mountain goats and helicopters: implications for heliportable geophysical activities jeff matheson,...

Download Mountain Goats and Helicopters: Implications for Heliportable Geophysical Activities Jeff Matheson, Clint Smyth & Bill Nalder EBA Waberski Darrow Ltd

Post on 16-Dec-2015

213 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1
  • Mountain Goats and Helicopters: Implications for Heliportable Geophysical Activities Jeff Matheson, Clint Smyth & Bill Nalder EBA Waberski Darrow Ltd.
  • Slide 2
  • EBA Goat Study Outline A couple of pics illustrating talk Project Background Goat Responses to Heli Implications Recommendations
  • Slide 3
  • EBA Goat Study OJAY Area OJAY O&G Development Area Veritas 3-D Seismic Program
  • Slide 4
  • EBA Goat Study Canyon-Dwelling Goats Belcourt Creek Wapiti River Mistanusk Creek ? ? Goat range? Impacts of helicopters?
  • Slide 5
  • EBA Goat Study Solution VeritasOGC EBAWLAP Goat Inventory & Operational Monitoring
  • Slide 6
  • EBA Goat Study Objectives Protect mountain goats Determine distribution and habitat use Helicopter disturbance distance? Disturbance reduction/mitigation? Refine guidelines and regulations
  • Slide 7
  • EBA Goat Study Inventory - Aerial Aerial Survey
  • Slide 8
  • EBA Goat Study Inventory - Ground Ground Transects
  • Slide 9
  • EBA Goat Study Inventory Results
  • Slide 10
  • EBA Goat Study How many goats? Aerial Survey
  • Slide 11
  • EBA Goat Study How many goats? Ground Surveys Over 10 Days
  • Slide 12
  • EBA Goat Study Heliportable 3-D Seismic Source and receiving lines Low-impact, hand-cut seismic lines Heliportable drilling Recording equipment drop-off and pick-up
  • Slide 13
  • EBA Goat Study Heliportable Drilling
  • Slide 14
  • EBA Goat Study Recording Equipment
  • Slide 15
  • EBA Goat Study Protocol (1) 1. Search for Goats 2. Begin Monitoring for Baseline Behaviour
  • Slide 16
  • EBA Goat Study Protocol (2) 3. Commence Aerial Operations 4. Constant Contact With Heli and Ground Crews
  • Slide 17
  • EBA Goat Study Protocol (3) 5. Record Behavioural Responses to Heli Distance 6. Terminate Operations if Goats Stressed
  • Slide 18
  • EBA Goat Study Protocol (4) Helicopters began working far from goats and gradually moved closer. Disturbance was intermittent.
  • Slide 19
  • EBA Goat Study Behavioural Responses R1No overt response R2Unconcerned response R3Curious response R4Concerned response R5Low alarm response R6High alarm response
  • Slide 20
  • EBA Goat Study Monitoring Results (1)
  • Slide 21
  • EBA Goat Study Monitoring Results (2) Increased levels of alarm and flight at helicopter distance under 1000m. Cases of helicopters operating at close range (less than 500m) with little or no apparent concern by goats. Careful control of helicopter movements. Termination of helicopter use to minimise negative responses.
  • Slide 22
  • EBA Goat Study Monitoring Results (3) Few negative responses Topography has a big effect Sudden close range flight resulted in high negative response. In general, goat responses less than other studies. Why? Close management of heli movements Acclimation period Canyon topography
  • Slide 23
  • EBA Goat Study Conclusions Helicopters can operate close to goats, provided there is operational monitoring. Avoid sudden close helicopter flights and begin working far from goats with a slow progression. Better to have longer duration, slower flights that might allow habituation.
  • Slide 24
  • EBA Goat Study Recommendations 1000m buffer no-fly zone from high use area, unless goats are monitored. For Canyon-Dwelling Goats What about high-elevation alpine goats?
  • Slide 25
  • EBA Goat Study Canyon versus Alpine
  • Slide 26
  • EBA Goat Study High Use Goat Areas
  • Slide 27
  • EBA Goat Study Acknowledgements Bill Nalder, Roberta Parson, Darren Schmidt, Jeff Matheson, Steve Moore, Clint Smyth, Derek Ebner and Karla Langlois Ed Schreuder of Veritas Energy Services Ltd. Dave Robinson of Time Seismic Exchange Ltd. Darrell Daniels of Complete Land Services Ltd. Derek Doyle of the Oil and Gas Commission for their support in this project. Drillers and helicopter pilots.