil sands reserve in Northern Alberta operates using intense landscape transformations within a subarctic climate. The industry generates a series of surreal landscapes and atmospheric conditions as a byproduct of extraction processes. An opportunity for design lies within the transforming landscape and its infrastructural networks to create another externality of production. Oil sands extraction gives leverage to capitalize on the industrial and post-industrial landscape through enhancing atmospheres and events. An afterlife is generated for the processed landscape in which preservation of the man-made landscape creates curiosity and wonderment.

    MACHINES:BUCKET WHEEL EXCAVATORAble to excavate 240 000 cubic

    meters of overburden per day.

    BUCKET EXCAVATOR

    EXCAVATOR

    DUMP TRUCK400 ton payload.

    HUMAN

    1 2 3

  • 12

    3

  • top: site plan middle: materials made with out of oil

    bottom: section of Phase 1 development of Oil Sands Na-tional Preserve

    An opportunity for design lies within the transforming landscape and its infrastructural networks to generate another externality of production tourism within the borders of operations. Oil sands extraction gives leverage to expose the industrial and post-industrial landscape through enhancing atmospheres and revealing events. It also generates use of the landscape during operations to develop continued use when all the oil is extracted from the sands and corporations move to other resourceful regions.

    Tourism injects the consumer into a landscape made by consumption to allow visitors to comprehend the co-dependence of not only oil and consumption, but also oil and its extraction processes. During operations, the visitor is able to experience the processes and products made from oil and their associated inputs, outputs and byproducts. They also witness the transformations of the landscape of tree harvesting, mining, storage sites for tailings and sands, and attempted reclamation. After extraction, new uses are generated from the mechanically transformed landscapes of production one either left as cliffs

    and mounds or ones reclaimed to mimic the surrounding boreal forest. This proposal attempts to give the landscape an afterlife in instances of both post-industrial terrain and landscapes undertaken in reclamation. It allows visitors to marvel or question the technological progress of man in an age of uncontrolled consumption.

    Four architecture typologies explore ways to overcome inhuman conditions that restrict access or exploration of the site: the viewing tower, underground passage, accommodation modules, and roaming platforms.

    Architecture facilitates in the goal of engagement by becoming a lens through which to view the condition and eliminate the luxury of ignorance. The material development of the architecture embodies the dual and conflicted nature of our current relationship with oil, landscape and waste products. The architecture reflects a culture both concerned with material reuse and recycling, however at the same time unable to part with the fantastic products, materials and surfaces that oil produces.

  • top: Preserve viewing tower; each opened level focuses on the various landscapes and atmospheres created by production.

    VIEWING TOWER The viewing tower is made of recycled machine metals and concrete. Viewport platforms expand to the horizon or the various landscape created by extraction. The top of the tower extents above the emissions and clouds for a view of the norther lights.

  • 2012

    2013

    2015

  • 2018

    2025

    DRILL-HOLE TOWER Dug from an oil drill hole, the tower is slowly excavated as the oils sands landscape is mined. The structure begins as a deep elevator and tunnel that moves you though the sands. As the ground is excavated, new views and activities of the mined landscape emerge.

  • A MATERIAL PALETTEThe architecture is made only from oil-based materials and by-products

    of extraction.

    B TAILINGS PODFloating on the surface of the acres of toxic tailings ponds, these livable pods soaks in oil residue with its hair-like bands for sustained energy generation.

    C MOBILE PODWith the help of a recycled wheel of an bucket excavator, this pod allows tourists to safely and comfotably maneuver than landscape.

    D EXCAVATOR PODAfter hanging from the claws of the excavator, this pod penetrates the leftover sands to use suck the last of their oil for heat and electricity.

    B

    A

    C

    fibrous oil collectorpre-formed, plastic shellair filterrecycled tireplexi-glass movement guide

  • Dholding clawoil suctioncombustionpre-formed shellinsulationclean water storage

    access platformair filtrationradiant heater

  • Productive Surfaces focuses on hijacking fossil powered industrial zones for the production of renewable energy and public programming. On the highly industrialized and contaminated sites along the Rouge River in Detroit, vacant lots are used to cultivate switchgrass that is then transported via industrial rail to the power plant. The switchgrass acts to both remediate contaminated soil too toxic for human use and transform the vacant lots for productive use. Once at the power plant, the switchgrass

    replaces coal to generate electricity - reducing emissions commonly produced by fossil powered generation. Also, the nearby wastewater treatment plant is capped to capture sludge gases for transfer and consumption at the local natural gas plant. The final phase of the project focuses specifically on the transformed power plant, which is turned into a public site of education and entertainment. Its wind-capturing faade transforms and responds to energy production and wind conditions.

    PRODUCTIVE SURFACESRe-Thinking Power Generation

    Instructor: Kathy VelikovFall 2010Nominated by instructor for Annual Student Show

  • above: changes for conversion of coal power plant to switchgrass power plant

    top: plan of Detroit generation plants and infrastructure for electric transmission.

    DETROIT

    MONROE

    ANN ARBOR

  • The industrial site next to the River Rouge in Detroit has overlapping conditions of existing and potential energy production. Within site boundaries, there are a coal-fired power plant, natural gas power plant, waste water treatment plant, and a variety of heavy industry. The end goal for the project is the reduction of air and soil pollutants in the area by overriding the existing system with local, alternate energy sources. Vacant lots allow for the growth and harvest of switchgrass plants. These plants not only supply fuel for power plant, but also remove toxins from the soil for future planting. The seeding of the switchgrass alternates locations to allow for recreational neighborhood use. These plants are transported using the existing rail to the power plant for both direct combustion and gasification for electric generation. The gas is transferred via pipeline to the natural gas power plant followed above by a recreation pedestrian pathway. Harnessing the strongest winds in Detroit, wind turbines are placed in locations that do not interfere with industrial activities both on land and in the water. Lastly, the foul methane odors from the wastewater treatments plant are capped and captured to be used as a gaseous fuel at the gas-powered electric plant.

    An emphasis was put on the social aspects of hijacking t