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HI-Arts are delighted to be able to showcase Highland creativity through this brochure on craft for the home, produced to support our programme at Scotland’s Housing Expo 2010.

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  • PUBLISHED BY HI-ARTS 2010 | FREE

    commissioning craft

    COMMISSIONyour DREAM

    make your home U N I Q U E

  • The Highlands and Islands of Scotland have provided a natural home for craft for many years inspiring makers through the beauty of the environment, history and wealth of natural materials. There are makers working in ceramics, furniture and wood, glass, jewellery and metalwork, lettering, musical instruments, paper, textiles and basketmaking.

    Craft is an integral part of the economic life of the Highlands, and the quality and diversity of work creates exciting opportunities for the future.

    HI-Arts are delighted to be able to showcase Highland creativity through this brochure on craft for the home, produced to support our programme at Scotlands Housing Expo 2010.

    Craft is something everyone should enjoy and buy to make their home unique!

    Pamela ConacherCraft Development Coordinator

    HI-Arts

    More details can be found on our

    website http://crafts.hi-arts.co.uk/

    W E L C O M E T O H I G H L A N D S & ISLANDS CRAFT

    HI-Arts Craft Development, Suites 4 & 5, Fourth Floor, Ballantyne House, 84 Academy Street, Inverness Tel: 01463 720886 Email: craft@hi-arts.co.uk Web: http://crafts.hi-arts.co.uk

    Brochure compiled by Tina Rose (editor Rio Magazine www.riomagazine.co.uk) with assistance from HI-Arts Craft Develpment

    Furniture featured on front cover: Wellington chest in walnut by Gavin Robertson (www.grfurniture.com)

    CONTENTS

    MAKE YOUR HOME UNIQUE

    3

    COMMISSION YOUR DREAM

    6

    FIVE TOP TIPS FOR

    COMMISSIONING 8

    CRAFT FOR THE PUBLIC

    9

    WHERE TOSEE, BUY &

    FIND OUT MORE10

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  • MAKEYOURHOMEUNIQUE

    All across the Highlands and Islands there is a wealth of creativity as artists working with different materials clay, glass, metal, textiles, wood, fibre, paper and resin explore ideas and skilfully make beautiful craft. They are inspired, often by the light and colour of the countryside, or the history and mythology, to create, many using the traditional indigenous skills of spinning, weaving, knitting, basketmaking and woodworking.

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  • (BUY CRAFT)

    They are always exploring new materials, as can be seen by the work of emerging young designer Nick Ross, who graduated from Grays School of Art in 2008. He has just returned to the Highlands after working in Europe, and his Lego chair reflects his design ethos of commenting on our ways of thinking about objects.

    There are many potteries based in the Highlands including the Bay Pottery on the Isle of Skye where Maggie Zerafa creates unique pieces influenced by Japanese traditions. In Ardersier Julia Smith sketches from nature, while Daniel Kavanagh in Nairn combines bronze and ceramic in sculptural pieces.

    Printed textiles by Phatsheep on Shetland, embroidered limited edition textiles by Jenny Deschenes in Spean Bridge, glass pieces by Sandie Gallagher, wood explorations by Alasdair McKay and silversmithing by Lucy Woodley in Tain, give just a flavour of the variety of work being made.

    The wonderful craft Highland makers create furniture, tableware, home accessories and unique objects - can be found and bought at galleries across the Highlands, as well as across the world.

    Owning something handmade is very special, with craft to suit every budget. It can remind you of a place or time, reflect your personality, but best of all, when you buy what you love it will give a feeling of pleasure every day.

