frock magazine 2011

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Frock Paper Scissor's Sixth Issue

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  • Through forward-looking courses, practice-led research and a proven track record in growingcreative enterprises, QUT is leading the way in creative industries. A variety of courses inperforming arts, production, design, writing and communication from bachelor degrees to PhDlevel are offered including Queenslands only bachelor degree in fashion.

    More informationPhone (07) 3138 8114, email creativeindustries@qut.edu.auor visit www.qut.edu.au/creative-industries.

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    Create the future with us

  • FROCK PAPER SCISSORS 2011

    PHOTOGRAPHY Elisabeth Willis

    Editors MADISON DRABBLE & MEAGAN LAWRENCE Online Editor SUSAN HAINES

    Online Deputy Editor TESS CAMERON

    FASHION & BEAUTYFashion Editors ALICIA COLEMAN & SHEA CAMERON

    Fashion Assistant KASEY TWIDALEStylist HANNAH OCALLAGHAN

    Mens Fashion Editor SAM ALDENTONBeauty & Lifestyle Editor ANJALI RAJ

    Online Fashion Editors JACQUELINE ALLAN & TERRI CHALMERSOnline Beauty & Lifestyle Editor MELISSA RASMUSSEN

    LAYOUT & DESIGNCreative Director SONIA KWEK

    Layout & Design Editor LAUREN GIBSONLayout & Design Team MICHELLE THOMAS & REBECCA PITT

    Web Construction SOPHIA MARY MCDERMOTT & LARA SALAMEH

    ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONSAdvertising & Distribution Manager MADELINE PLUNKETT

    Assistant Advertising & Distribution GENEVIEVE CHANPublic Relations Manager BIANCA RIDGE

    Assistant Public Relations Manager KATELAN SWEENEYSocial Media Manager TENGKU NUR MARIAM

    Videographer ESTHER LOKE

    Amber Gerrad-Maxwell, Ashley Tucker, Christina Papa, Dusty Ansell, Ellie McKay, Hayley Elsaesser, Emma Bedsor, Krissie Rogers, Lauren Maugham,

    Lisa Maynard, Lucinda Hunter, Marie Tolland, Marianna Economous, Rachel Mellers, Sam Aldenton, Skye Kerr, Sonia Kwek, Sophie Kassay,

    Susan Haines, Tanya Wakeley, Vela Krachangloke, Winona Davis

    MAGAZINE CONTRIBUTORS

    Alicia Coleman, Anjali Raj, Annalise Tromans, Amber Gerrard-Maxwell, Ana Armesto, Amy Boughen, Belinda Hall, Caitlin Moriarty, Christina Papa, Christine Conlon, Ellen-Marie Elliot, Emma Reid, Felicity Shield, Genevieve Chan, Jieun Heo, Hannah OCallaghan, Isabelle McGreevy,

    Jackalyn Byrne, Jacqueline Allan, Kasey Twidale, Katelen Sweeny, Katherine Hill, Krissie Rogers, Kristal Choi, Laura Templeton, Lauren

    Gibson, Lauren Maughan, Lisa Maynard, Leonie Smith, Marguerite Boase, Marianna Tigani, Marie Tolland, Marilyn Hunt, Marlise Newell, Megan Staller, Melissa Rasmussen, Michelle Lamont, Michelle Thomas, Nicole,

    Smyth, Paige Ross, Pollyanna Gardner, Sara Cowling, Sian Campbell, Sophie Kassay, Susan Haines, Shabnam Khan, Stephanie Hyland, Sunghyun

    Kim, Tina Son, Winona Davis, Tanya Wakeley, Terri Chalmers, Tess Cameron, Zoe Mellick

    WEBSITE CONTRIBUTORS

    Amy Boughen, Andre Cois, Ashleigh Hansen, Belinda Hall, Elizabeth Grinter, Elisabeth Willis, Freya Lamont, Fraser Stanly, Greg Sullavan,

    Kerena Nuttall, Kiran Raj, Liam ODonnell, Shaelah Ariotti, Zoe Mathers

    CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

    Features Editor SIAN CAMPBELLChief Sub Editor MARIANNA ECONOMOUS

    Online Features Editor ZOE MELLICKOnline Chief Sub Editor ASHLEY TUCKEROnline News Editor MARGUERITE BOASE Features Photographer TANYA WAKELEY

    FEATURES

    Kay McMahon & Erica Bartlek.mcmahon@qut.edu.au

    MANAGING EDITORS

  • FROCK

    60 DIY Beauty

    63 Fed Up

    64 To Be, But What To Be?

    66 Baby Steps to Big Business

    68 Suite Designs

    71 Little Lane That Could

    73 Raising The Bar

    BEAUTY &LIFESTYLE

    48 Lone Rider

    54 The Heritarian Man

    56 The Devils In The Detail

    58 No Junk Male

    MAN

    28 Print Play

    34 The Huntress

    38 The City Called Me So I Came

    42 Be My, Be My Summer Love

    FASHION

    08 All Keyed Up

    10 A Burning Issue

    12 A Pattern For Success

    15 Brisbane To Big Apple

    16 Great Fashion Escape

    19 In With The Old, Out With The New 20 Stitch n Bitch

    21 A Dress A Day 22 Model Citizens

    24 Double Exposure

    26 Power To The People

    FEATURES contents

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    48

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    www.frockpaperscissors.com

  • This year, FROCK PAPER SCISSORS has turned its focus to identity, and how its progressive formation reflects and defines our individuality. Similar to how language, gender, beliefs and experience form individual identity, the FROCK identity has, throughout its short existence, been shaped by those who have impressed their own ideas and influence to its pages each year.

