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  • Beyond Inclusion: A Mindset, An Attitude, A Repertoire of Strategies

    Randy Cranston, Feb. 26 Faye Brownlie, Apr. 25

    Collaboration and Co-Teaching Inclusion: Possibili-es and Prac-ces

    Inclusive classrooms are communi-es where all students belong, feel safe, and have ongoing opportuni-es to learn. How do we build strengths-based classes? What teaching strategies and structures best support student diversity? How can we create and maintain safe and engaging learning environments for all

    students? What does this look like in a lesson sequence? In response to these ques-ons, we will consider the roles of in-class support, class reviews,

    performance-based reading assessments, Universal Design for Learning and Backwards Design, and strategic sequences.

  • I have a beGer understanding of my beliefs, aHtudes and values about teaching and learning and inclusion.

    I have a clearer understanding of co-teaching and different roles co-teachers play.

    I have a classroom-based plan to try.

    Learning Intentions

  • Jot down 3 beliefs you have about inclusion and co-teaching

    Share with a partner Choose 1 powerful belief you have to share with the group

    Consider what these beliefs look like and sound like in prac-ce

  • Big Ideas As a school community we want to work together to meet the needs of all students.

    Inclusion is not a special educa-on model; it is a school model.

    As professionals we want to constantly examine and refine our prac-ce.

    Collabora-ve problem-solving and teaching results in new ideas, new products and a feeling of connec-on.

    Our students con-nue to change and learn and their needs, just like the schools, will change over the course of the year.

    Brownlie & Schnellert Its All About Thinking

  • Big Ideas

    Teaching counts! Our instruc-onal choices impact significantly on student learning

    We teach responsively All kids can learn and we know enough collec-vely to teach all kids! An unwavering belief that everyone has the right to be included socially, emo-onally, and intellectually

  • Improving Learningfor All

    -

    Philosophy of

    Inclusion

    Culture of Collective

    ResponsibilityFrameworkof Quality Teaching

    Process of

    Collaboration

    Growing & Circulating Professional

    Capital

    Jill Reid & Don Gordon

  • The teeter totter

    kids

    kids curriculum

  • Gathering Information about Your Students

  • The Class Review

    What are the strengths of the class?

    What are your concerns about the class as a whole?

    What are your main goals for the class this year?

    What are the individual needs in your class?

  • Class Review Learning in Safe Schools

    (Brownlie & King, 2011)

    Interests:

    Classroom Strengths Classroom Stretches

    Other Socio-Emotional Learning Language Medical

    Goals Decisions

    Individual Concerns

    Class Review Recording Form

  • Performance-Based Reading Assessment Summarizing

    Using a web, words, diagrams, and/or drawings, show that you can identify the key ideas and details from this passage (use the other side of this page).

    Connections

    How does what you just read connect with what you already know?

    Vocabulary

    Define each of the following words. Explain how you figured out what they meant.

    Inferring

    Read between the lines to find something that you believe to be true, but that isnt actually said. Explain your reasoning.

    Reflecting

    Was this reading easy or hard to understand? How did you help yourself understand? (If this was easy, what do you do to help yourself understand something more difficult?)

    Brownlie, Feniak & Schnellert, Student Diversity, 2006

  • C

    Class Review -gathering

    informa-on

    -strengths-based

    -ac-on oriented

  • Building a Mental Model for Teaching and Learning

  • You can see what the teachers, teams, and schools value by what actually goes on in the classrooms. (Brownlie, Fullerton, Schnellert, 2011, p25)

    Pedagogy trumps curriculum. (Dylan Wiliam)

  • Frameworks

    Its All about Thinking (English, Humanities, Social Studies) Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009

    Its All about Thinking (Math, Science) Brownlie, Fullerton, Schnellert, 2011

  • Universal Design for Learning Mul-ple means: -to tap into background knowledge, to ac-vate prior knowledge, to increase engagement and mo-va-on

    -to acquire the informa-on and knowledge to process new ideas and informa-on

    -to express what they know.

