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Naked Blood Zine

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  • NAKED BLOOD

  • Print is not dead. Even so, as we sit in this 21st century (and as I type this on the internet) digital media has become the way of the day. Now I can give my thoughts to as many people as can right click. Why would anyone go to the pain and trouble that it takes to put together a zine? Why suffer needlessly when blogs are by and large free and easy? Because there is a difference. Always was, and always will be. Looking at the pages of skate mags back in the day was an experience like no other. Flipping through the pages, explor-ing skateboarding moment by moment, discover-ing art, music, and the alluring underbelly of the scene was a journey of constant discoveryand this was hands on discovery. How many times did someone tag a ledge in the pages of one of my Thrashers? Or pulled out a whole page to put up on the wall for motivation? We all placed our-selves in the magazine, whether by tagging the blank spaces in the pictures, fantasizing about getting our own pictures in the magazines, peep-

    ing Slap for the word on smoothness, or planning the next night of city-wide destruction (on walls or ledges; with cans or trucks). There is really no comparing the two experiences. Right click all you want, itll never feel the same. With this in mind, and with the example of other DIY mastersin both the graff and skate sceneas a source of inspiration, I have attempted to continue the two-way dialogue between reader and creator that was so prevalent in my connection to the PDJVEDFNZKHQ,KRSH\RXHQMR\WKLVUVWLVVXHDVmuch as I enjoyed making it. Many thanks to all the homies, and especially Aiden Duffy, Jesse Brown, Matthew Ziegler, Brendan Drummey, and Ezekiel Fry, it couldnt have happened without you guys.

    -Naked Blood.

    nakedblood.tumblr.comcrewslouis@yahoo.com

  • PETER PAN POSSE

  • THE CITY NEVER SLEEPS, FULL OF VILLIANS AND CREEPSTHAT'S WHERE I LEARNED TO DO MY HUSTLE HAD TO SCUFFLE WITH FREAKS

  • WHERE MY HEART RESIDES, UNTIL THE DAY I DIE. THEN SCATTER MY ASHES THROUGHOUT THE LOWER EAST SIDE.

  • CHARLIE HUSTLE tees

  • CHARLIE HUSTLE tees

    FIND AND BUY TEES @ URBANSTREETWEARNYC.COM

  • JESSE BROWN

    PHOTO BY MARSHALL STACK REID

  • Naked Blood / Jesse brown

    Jesse Brown is a multidisciplinary visual artist, designer and co-creative director of Sausage Skateboards based in Seattle, Wa.His work has been exhibited with galleries in Seattle, Los Angeles, Portland, Chicago, New York, Tokyo, Berlin, London and Paris.

    Jesses work is often an exploration in geo-metric forms, pattern, typography, shape and repetition which display a very clean, graphic quality. He is known for working in a variety of mediums including drawing, painting, design, typography, sculpture, murals, artist books, installation, video and textile works.

    www.papervspencil.comwww.sausageskateboards.com

    NB: Can you just talk a little about your art and different mediums that you work with?

    JB: Yeah I do a lot of stuff with paper, paper has been the big thing from me the last few years. Lots of drawings but besides that lots of paper sculptures kinda building these little structures , these weird village things that are in some ways about architecture and some ways about shape and all that. I also make paintings and some installation stuff. But mostly drawing and sculpture have been the things that I have been doing most.

    1%5DGDVIDUDVLQXHQFHVJRGR\RXhave people that you look up too?

    JB: I guess so yah. There are a ton of artists that I like. There is a guy named Lawrence Weiner that does mostly type-based work. His work is cool but he has done a lot of writing on his approch and his ideas of what he does, and that stuff is super interesting to me. Im drawn to people whos work I like visually but I also like being able to hear what they have to say about their ideas and process.1%,NQRZWKDW\RXMXWKDGDFRXSOHVKRZVLQ6HDWWOHFDQ\RXWHOOPHDOLWWOHDERXWthem?

    -%

  • They are all old friends of mine and also sign painters. So yah we got the opportunity to do that show and its kinda like the dream show for all of us. We have all wanted to do something like that forever, so we did that and that was super fun. And then yeah I did a show with Kristen Ramir-ez in pioneer square at the ok hotel. That was more type based sign stuff. She and I were just NLQGDOLNHIDQVRIHDFKRWKHUDWUVW$QGWKHQwe did some trades together. She had that show and teaches at conish and has a kid, and ZDVOLNH,GRQWWKLQN,FDQOOWKHZKROHWKLQJand asked me to split the gallery with her. So

    that as cool and it worked out really well.

    1%6DXVDJH6NDWHERDUGV&DQ\RXMXVWWHOOPHDOLWWOHDERXWZKDWVDXVDJHVNDWHERDUGVLVand about.

