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Midlands Astronomy Club's April issue of the REALTA magazine

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  • www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 12

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Above: Cancer is one of the twelve constellations of the zodiac. Its name is Latin for crab and it is commonly represented as such. Cancer is small and its stars are faint. It lies between Gemini to the west and Leo to the east, Lynx to the north and Canis Minor and Hydra to the south.

    Above: A sky chart showing the centre of the Lyrid meteor shower. Look for the star Vega as a guide.

    Above: The M51 galaxy and its companion (NGC 5195) are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars.

    Above: The Beehive Cluster is an open cluster in the constellation Cancer and is one of the nearest open clusters to the Solar System.

  • www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 11

    www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 2

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

  • Page - 10

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Above: This set of images compares rocks seen by NASA's Opportunity rover and Curiosity rover at two different parts of Mars. On the left is " Wopmay" rock in Endurance Crater, Meridiani Planum, as studied by the Opportunity rover. On the right are the rocks of the "Sheepbed" unit in Yellowknife Bay in Gale Crater, as seen by Curiosity.

    www.midlandsastronomy.com www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 3

    Above: Curiosity's drill in action at Yellowknife Bay on the red planet.

  • Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 9 Page - 4

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Rare triple quasar found

    Below: Overlay of the new GRG (blue

    -white colours) on an optical image from the Digitized Sky survey. The inset shows the central galaxy triplet. The image is about 2 Mpc across.

    One thing that is seen every year, in case you miss it, is the Sun, seen here by many properly-equipped telescopes.

  • Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Page - 5 Page - 8 www.midlandsastronomy.com

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Above: Astronomical artist David Hardy's phenomenal drawing of a star orbiting a collapsed companion. Not originally meant to represent the system described here, it nonetheless paints a good picture of it.

    Above: A computer simulation, based on real physics, of a black hole tearing apart a star.

  • Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Page - 7 Page - 6 www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Astronomers discover a new kind of supernova Asteroid 2012-DA14 will pass E

    arth closely on Feb. 15, 2013 (NASA)

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Above: Scientists have now discovered that studying meteorites from the giant asteroid Vesta helps them understand the event known as the "lunar cataclysm," when a repositioning of the gas giant planets destabilized a portion of the asteroid belt and triggered a solar-system-wide bombardment.

    Above: This artist's conception shows the suspected progenitor of a new kind of supernova called type Iax. Material from a hot, blue helium star at right is funnelling toward a carbonoxygen white dwarf star at left, which is embedded in an accretion disk. In many cases the white dwarf survives the subsequent explosion.

    Hubble observes the hidden depths of M77

  • Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Page - 7 Page - 6 www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Astronomers discover a new kind of supernova Asteroid 2012-DA14 will pass E

    arth closely on Feb. 15, 2013 (NASA)

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Above: Scientists have now discovered that studying meteorites from the giant asteroid Vesta helps them understand the event known as the "lunar cataclysm," when a repositioning of the gas giant planets destabilized a portion of the asteroid belt and triggered a solar-system-wide bombardment.

    Above: This artist's conception shows the suspected progenitor of a new kind of supernova called type Iax. Material from a hot, blue helium star at right is funnelling toward a carbonoxygen white dwarf star at left, which is embedded in an accretion disk. In many cases the white dwarf survives the subsequent explosion.

    Hubble observes the hidden depths of M77

  • Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Page - 5 Page - 8 www.midlandsastronomy.com

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Above: Astronomical artist David Hardy's phenomenal drawing of a star orbiting a collapsed companion. Not originally meant to represent the system described here, it nonetheless paints a good picture of it.

    Above: A computer simulation, based on real physics, of a black hole tearing apart a star.

  • Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 9 Page - 4

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Rare triple quasar found

    Below: Overlay of the new GRG (blue

    -white colours) on an optical image from the Digitized Sky survey. The inset shows the central galaxy triplet. The image is about 2 Mpc across.

    One thing that is seen every year, in case you miss it, is the Sun, seen here by many properly-equipped telescopes.

  • Page - 10

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Above: This set of images compares rocks seen by NASA's Opportunity rover and Curiosity rover at two different parts of Mars. On the left is " Wopmay" rock in Endurance Crater, Meridiani Planum, as studied by the Opportunity rover. On the right are the rocks of the "Sheepbed" unit in Yellowknife Bay in Gale Crater, as seen by Curiosity.

    www.midlandsastronomy.com www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 3

    Above: Curiosity's drill in action at Yellowknife Bay on the red planet.

  • www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 11

    www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 2

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

  • www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 12

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Above: Cancer is one of the twelve constellations of the zodiac. Its name is Latin for crab and it is commonly represented as such. Cancer is small and its stars are faint. It lies between Gemini to the west and Leo to the east, Lynx to the north and Canis Minor and Hydra to the south.

    Above: A sky chart showing the centre of the Lyrid meteor shower. Look for the star Vega as a guide.

    Above: The M51 galaxy and its companion (NGC 5195) are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars.

    Above: The Beehive Cluster is an open cluster in the constellation Cancer and is one of the nearest open clusters to the Solar System.

  • www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 14 Page - 13

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Internet Highlights

  • www.midlandsastronomy.com Page - 14 Page - 13

    www.midlandsastronomy.com

    Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine Midlands Astronomy Club Magazine

    Internet Highlights