whitten inclusion pd with coteaching

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  1. 1. Whitten Middle School Eagle Ridge Conference Center Cecilia Lemon Rice, Presenter Victor Ellis, Principal August 14, 2014
  2. 2. Every Child!Every Child! Every Day!Every Day! InclusionInclusion is theis the Key toKey to Leave No Child BehindLeave No Child Behind
  3. 3. RITA PIERSON
  4. 4. Inclusion is the process of meshingInclusion is the process of meshing general and special education reformgeneral and special education reform initiatives and strategies in order toinitiatives and strategies in order to achieve aachieve a unifiedunified system of publicsystem of public education that incorporateseducation that incorporates allall childrenchildren and youth as active,and youth as active, fullyfully participatingparticipating members of the school community; thatmembers of the school community; that views diversity as theviews diversity as the normnorm; and that; and that ensures a high quality of education forensures a high quality of education for eacheach student by providing meaningfulstudent by providing meaningful curriculum, effective teaching, andcurriculum, effective teaching, and necessary supports fornecessary supports for eacheach student.student.
  5. 5. 1. Schools are a microcosm of society. Alter attitudes. ALL children respect and value diversity. ALL children learn they are valued. KNOW WHY INCLUSION IS IMPORTANT!!! 2. ALL children learn best when educated together. -- Mutual benefits.
  6. 6. Its the law.Its the law.
  7. 7. Brown vs. BOE Mainstreaming Integration Inclusion School Restructuring Where we were. . .Where we were. . . and are.and are.
  8. 8. Its the rightIts the right thing to do.thing to do.
  9. 9. Basic Human NeedsBasic Human Needs HUMAN DIGNITY SURVIVAL EMPOWERMENTBELONGING GENEROSITY HUM OR AND FUN FEELINGS OF COMPETENCE TOCOMMUNICATE
  10. 10. Attitudes & PerceptionsAttitudes & Perceptions About Classroom Climate: I feel accepted by teachers and peers I experience a sense of comfort and order
  11. 11. Abraham Maslow: Hierarchy of Needs PHYSIOLOGICAL Food, Water, Shelter, Warmth SAFETY Security, Stability, Freedom from Fear BELONGING-LOVE Friends, Family, Spouse, Lover SELF ESTEEM Achievement, Mastery, Recognition, Respect SELF-ACTUALIZATION Creativity, Inner Talent, Fulfillment
  12. 12. Abraham Maslow: Hierarchy of Needs PHYSIOLOGICAL Food, Water, Shelter, Warmth SAFETY Security, Stability, Freedom From Fear BELONGING-LOVE Friends, Family, Spouse, Lover SELF ESTEEM Achievement, Mastery, Recognition, Respect SELF-ACTUALIZATION Creativity, Inner Talent, Fulfillment
  13. 13. More accepting attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Voeltz, 1980, 1982; Kishi, 1988; Evans et al., 1992). Participation in integrated activities and settings linked to positive attitudes toward peers with disabilities. (CRI, 1992). Increased achievement through cooperative learning and peer tutoring activities (c.f., Johnson & Johnson, 1989; Kagan, 1992). Benefits to StudentsBenefits to Students WithoutWithout DisabilitiesDisabilities
  14. 14. Improvement in self-concept. Growth in social cognition. Increased tolerance of other people. Reduced fear of human differences. Development of personal principles. Interpersonal acceptance. Friendships Peck, Donaldson, & Pezzoli, 1990
  15. 15. Benefits to StudentsBenefits to Students withwith DisabilitiesDisabilities Increased levels of student interaction/ appropriateness and frequency of interaction with peers (Brinker, 1985; Brinker & Thorpe, 1986; Hanline, 1993). Acquisition of social and communication skills. (Cole & Meyer, 1991)
  16. 16. Benefits to StudentsBenefits to Students withwith DisabilitiesDisabilities (cont)(cont) Positive post-school adjustment and employment after graduation (Brown et al., 1987; Hasazi, Gordon, & Roe, 1985). Increased achievement of IEP objectives (Brinker & Thorpe, 1984).