    JB: We have been talking about and planning Sausage for a couple years now it moved pretty VORZDWUVW%XWLWVP\VHOIDQG7RGG/RZQZKRdo all the creative direction and art work. And Steve Gonzales is the other partner in it. Who is also a partner at Goods and has now opened up DQHZVKRS$OLYH:HOO6WHYHKDVEHHQD[WXUHin the Seattle skate scene for as long as I can remember. So it was more Todd and Steves idea

  • JESSE BROWN, BACK TAIL.

    and then they kinda brought me in a little bit later. And then there of course is some other people that do different stuff with us. But yah our timing kinda worked out well when, unfortunately, Manik skate-boards went under around the same time that we were plan-ning to do Sausage. Basically, it came out of us wanting to do something that was are own, that was a Seattle thing. And at the time there was no local board companies. Of course all the shops have decks and clothing companies and there is dirty bearings but yah we wanted something of our own. I guess Todd and I felt that there werent any boards that we were really pumped on as

    far as graphics go. So we are doing are own thing and yah we are doing clothing as well. Thats been all super fun. We will prob-ably do some guest artist in the future. But as of now its just him and I doing that. We just received our biggest shipment of Sausage stuff in and the website should be up in a week or so. We are working on getting some ac-counts with shops around the city as well as shops around the country too.

    1%,VVHHPVNLQGDOLNHDFRP-pany built for skater by skater?

    JB: Yes, totally. We have some people that ride for us. But we also have a larger crew. I dont

    DIRTY DAN, BACKLIP

  • know. We just do it the way we want to do it and not necessarily just follow any existing companies. I mean we are not going to com-pete with something like Real skateboards or anything. Its mostly about in way pulling everyone together and representing our skate scene here. That is super rich and has been around forever. We have had a bunch of crazy people come out of here. I feel like a brand like HUF or DQM, which are very based in the city that they are from. Or FTC or something. There wasnt anything really repping Seattle. So we want to rep Seattle but not in a over the top way where all we do is space needle t shirts. We want to be more then just a Seattle thing but we want to rep what we have out here.

    1%$VIDUDVVNDWHERDUGLQJLQXHQFHVJRIRU\RXVHOI":KRKDYHEHHQELJLQXHQFHVfor you? I know you have been skate-ERDUGLQJVLQFH\RXZHUHDZHHODG

    JB: Yeah I have skated in Seattle since I was like nine, so I am at like 20 years now. I guess I dont really pay attention to the magazines

    nowadays, and the big industry of skateboard-ing. I mean I respect it and all. But I am way more pumped on people in the town and peo-ple that I grew up skating with. The old days of Red Square, old Westlake stuff and old Sea-skate.Mostly people that are down with Sau-sage...Dirty Dan, Todd Lown, Scott Sorensen, Ryan Gomez, Joey Johnson, Zack Rockstad, Alex Johnson, Bobby Dodd, Andy Kelly, people like that That have been around forever. And Steve Gonzales for sure has been around and is still so pumped on skating in Seattle. Mike Childress is another dude, Yoshi of course, and Reggie still has the best style.

    NB: Rad, you mentioned Red Square and Westlake, do you have a favorite spot in Seattle to skate?

    JB: Yeah, I have weird little crusty spots in Bal-lard, cause thats where I grew up. But really if I took anyone there they wouldnt be into it. But there is stuff there that I will still go skate. West-lake and Red Square kinda go up and down, throughout the years. But they are both still totally doable and I feel like they always will be in some ways. As you know, the Cal Anderson

  • tennis courts are kinda like my spot. And that came from doing the Sausage Friday nights at the courts. Which we will do will do again when it get nicer out. %XW,DPUHDOO\LQWRVNDWLQJDWJURXQG6RWKH&DO$QGHUVRQFRXUWVRU770LQRU,MXVWOPHGDOLQHWKHUHyesterday!

    1%*URZLQJXSGLG\RXKDYHDIDYRULWHYLGHRSDUWWKDW\RXZHUHVXSHUK\SHGRQ"6RPHWKLQJWKDWUHDOO\UDQJWUXHIRU\RX"

    JB: Yeah, well I guess there is a bunch. Thats the time that I was really paying attention to that stuff. I always like the mid 90s East Coast stuff. My friends and I all paid attention to that stuff. There was all the California stuff and then there was that. Which I think we paid attention to more cause it was like skating in the city and skating big plazas. Which seemed more similar to what we were skating. So yeah, Eastern Exposure 3 was great. Any of the 411 VMs 8-11 had a lot of east coast coverage with Matt Reason and Fred Gal, dudes like that. Just that really raw, fast skating. I feel like if you were around Seattle in the 90s downtown, thats kinda how skating here was. We had Westlake like how Philly had Love Park or how DC had Pulaski. Westlake was our downtown plaza, and it was pretty crazy down there. Stereo videos, I really liked a lot. Tin Can Folklore was rad, and was different video at the time. They