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    CRAFT)4CRAFT)

  • (BUY CRAFT)

    Previous PageCeramic with bronze by Daniel Kavanagh (www.danielkavanagh.com) Photo: Ewen Weatherspoon

    This Spread1 Cushion by Jenny Deschenes (www.jendeschenes.co.uk) Photo: Fin Macrae2 Cushion by Phatsheep (www.phatsheep.co.uk)3 Lego chair by Nick Ross (www.nckrss.com)4 Tree cup by Julia Smith (www.juliasmithceramics.com)5 Rowan bowl and spoon by Lucy Woodley (www.lucywoodley.co.uk) Photo: Fin Macrae6 Rising II by Maggie Zerafa (www.baypottery.co.uk)7 Playing with the elements by Alisdair McKay (email: am3.9ky@virgin.net)8 Glass by Sandie Gallagher (email: sandieglass@yahoo.co.uk)

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  • Commissioning something unique for your home is an exciting opportunity to express your individuality. It can also be a lovely way to mark an occasion such as a wedding or retirement or to remember someone, and it creates an heirloom to pass on to the next generation.

    Furniture designer Gavin Robertson, who works mainly to commission, finds the experience very rewarding, and gets as much pleasure from it as the person who owns the finished piece. In his workshop above Loch Ness he makes a broad range of work from designer kitchens to bespoke pieces inspired by the construction and detail of the Arts and Crafts Movement.

    People that come to him for a commission are usually looking for something very individual, and if possible he likes to visit the home to see where the piece will be and discuss design ideas. He then produces a drawing, sometimes with a sample to demonstrate an inlay, and once this has been discussed a deposit is paid and the delivery date agreed. He always likes to include a wow factor, a detail that sets it apart from mass produced pieces.

    His advice to people thinking about commissioning is to have a good think in advance about materials, style, practical requirements, and to be realistic about the budget.

    Of course, commissions are not always for furniture. A woven hanging can bring warmth to a wall, and as most are unglazed they can happily be positioned opposite windows. Louise Oppenheimer, who lives in Kilmartin Glen, weaves designs with their roots in nature, their abstract patterns translating the essence of a place, perfect for a home environment.

    Another aspect of the home that lends itself to commissions is wall mounted tiles. Ceramicist Helen Michie makes either smoked or glazed large ceramic picture Raku fired tiles inspired by the sky, sea and landscape of Lochaber, with tiles in a similar style that are suitable or kitchens and bathrooms.

    Glass, ceramics, fabrics, furniture, there is an endless range of ways to commission something you will love living with and which perfectly suits your lifestyle.

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  • 1 WHY & WHERE?It is important to think carefully about any commission before you talk to a maker. What is it that you want to commission? Does it have to be used for any purpose? Where will it go in your home? Consider what style you like in your home and the materials. Take photos of the space/room where it will go. Look at interiors magazines and tear out photos of styles you like.

    2 MONEY TALKIt is always best to mention budgets at the very beginning of any commission as it can influence what materials are used and other aspects of how it is made. You want to make sure it will meet your expectations so you need to decide how much you can afford to spend.

    3 WHO?By this stage you have researched what you want and have an idea of style. You now need to research who could make this for you. There is lots of information online about makers directories, associations and individual websites (see page 11).

    Also visit galleries where you can see work by different makers, exhibitions and open studio events. If there are any makers who youre particularly interested in contact them to ask if they are exhibiting anywhere or visit their studios to see their work.

    4 WHAT & WHEN?Once you have chosen who to work with you need to brief them on what you want, style, materials and budget. Depending on what youre commissioning they may visit your home to see where it will go, but they can also work from photographs. They will then design a piece and provide you with drawings including size and materials, total costs and timing for delivery. If you want to see the work in progress now is the time to agree appointments. It is always best to have these details in writing and to have signed an order/contract once you have agreed everything.

    It is important to trust the maker you work with and to communicate, for example, only contact them to check progress if there is something you are worried about, and encourage the maker to let you know if there are delays for any reason.

    5 BEING CREATIVEOne of the most enjoyable things about commissioning is working with the maker to create something unique. Once you tell them your initial thoughts the maker will bring new ideas and together youll design and make something original which exactly matches your needs and home.

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