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  • ISSUE 78, 15 SEPTEMBER 2007biosecurity

    A PUBLICATION OF MAF BIOSECURITY NEW ZEALAND

    BiosecurityBiosecuritysciencescience

    Daniel Simberloff on invasive species

    Didymo science seminar

    Invasive ant workshop

    Biosecurityscience

  • contents

    44

    2 | MAF BIOSECURITY NEW ZEALAND | ISSUE 78

    21211111

    Biosecurity magazine

    Biosecurity is published six-weekly by MAF Biosecurity New Zealand, with regular input from the Department of Conservation, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Fisheries and regional councils. It is of special interest to all those with a stake in the protection of New Zealands economic, environmental and social assets from the dangers posed by pests and diseases. Animal welfare issues are also covered. The articles in this magazine do not necessarily refl ect government policy.

    For enquiries about specifi c articles, refer to the contact listed at the end of each article.

    General enquiries (e.g. circulation requests or information about MAF Biosecurity New Zealand):

    Biosecurity Magazine, MAF Biosecurity New Zealand, PO Box 2526, Pastoral House, 25 The Terrace, Wellington, New Zealand.

    Phone: 04 894 0100

    Fax: 04 894 0720

    Email: biosecurity@maf.govt.nz

    Internet: www.biosecurity.govt.nz

    Editorial enquiries:

    Editor: Phil Stewart

    Phone: 04 384 4688

    Email: biosecurity@wordpict.co.nz

    ISSN 1174 4618

    MAF Biosecurity New Zealand fax contacts:

    Policy and Risk: 04 894 0731

    Animal Welfare: 04 894 0728

    Border Standards: 04 894 0733

    Post Border: 04 894 0736

    Enforcement and Audit: 09 300 1021

    Investigation and Diagnostic Centres: 04 526 5601

    EDITORIALScience: the foundation of biosecurity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

    BIOSECURITY SCIENCEFluorescent fi sh spark GM response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4Daniel Simberloff : Early detection, early action key to

    incursion response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6Breeding varroa-tolerant honey bee stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9Didymo science seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

    Spring-fed creeks: something in the water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10River control trial shows promise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11Eff ects on invertebrates not as bad as feared? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

    Biological control of gumleaf skeletoniser an update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13Preventing establishment of exotic mosquitoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14Pacifi c invasive ant taxonomy workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16Animal welfare research priorities updated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

    FRONTLINE NEWSChina likely source of Asian gypsy moth larva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Kiwi snake catchers train with the real thing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20Public consultation on dogs code of welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20Food waste regulations an important line of defence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22Equine infl uenza update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23A biosecurity curriculum for New Zealand? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24NETS visitors impressed with plastic wrap technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25New database to link invertebrates with host plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25NAWAC and NAEAC annual reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

    BIOSECURITY INTERFACEInaugural International Pacifi c Invasive Ant Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

    BIOSECURITY SYSTEMSFour-way border governance group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28Germplasm and Live Animals Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

    UPDATESImport health standard development programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29Codes of ethical conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29Codes of welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30NAEAC annual report available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

    DIRECTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3031

    Cover: Illustration by Words & Pictures.

  • editorial

    Science: the foundation of biosecurity

    ISSUE 78 | MAF BIOSECURITY NEW ZEALAND | 3

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    The research, risk assessment, standard-setting and decision making that feed into our biosecurity and animal welfare systems are built on a foundation of rigorous science. Not surprisingly, MAF Biosecurity New Zealand (MAFBNZ) employs a great many scientists throughout the organisation: at our investigation and diagnostic centres, at the border and in head offi ce. And beyond our own organisation, we work closely with a wide community of scientists. In fact, you can read about the work of some of our science colleagues in the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and Fish and Game New Zealand in our feature on the recent didymo science seminar on pages 1012.

    In the context of biosecurity, the fi rst branch of science that springs to mind is biology which is essential in helping us to understand the pests and diseases were trying to keep out or manage; but biology is just one of a very wide range of scientifi c disciplines that make up our biosecurity system.

    In dealing with a potential new marine incursion lets take, for example, the highly invasive Caulerpa taxifolia discussed by Dr Daniel Simberloff on page 6 of this issue you might draw on the expertise of a very large science team indeed: incursion investigators and incursion response and surveillance teams; marine biologists, taxonomists and molecular biologists to identify the species and understand its ecology; epidemiologists and oceanographic modellers to work out how it might spread; risk analysts, economists, fi sheries scientists and Matauranga Maori experts to assess the environmental, economic, social and cultural impacts and help us to decide how to respond; and social scientists and market researchers to target and communicate our approach.

    All of these scientifi c disciplines need to cooperate to identify the best biosecurity solutions. Biosecurity science, like biosecurity itself, is complex, and a coordinated and collaborative approach is essential for innovative and eff ective outcomes. Those solutions may be complex for example, the development of new technologies for detecting biosecurity risks in containers or multispecies molecular tools for marine surveillance. Conversely, it may be a simple but eff ective practical measure for containing or eradicating a pest, such as the plastic wrapping technique demonstrated at the recent National Education and Training Seminar (NETS see page 25).

    MAFBNZs Strategic Science TeamIn recognition of the importance of science to biosecurity, when MAFBNZ was set up in 2004 (then as Biosecurity New Zealand), a new team was established to focus on a strategic approach to science. The fi ve-member team has a mix of sectoral (marine, plant and animal) and more general expertise. The Strategic Science Teams role is to provide oversight, focus and coordination for biosecurity and animal welfare science. Our work includes: coordination of MAFBNZ engagement in Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST) research programmes; administration of the MAFBNZ operational research programme; provision of scientifi c advice; and the development of science policy. Another major focus of the team has been working with the Ministry of Research, Science and Technology to develop a Biosecurity Science Strategy for New Zealand.

    A Biosecurity Science Strategy for New ZealandIn November last year, a draft Biosecurity Science Strategy, developed in consultation with science providers, funders and users, was released for public consultation. We received many valuable submissions and have been incorporating comments into the fi nal version which is planned for release later this year. The science strategy focuses on three key areas:

    direction for science making sure we identify and communicate our research needs

    delivery of science making sure our science delivery is as effi cient and eff ective as possible

    uptake of science making sure we are using science outputs to improve our biosecurity systems.

    As well as identifying current science needs and priorities, the science strategy outlines a fundamental change in the way that biosecurity science is prioritised and directed. It describes a biosecurity science system that will ensure that clear advice on priorities is provided to all those involved in biosecurity science. This system will be used to regularly review and identify research priorities as well as advising on the implementation of research outputs.

    This edition of Biosecurity includes good examples of the way science is supporting biosecurity. The great science capability that we have in New Zealand, thinking strateg

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