    Rose & Meyer, 2002

  • Access

    not accommodate or adapt

  • Backwards Design What important ideas and enduring understandings do you want the students to know?

    What thinking strategies will students need to demonstrate these understandings?

    McTighe & Wiggins, 2001

  • Approaches Assessment for learning Open-ended strategies Gradual release of responsibility Coopera-ve learning Literature circles and informa-on circles Inquiry

    Its All about Thinking Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009; Brownlie, Fullerton, & Schnellert, 2011

  • Every Child, Every Day Richard Allington and Rachael Gabriel

    In Educa-onal Leadership, March 2012

    6 elements of instruc-on for ALL students!

    View more at hGp://youngreaders.ca

  • 1. Every child reads something he or she chooses. 2. Every child reads accurately. 3. Every child reads something he or she

    understands. 4. Every child writes about something personally

    meaningful. 5. Every child talks with peers about reading and

    wri-ng. 6. Every child listens to a fluent adult read aloud.

  • Based on the belief that collabora1ve planning, teaching and assessing be6er addresses the diverse needs of students by crea1ng ongoing effec1ve programming in the classroom

    It allows more students to be reached

    Learning in Safe Schools, page 102 Chapter 9

    Collaboration and Co-Teaching: A Model of Providing Support

  • Based on the belief that collabora-ve planning, teaching and assessing beGer addresses the diverse needs of students by crea-ng ongoing effec-ve programming in the classroom

    It allows more students to be reached It focuses on the ongoing context for learning for the

    students, not just the specific remedia-on of skills removed from the learning context of the classroom

    It builds a repertoire of strategies for teachers to support the range of students in classes

    Learning in Safe Schools, page 102 Chapter 9

    Collaboration and Co-Teaching: A Model of Providing Support

  • Based on the belief that collabora-ve planning, teaching and assessing beGer addresses the diverse needs of students by crea-ng ongoing effec-ve programming in the classroom

    It allows more students to be reached It focuses on the ongoing context for learning for the

    students, not just the specific remedia-on of skills removed from the learning context of the classroom

    It builds a repertoire of strategies for teachers to support the range of students in classes

    Impera-ve students with the highest needs have the most consistent program Learning in Safe Schools, page 102 Chapter 9

    Collaboration and Co-Teaching: A Model of Providing Support

  • When interven1on is focused on classroom support it improves each students ability and opportunity to learn effec1vely/successfully in the classroom.

    A Key Belief

  • A Remedial Model

    (Deficit Model) Fixing the student

    Outside the classroom/ curriculum

    The Vision A Shim from.. to

    An Inclusive Model (Strengths Based) Fixing the curriculum

    Outside the classroom/within curriculum

    to

  • Transforma1ons within the Inclusive Model

    Pull-out Support / Physical Inclusion s-ll a remedial model to make kids fit In the class, but omen on a different plan

    Inclusion Classroom Teacher as central support Learning Support Teacher working together in a co-teaching model

  • So, what do you believe?

  • Consulta-ve

    In class

    Instruc-on outside the class, based on IEP goals

    Models of Providing Support

  • No plan, No point

  • Consultative

    regarding specific issues that arise sugges-ons for suppor-ng ongoing progress of students in mee-ng IEP goals key aspect is co-planning program planning strategy introduc-on differen-a-on, adapta-ons, modifica-ons co-instruc-on responding to emergent issues

    Models of Providing Support

  • Instruction Outside the Classroom based on IEP goals

    pre-teaching and/or re-teaching (around classroom content) reading strategies wri-ng process numeracy tools organiza-on strategies memory strategies study skills vocabulary

    Intensive literacy instruc-on that reinforces classroom instruc-on literacy interven-on, e.g., second shot

    Models of Providing Support

  • In Class Co-teaching (5 types)

    Teaching in Tandem Effec-ve Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom Wilson and Blednick, ASCD, 2011

    1 teach, support

    parallel groups

    sta-on teaching

    1 large group, 1 small group

    teaming

    Models of Providing Support

  • Co-teachers: When two teachers are in the room, they can

    Work from