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  • What Every Member of the Trade Community Should Know About:

    Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or

    Steel

    AN INFORMED COMPLIANCE PUBLICATION

    MARCH 2010

  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

    NOTICE:

    This publication is intended to provide guidance and information to the trade community. It reflects the position on or interpretation of the applicable laws or regulations by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) as of the date of publication, which is shown on the front cover. It does not in any way replace or supersede those laws or regulations. Only the latest official version of the laws or regulations is authoritative.

    Publication History

    First Published: May 2006

    Reviewed With No Changes February 2008 Revised March 2010

    PRINTING NOTE: This publication was designed for electronic distribution via the CBP website (http://www.cbp.gov) and is being distributed in a variety of formats. It was originally set up in Microsoft Word 2003. Pagination and margins in downloaded versions may vary depending upon which word processor or printer you use. If you wish to maintain the original settings, you may wish to download the .pdf version, which can then be printed using the freely available Adobe Acrobat Reader.

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  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

    PREFACE On December 8, 1993, Title VI of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 103-182, 107 Stat. 2057), also known as the Customs Modernization or Mod Act, became effective. These provisions amended many sections of the Tariff Act of 1930 and related laws. Two new concepts that emerge from the Mod Act are informed compliance and shared responsibility, which are premised on the idea that in order to maximize voluntary compliance with laws and regulations of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the trade community needs to be clearly and completely informed of its legal obligations. Accordingly, the Mod Act imposes a greater obligation on CBP to provide the public with improved information concerning the trade community's rights and responsibilities under customs regulations and related laws. In addition, both the trade and U.S. Customs and Border Protection share responsibility for carrying out these requirements. For example, under Section 484 of the Tariff Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1484), the importer of record is responsible for using reasonable care to enter, classify and determine the value of imported merchandise and to provide any other information necessary to enable U.S. Customs and Border Protection to properly assess duties, collect accurate statistics, and determine whether other applicable legal requirements, if any, have been met. CBP is then responsible for fixing the final classification and value of the merchandise. An importer of records failure to exercise reasonable care could delay release of the merchandise and, in some cases, could result in the imposition of penalties. Regulations and Rulings (RR) of the Office of International Trade has been given a major role in meeting the informed compliance responsibilities of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. In order to provide information to the public, CBP has issued a series of informed compliance publications on new or revised requirements, regulations or procedures, and a variety of classification and valuation issues. This publication, prepared by the National Commodity Specialist Division of Regulations and Rulings is entitled "Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel. It provides guidance regarding the classification of these items. We sincerely hope that this material, together with seminars and increased access to rulings of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, will help the trade community to improve voluntary compliance with customs laws and to understand the relevant administrative processes. The material in this publication is provided for general information purposes only. Because many complicated factors can be involved in customs issues, an importer may wish to obtain a ruling under Regulations of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 19 C.F.R. Part 177, or to obtain advice from an expert who specializes in customs matters, for example, a licensed customs broker, attorney or consultant. Comments and suggestions are welcomed and should be addressed to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of International Trade, Executive Director, Regulations and Rulings, 799 9th Street N.W. 7th floor, Washington, D.C. 20229-1177.

    Sandra L. Bell Executive Director, Regulations and Rulings Office of International Trade

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  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

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  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

    INTRODUCTION..........................................................................................7

    SUBHEADINGS OF 7312............................................................................7 .................................................................................................. 8 1. STRANDED WIRE:

    2. ROPES, CABLES and CORDAGE......................................................................... 14 ................................................................................................................... 17 3. OTHER

    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION...................................................................19 ................................................................................................................ 19 The Internet

    ................................................................................................. 19 Customs Regulations........................................................................................................ 19 Customs Bulletin

    ................................................................................. 20 Importing into the United States............................................................................. 20 Informed Compliance Publications

    ...................................................................................................... 21 Value Publications................................................................................. 22 Your Comments are Important

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  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

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  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

    INTRODUCTION This Informed Compliance Publication (ICP) proposes to explore the complexities of the tariff nomenclature containing stranded wire, rope and cable, of iron or steel. Technical terms will be defined, industry standards will be identified and the scope of the relevant heading and subheadings will be clarified. This is necessary to ensure both a uniform and consistent method of classification. Specifically, this ICP deals solely with the merchandise of Heading 7312, which reads: Stranded wire, ropes, cables, plaited bands, slings and the like, of iron or steel, not electrically insulated. The heading includes such wire strand, ropes, cables, bands, whether or not they are cut to length, or fitted with hooks, spring hooks, swivels, rings, thimbles, clips, sockets, etc. (provided that they do not thereby assume the character of articles of other headings), or made up into single or multiple slings, strops, etc. These goods are used in a variety of applications such as hoisting (with cranes, winches, pulleys, lifts, etc.), mining, quarrying, shipping, hauling or towing, as hawsers, as transmission belting, as rigging or guying, or as strand for fencing or stone sawing. Pursuant to Section XV, Note 2(a) of the HTSUS, articles of Heading 7312 are considered parts of general use. If, however, further processing of the articles, including the addition of special end terminations, dedicates them for use with articles of other headings, they assume the character of those articles and are excluded from Heading 7312. SUBHEADINGS OF 7312 Although the aforementioned products are all included in one heading, it requires 22 different 10-digit subheadings under 7312.10, as well as subheading 7312.90.00 to provide for their tariff classification. All of these subheadings can be categorized into three main subdivisions:

    1) Stranded wire 2) Ropes, cables and cordage 3) Other

    The following will provide a detailed explanation of the scope of these 23 10-digit subheading breakouts. Throughout this ICP, it will be necessary to define certain technical terms to better understand the provisionary language of Heading 7312.

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  • Stranded Wire, Rope and Cable, of Iron or Steel March 2010

    1. STRANDED WIRE: 7312.10: Stranded wire, ropes, cables, plaited bands, slings and the like, of iron or steel, not electrically insulated: Stranded wire, ropes and cables: Stranded wire CLASSIFICATION OF STRANDED WIRE Subheadings 7312.10.05 thru 7312.10.30

    DEFINITIONS As defined in Chapter 73, Legal Note 2, the word wire means hot or cold-formed products of any cross-sectional shape, of which no cross-sectional dimension exceeds 16 mm. The particular design of a wire strand, wire rope or cable is referred to as its construction and is used to describe the number of wires contained in a given product and their relationships to each other. The composition of a product refers to the material used to manufacture it. Most wire strand, wire rope and cable are made from various grades of both stainless and carbon steels. The term stranded wire, often referred to as wire strand, is defined as two or more wires wound concentrically in a helix which are usually wound around a center wi

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