    The sixth edition, entitled Go Your Own Way, is a testament to the impressionable souls of life the adventurers; the risk-takers; the collective of individuals who have strayed from the garden path and are changing the way we think and act, often without even knowing it.

    Two such people are Sarah Owen and Maxine Thompson from QUT to NYC, they have taken the leap into new territory and are making their mark on the international fashion industry (see Brisbane To Big Apple, page 15).

    As we all know (and often learn the hard way), stepping out on your own isnt always easy. In To Be, But What To Be? (page 64), we look at the sometimes uneasy transition from adolescence to adulthood, before celebrating those who have found their footing and have championed their respective industries in Baby Steps To Big Business (page 66). We also explore the ever-evolving identity of fashion, and how innovations in technology are shaping the current industry (see All Keyed Up, page 8 and Power To The People, page 26).

    The sixth issue of FROCK is for no one and everyone; for those who inspire and aspire; for those who take a chance and dance to their own tune. As the magazine continues to grow and define itself each year, we hope you too will be able to define your identity and ultimately, your future. Go your own way

    ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Elisabeth Willis

    STYLING & MAKE-UP Hannah OCallaghanHAIR Tahnee Higgins

    MODEL Elizabeth OCallaghanGARMENTS Fernando Frisoni from threadbare.co

    Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion.

    Jack Kerouac

    Madison Drabble & Meagan Lawrence

  • FROCKfeatures

    PHOTOGRAPHY Greg SullavanDESIGNER Stefanie ODea

    MODEL Ella Lethbridge

  • Theyre not designers, stylists, or magazine editors yet. The next generation of influential fashion forces are making their mark online, forcing a

    global industry to sit up and take notice.

    WORDS: ASHLEY TUCKER

    PHOTOGRAPHY Elisabeth WillisSTYLING & MAKE-UP Hannah OCallaghan

    HAIR Tahnee HigginsMODEL Elizabeth OCallaghan

  • So what has made the industry sit up and take notice? Surely it has to be more than Dolce & Gabbana mixing up the standard fashion hierarchy and putting four bloggers in the front row? While they might only be new to the blogging game, that doesnt mean theyre not savvy about it. Bloggers are aware they can do the one thing everyone wants to do these days: connect. They have seized the opportunities created by 21st century digital media interactive, globalised, multimodal and fast and energised a parallel force in fashion media. The typical online fashion blog offers fashionistas a completely different style of commentary about fashion, beauty and lifestyle, and gives them the opportunity to share their own opinions, tastes and obsessions something they cant do in the mainstream fashion media such as magazines. When I was a teenager, the only way to engage with fashion was to buy the monthly magazines, but even then, you were anonymous and had no input. You were trapped in the middle of nowhere, says 29-year-old blog consumer Jessica Williams who hails from small country town

    Malanda in Far North Queensland. Now you can be at home in your Abercrombie and Fitch pyjamas and still get the latest in fashion news from anywhere in the world. As long as youve got an Internet connection, you can be part of the conversation. Three years ago, 22-year-old Kobi Laganas website, You Want The Lowdown, bloomed into an Internet hit, connecting Lagana and her dreamy closet with a more fashion-conscious crowd. Lagana started her own blog, she says, to experiment with the medium, describing it as the pen and paper of our generation. Her blog is part style diary, part shopping wish list and part virtual inspiration board,

    featuring high and low mixes of international and local labels. She covers anything from a day out at Mount Cotton with Brisbane designer Benjamin Ringuet, to a favourite fashion magazine editorial. Lagana believes the recent explosion in the presence and popularity of fashion blogs is because people are interested in personal style. No matter what sartorial taste, people are inspired to read about the individual creativity it takes to pull a look together. Its not just readers who have a desire to connect bloggers are also driven by the engagement and responses they get from

    their followers. According to Vasili Kaliman, a blogger and social media expert from Melbourne, connecting with an audience and engaging in a discourse is something that is born from the desire to be heard. I think its an innate human need to have an audience for whatever it is that you do. The fact that you have an audience really compels you to keep on doing it. You realise youre not just whistling in the wind, youre actually doing something which people are finding value in, says Kaliman. As the inevitability of change besets the fashion industry, it seems no one can ignore the power of the fashion blog. Users are engaging with the fashion