Treasures of Tibetan Art: Collections of the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Artby Barbara Lipton; Nima Dorjee Ragnubs

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<ul><li><p>Treasures of Tibetan Art: Collections of the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art byBarbara Lipton; Nima Dorjee RagnubsReview by: E. G.Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 120, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 2000), p. 497Published by: American Oriental SocietyStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/606056 .Accessed: 13/06/2014 20:46</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>American Oriental Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Journal ofthe American Oriental Society.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 185.2.32.89 on Fri, 13 Jun 2014 20:46:48 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=aoshttp://www.jstor.org/stable/606056?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>Brief Reviews of Books Brief Reviews of Books Brief Reviews of Books Brief Reviews of Books Brief Reviews of Books </p><p>As is customary for the publications of the Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, the presentation is impeccable. The Western reader can only be envious of the resources that have been so generously expended on what would doubtless here be considered a rather recondite subject. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Golden Letters: Writing Traditions of Indonesia. By ANNABEL TEH GALLOP, assisted by BERNARD ARPS. London: THE BRITISH LIBRARY, 1991. Pp. 152 (paper). </p><p>This is the catalogue of an exhibition of Indonesian manu- </p><p>scripts held in British libraries that toured various Indonesian cities in 1990 and 1991-some, however, saw only photographs of the manuscripts. The items were selected chiefly for their </p><p>calligraphy and illuminations. Two date from the seventeenth </p><p>century, but most are in the nature of official communications from various local potentates to Sir Thomas Raffles, Lieutenant Governor of Java (1811-16) and of Bengkulu (1818-24). The </p><p>catalogue, patronized by a Who's Who of British business in- terests in Indonesia, is sumptuous. In addition to the reproduc- tions and conspectus, there are appended a transliteration of the letters, biographical sketches of major collectors, and a short </p><p>bibliography. </p><p>As is customary for the publications of the Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, the presentation is impeccable. The Western reader can only be envious of the resources that have been so generously expended on what would doubtless here be considered a rather recondite subject. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Golden Letters: Writing Traditions of Indonesia. By ANNABEL TEH GALLOP, assisted by BERNARD ARPS. London: THE BRITISH LIBRARY, 1991. Pp. 152 (paper). </p><p>This is the catalogue of an exhibition of Indonesian manu- </p><p>scripts held in British libraries that toured various Indonesian cities in 1990 and 1991-some, however, saw only photographs of the manuscripts. The items were selected chiefly for their </p><p>calligraphy and illuminations. Two date from the seventeenth </p><p>century, but most are in the nature of official communications from various local potentates to Sir Thomas Raffles, Lieutenant Governor of Java (1811-16) and of Bengkulu (1818-24). The </p><p>catalogue, patronized by a Who's Who of British business in- terests in Indonesia, is sumptuous. In addition to the reproduc- tions and conspectus, there are appended a transliteration of the letters, biographical sketches of major collectors, and a short </p><p>bibliography. </p><p>As is customary for the publications of the Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, the presentation is impeccable. The Western reader can only be envious of the resources that have been so generously expended on what would doubtless here be considered a rather recondite subject. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Golden Letters: Writing Traditions of Indonesia. By ANNABEL TEH GALLOP, assisted by BERNARD ARPS. London: THE BRITISH LIBRARY, 1991. Pp. 152 (paper). </p><p>This is the catalogue of an exhibition of Indonesian manu- </p><p>scripts held in British libraries that toured various Indonesian cities in 1990 and 1991-some, however, saw only photographs of the manuscripts. The items were selected chiefly for their </p><p>calligraphy and illuminations. Two date from the seventeenth </p><p>century, but most are in the nature of official communications from various local potentates to Sir Thomas Raffles, Lieutenant Governor of Java (1811-16) and of Bengkulu (1818-24). The </p><p>catalogue, patronized by a Who's Who of British business in- terests in Indonesia, is sumptuous. In addition to the reproduc- tions and conspectus, there are appended a transliteration of the letters, biographical sketches of major collectors, and a short </p><p>bibliography. </p><p>As is customary for the publications of the Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, the presentation is impeccable. The Western reader can only be envious of the resources that have been so generously expended on what would doubtless here be considered a rather recondite subject. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Golden Letters: Writing Traditions of Indonesia. By ANNABEL TEH GALLOP, assisted by BERNARD ARPS. London: THE BRITISH LIBRARY, 1991. Pp. 152 (paper). </p><p>This is the catalogue of an exhibition of Indonesian manu- </p><p>scripts held in British libraries that toured various Indonesian cities in 1990 and 1991-some, however, saw only photographs of the manuscripts. The items were selected chiefly for their </p><p>calligraphy and illuminations. Two date from the seventeenth </p><p>century, but most are in the nature of official communications from various local potentates to Sir Thomas Raffles, Lieutenant Governor of Java (1811-16) and of Bengkulu (1818-24). The </p><p>catalogue, patronized by a Who's Who of British business in- terests in Indonesia, is sumptuous. In addition to the reproduc- tions and conspectus, there are appended a transliteration of the letters, biographical sketches of major collectors, and a short </p><p>bibliography. </p><p>As is customary for the publications of the Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, the presentation is impeccable. The Western reader can only be envious of the resources that have been so generously expended on what would doubtless here be considered a rather recondite subject. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Golden Letters: Writing Traditions of Indonesia. By ANNABEL TEH GALLOP, assisted by BERNARD ARPS. London: THE BRITISH LIBRARY, 1991. Pp. 152 (paper). </p><p>This is the catalogue of an exhibition of Indonesian manu- </p><p>scripts held in British libraries that toured various Indonesian cities in 1990 and 1991-some, however, saw only photographs of the manuscripts. The items were selected chiefly for their </p><p>calligraphy and illuminations. Two date from the seventeenth </p><p>century, but most are in the nature of official communications from various local potentates to Sir Thomas Raffles, Lieutenant Governor of Java (1811-16) and of Bengkulu (1818-24). The </p><p>catalogue, patronized by a Who's Who of British business in- terests in Indonesia, is sumptuous. In addition to the reproduc- tions and conspectus, there are appended a transliteration of the letters, biographical sketches of major collectors, and a short </p><p>bibliography. </p><p>Classical Dance and Theatre in South-East Asia. By JUKKA O. MIETTINEN. New York: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1992. </p><p>Pp. xx + 175. $75. </p><p>This is a lavishly illustrated survey of the "dance traditions" of Burma, Thailand, Java, Bali, Cambodia (with Laos and Ma- laysia), and Vietnam. To each situs a separate chapter is de- voted. Another chapter is reserved to the Chinese theatrical tradition, as a component of local traditions throughout the region. The individual treatments cover the various forms of theatre (including puppet theatre), its mis-en-scene, and histor- ical development. As can be well imagined, the whole is broad but not very deep. It will serve admirably anyone wishing a comprehensive introduction to this vast subject (or subjects). A brief bibliography and index are provided. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Classical Dance and Theatre in South-East Asia. By JUKKA O. MIETTINEN. New York: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1992. </p><p>Pp. xx + 175. $75. </p><p>This is a lavishly illustrated survey of the "dance traditions" of Burma, Thailand, Java, Bali, Cambodia (with Laos and Ma- laysia), and Vietnam. To each situs a separate chapter is de- voted. Another chapter is reserved to the Chinese theatrical tradition, as a component of local traditions throughout the region. The individual treatments cover the various forms of theatre (including puppet theatre), its mis-en-scene, and histor- ical development. As can be well imagined, the whole is broad but not very deep. It will serve admirably anyone wishing a comprehensive introduction to this vast subject (or subjects). A brief bibliography and index are provided. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Classical Dance and Theatre in South-East Asia. By JUKKA O. MIETTINEN. New York: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1992. </p><p>Pp. xx + 175. $75. </p><p>This is a lavishly illustrated survey of the "dance traditions" of Burma, Thailand, Java, Bali, Cambodia (with Laos and Ma- laysia), and Vietnam. To each situs a separate chapter is de- voted. Another chapter is reserved to the Chinese theatrical tradition, as a component of local traditions throughout the region. The individual treatments cover the various forms of theatre (including puppet theatre), its mis-en-scene, and histor- ical development. As can be well imagined, the whole is broad but not very deep. It will serve admirably anyone wishing a comprehensive introduction to this vast subject (or subjects). A brief bibliography and index are provided. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Classical Dance and Theatre in South-East Asia. By JUKKA O. MIETTINEN. New York: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1992. </p><p>Pp. xx + 175. $75. </p><p>This is a lavishly illustrated survey of the "dance traditions" of Burma, Thailand, Java, Bali, Cambodia (with Laos and Ma- laysia), and Vietnam. To each situs a separate chapter is de- voted. Another chapter is reserved to the Chinese theatrical tradition, as a component of local traditions throughout the region. The individual treatments cover the various forms of theatre (including puppet theatre), its mis-en-scene, and histor- ical development. As can be well imagined, the whole is broad but not very deep. It will serve admirably anyone wishing a comprehensive introduction to this vast subject (or subjects). A brief bibliography and index are provided. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Classical Dance and Theatre in South-East Asia. By JUKKA O. MIETTINEN. New York: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1992. </p><p>Pp. xx + 175. $75. </p><p>This is a lavishly illustrated survey of the "dance traditions" of Burma, Thailand, Java, Bali, Cambodia (with Laos and Ma- laysia), and Vietnam. To each situs a separate chapter is de- voted. Another chapter is reserved to the Chinese theatrical tradition, as a component of local traditions throughout the region. The individual treatments cover the various forms of theatre (including puppet theatre), its mis-en-scene, and histor- ical development. As can be well imagined, the whole is broad but not very deep. It will serve admirably anyone wishing a comprehensive introduction to this vast subject (or subjects). A brief bibliography and index are provided. </p><p>E. G. </p><p>Dictionary of Traditional South-East Asian Theatre. By GHULAM-SARWAR YOUSOF. Kuala Lumpur: OXFORD UNI- VERSITY PRESS, 1994. Pp. 327. $32 (paper). </p><p>Dictionary of Traditional South-East Asian Theatre. By GHULAM-SARWAR YOUSOF. Kuala Lumpur: OXFORD UNI- VERSITY PRESS, 1994. Pp. 327. $32 (paper). </p><p>Dictionary of Traditional South-East Asian Theatre. By GHULAM-SARWAR YOUSOF. Kuala Lumpur: OXFORD UNI- VERSITY PRESS, 1994. Pp. 327. $32 (paper). </p><p>Dictionary of Traditional South-East Asian Theatre. By GHULAM-SARWAR YOUSOF. Kuala Lumpur: OXFORD UNI- VERSITY PRESS, 1994. Pp. 327. $32 (paper). </p><p>Dictionary of Traditional South-East Asian Theatre. By GHULAM-SARWAR YOUSOF. Kuala Lumpur: OXFORD UNI- VERSITY PRESS, 1994. Pp. 327. $32 (paper). </p><p>The present dictionary, the "first of its kind," complements the work reviewed above, and covers approximately the same </p><p>geographical area, adding the Philippines. The focus is general, and many contemporary subjects are included. But the past is not neglected-for instance, the entry Mahabharata (sic-dia- critics, as in Malay, are not used) receives over five full pages, and includes even a precis of the eighteen books. Of course, the </p><p>emphasis is on the reception of the Mahabharata-Indianists </p><p>may find some of the views expressed rather quaint, but always interesting. Entries cover not only the types, sources, and means of theatrical representation, but include many biographical no- tices. There are close to one hundred illustrations, some taking up half a page. The author was at one time associated with James Brandon, of the University of Hawaii, and evidently shares the latter's love of Asian theatre. It is clear that this book belongs in </p><p>any major reference library. E. G. </p><p>Treasures of Tibetan Art: Collections of the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art. By BARBARA LIPTON and NIMA DORJEE RAGNUBS. Oxford: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1996. Pp. xviii + 295. $29.95 (paper). </p><p>The present dictionary, the "first of its kind," complements the work reviewed above, and covers approximately the same </p><p>geographical area, adding the Philippines. The focus is general, and many contemporary subjects are included. But the past is not neglected-for instance, the entry Mahabharata (sic-dia- critics, as in Malay, are not used) receives over five full pages, and includes even a precis of the eighteen books. Of course, the </p><p>emphasis is on the reception of the Mahabharata-Indianists </p><p>may find some of the views expressed rather quaint, but always interesting. Entries cover not only the types, sources, and means of theatrical representation, but include many biographical no- tices. There are close to one hundred illustrations, some taking up half a page. The author was at one time associated with James Brandon, of the University of Hawaii, and evidently shares the latter's love of Asian theatre. It is clear that this book belongs in </p><p>any major reference library. E. G. </p><p>Treasures of Tibetan Art: Collections of the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art. By BARBARA LIPTON and NIMA DORJEE RAGNUBS. Oxford: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1996. Pp. xviii + 295. $29.95 (paper). </p><p>The present dictionary, the "first of its kind," complements the work reviewed above, and covers approximately the same </p><p>geographical area, adding the Philippines. The focus is general, and many contemporary subjects are included. But the past is not neglected-for instance, the entry Mahabharata (sic-dia- critics, as in Malay, are not used) receives ov...</p></li></ul>

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