  17. 17. Benefits to StudentsBenefits to Students withwith DisabilitiesDisabilities (cont)(cont) Research on negative impact of tracking and ability grouping. IEP Higher quality IEPs developed for students in general education placements and integrated place- ments (Hunt & Ferron-Davis, 1993; Hunt, Goetz, & Anderson, 1986).
  18. 18. Children with disabilities achieve just as well or better in general education than special education classes (ASCD, Jan. 95). Benefits to StudentsBenefits to Students withwith DisabilitiesDisabilities (cont)(cont)
  19. 19. Increased repertoire of teaching strategies applicable to all students. Increased level of professional confidence. Improved planning skills. Increased awareness of all students needs. Giangreco et al., 1993 Benefits to Teachers:Benefits to Teachers:
  20. 20. Benefits to Teachers (cont): Infusion of expertise: Two or more trained professionals. Two or more approaches or styles of teaching. Sharing ideas, responsibilities, materials, resources. More than one person deciding on supplemental, complementary, or adapted instruction.
  21. 21. Have a Satisfying Career LRE for LIFE Project 8/97 Outcomes of Education:Outcomes of Education: FORSALE Houses 'R' us Realty SOLD Live as aLive as a Valued andValued and RespectedRespected MemberMember Have MeaningfulHave Meaningful RelationshipsRelationships Be a Life-Long Learner The Same forALL Children!The Same forALL Children!
  22. 22. On-going collaboration between co-teachers on a regular/daily basis. Multiple teachers in a classroom to facilitate instruction. A team-teaching approach that allows flexibility in meeting the needs of all learners. A format that provides opportunities for individual intern instruction delivery and planning for small and large groups, and short and long-term lessons that may incorporate a variety of teaching strategies.
  23. 23. On-going collaboration between co-teachers on a regular/daily basis. Multiple teachers in a classroom to facilitate instruction. A team-teaching approach that allows flexibility in meeting the needs of all learners. A format that provides opportunities for individual intern instruction delivery and planning for small and large groups, and short and long-term lessons that may incorporate a variety of teaching strategies.
  24. 24. One teacher teaching and one teacher sitting. One teacher planning and the other teacher not. One teacher easily identified as primary instructional leader and the other as an assistant. One teacher that implements classroom management responsibilities and the other that only provides support.
  25. 25. Co-teaching is one way to deliver services to students with disabilities or other special needs as part of a philosophy of inclusive practices.
  26. 26. WHAT ARE THEY? one teach, one support parallel teaching alternative teaching station teaching team teaching WHAT DO THEY LOOK LIKE? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gY9GeuCwW
  27. 27. As a result, it shares many benefits with other inclusion strategies, including a reduction in stigma for students with special needs, an increased understanding and respect for students with special needs on the part of other students, and the development of a sense of heterogeneously-based classroom community.
  28. 28. In co-taught classrooms, ALL students can receive improved instruction. This includes students who are academically gifted or talented, students who have average ability, students who are at risk for school failure as well as students with identified special needs. Teaching is one way to deliver services to students with disabilities or other special needs as part of a philosophy of inclusive practices.
  29. 29. Although co-teaching is integral to the inclusive practices in many schools, it is not a requirement for inclusion to occur. Inclusion refers to a broad belief system or philosophy embracing the notion that all students should be welcomed members of a learning community, and that all students are part of their classrooms even if their abilities differ.
  30. 30. ONE TEACH, ONE SUPPORT ONE TEACH ONE SUPPORT
  31. 31. SHARED PLANNING PHYSICAL CONFIGURATION OF CLASSROOM SEAMLESS INSTRUCTION AND FLOW FROM ONE ACTIVITY TO THE NEXT SHARED CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION SHARED CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONALISM AND RESPECT

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