BUDDHISM & BUDDHIST SCRIPTURES

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BUDDHISM & BUDDHIST SCRIPTURES. What pastoral carers need to know. Why do pastoral carers need to know about Buddhism and its Scriptures?. Pastoral carers are expected to offer a pastoral relationship to people of any Faith or no Faith - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • BUDDHISM & BUDDHIST SCRIPTURESWhat pastoral carers need to knowMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Why do pastoral carers need to know about Buddhism and its Scriptures?Pastoral carers are expected to offer a pastoral relationship to people of any Faith or no Faith

    Some people of no Faith are interested in Buddhism as a spiritual way of life

    There are many distinct Buddhists lineages

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Why do pastoral carers need to know about Buddhism and its Scriptures?Buddhism is the most rapidly growing Faith in Australia, especially among the youth and young adults. Youth and young adults are a particularly challenging group to offer pastoral care toPastoral carers need to be able to explain to Christian parents and to other Christians why Buddhism is so attractiveMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • What is Buddhism?A path to enlightenmentIt was founded in India about 525 B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama who achieved enlightenment at the age of 40 and then spent 45 years teaching and establishing a community of monks and nuns (sangha) to continue his work. He is known as the Buddha.

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • What is Buddhism?Enlightenment means Perfect wisdom which knows all existence without obscurationPerfect compassion which pervades equally to all living beingsPerfect capacity to be able to benefit others according to their needs

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • What is Buddhism?A particular way of understanding experience A set of beliefs about the nature of existence (cause and effect rather than a Creator God )An ethical framework to live by. Spiritual practice a graduated path to enlightenmentMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Two Buddhist traditionsTheravada (Foundational Vehicle or Doctrine of the Elders) in Sri Lanka and S.E. Asia The Mahayana (Great Vehicle) in China, Mongolia. Korea, and Japan. Vajrayana (Diamond Vehicle) is an additional Mahayana lineage practiced in Tibet, Bhutan, Mongolia

    (Buddhists self-identify their school similar to the way Christians self-identify their broad orientation (viz., Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox)MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • What distinguishes the schools of Buddhism?The Foundational Vehicle is representative of early Buddhist doctrine viz., the ideal of the perfected saintly sage or arhat, who attained liberation by purifying self of all defilements and desires.

    The goal of the Great Vehicle is to achieve enlightenment for the benefit of all sentient beings. Its chief religious ideal is the bodhisattva who strives to perfect generosity, morality, patience, effort, concentration, wisdom.

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • First Teaching of the BuddhaThe Four Noble Truths was the Buddhas first teaching and is the foundation of all Buddhist practiceThe truth of Suffering (3 types)The Origin of suffering (karma and delusion)The truth of Cessation (ignorance is root)The truth of the Path (5 paths accumulation, preparation, seeing, meditation, no more learning)

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Samsara, Nirvana, EnlightenmentSamsara. Continual cycle of birth-and-death with the momentum to rebirth provided by ones delusion and previous karma. Nirvana Absence of delusion. Liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth and associated suffering. Enlightenment Perfected wisdom, compassion and capacityMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist understanding of experienceThe mind that which is clear and knowingThe intrinsic nature of mind is pure. Disturbing emotions are temporary flaws which bring about the loss of mental peaceFreedom from suffering is achieved by removing the disturbing emotions and obscurations

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist understanding of experienceForm physical bodyFeeling mind which experiences feelingsDiscrimination mind which distinguishes and comprehends objectsCompositional factors mind that holds the object eg intentionConsciousness primary mind consciousness that know the objectMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist belief about existenceNature of thingsWrong ViewImpermanentGrasp at things as permanentSufferingSeeing things as cause of happiness and sufferingEmptyGrasping at permanent independent unitary selfSelflessBelieving things exist independently and from their own side

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist PreceptsRefuge to not harm others

    5 lay precepts refrain from taking life, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, taking intoxicants *

    Like Christian monks and nuns, the lives of members of Buddhist monastic orders are regulated by a large number of rules (know as the Pratimoksa)

    * Note the similarities with Judaism, Christianity, and IslamMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist spiritual practiceThought transformation (cherishing others, disciplining disturbing emotions eg attachment)Generating faith (using images, visualizations)Making offerings and practicing generosityObserving moralityPrayer (Buddhas name, mantras, sutras, pujas, dedication)Mind training (hearing, contemplating, meditating)Confessing and Rejoicing

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist Scriptures There is no one universal set of scripture throughout all of Buddhism. Most traditions have a tripitaka (a Sanskrit word meaning three baskets)The vinaya pitaka (discipline and rules for monks and nuns) The sutra pitaka (sermons and teachings about the Buddha)The abhidharma pitaka (structured presentation of Buddhist teachings)

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist hermeneutics

    1. StudyA practitioners first task is to understand the Buddhas teachings by relying on both the written and oral lineages. Practitioners study or memorize the written texts and receive commentaries on these from qualified teachers. MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist hermeneutics

    2. Reflect The practitioner then uses techniques such as debate, discussion and or analytical meditation to discover the meaning of the teaching as relevant to his or her own experience and to increase familiarity with the topic.

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist hermeneutics contd3. Meditation

    The third stage of the process is to develop calm abiding (the ability to hold the mind single pointedly on the object of meditation) and single pointed concentration (the ability to analyze the object while holding the mind single pointedly on it.

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Buddhist hermeneutics contdThe Mahayana practitioner has two aspirationsTo fulfill the purpose of othersTo achieve enlightenment

    Listening reflecting and meditating are used to develop :Compassion focusing on sentient beingsWisdom focusing on enlightenment

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Examples of Buddhist practiceThought transformation (cherishing others, disciplining disturbing emotions eg attachment)Generating faith (using images, visualizations)Making offerings and practicing generosityObserving moralityPrayer (Buddhas name, mantras, sutras, pujas, dedication)Mind training (hearing, contemplating, meditating)Confessing and Rejoicing

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

  • Spiritual FormationDo not commit any non virtuous deeds. Collect all virtuous qualities.Completely transform your mind. This is the teaching of the Buddha

    Be kind as much as possible: it is always possible. His Holiness the Dalia LamaMACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    MACCM.Buddhism.5/3/13.RGP.v1

    Karma virtuous and non virtuous actions of body speech and mind. Propelling karma throws one into a particular form of rebirth. Completing karma results in experiences within a rebirthDelusion or disturbing emotions are temporary flaws which bring about the loss of mental peaceIgnorance mental states that misconstrue or lack understanding of the nature of things

    *