Using Gelatin for Moulds and Prosthetics

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  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

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    Using gelatin for moulds and prostheticsby marshon on May 22, 2010

    Table of Contents

    Using gelatin for moulds and prosthetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    Intro: Using gelatin for moulds and prosthetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    Step 1: The basic mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    Step 2: Making the basic 'goo' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    Step 3: Cool it all down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

    Step 4: Using the basic mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

    Step 5: Foaming gelatin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

    Step 6: To make the Peter Gaal nose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

    Step 7: Pour the plaster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

    Step 8: Casting the gelatin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

    Step 9: Colouring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

    Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

    Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

    Author:marshon MarshonUntidy, disorganised and a bit silly.I am a photographer, artist, body artist, sculptor, prosthetic maker, model engineer, and general idiot who likes making stuff and messing about.

    Intro: Using gelatin for moulds and prostheticsAfter my 'ible regarding using alginate as a mould making material, there were lots of questions about materials and obtaining them. Here's another method that usesonly items that are readily available.

    Gelatin is a much disregarded product when it comes to the home user.It is safe to use and has some fantastic properties, it can be cast, or used to make moulds, it is re-usable (you just melt it back down) and best of all it's cheap and easyto get hold of.It's safe (you can obviously eat it), but it's not just for cooking!There are plenty of on-line tutorials on gelatin preparation for SFX, but they all call for some exotic ingredients. This 'ible uses only off the shelf stuff, but it works perfectlywell.

    You can store the prepared gelatin in the freezer for months, so make up a few batches and store them for future use.

    In this Instructable we will prepare two types of gelatin mix, and look at their uses.

    Step 1: The basic mixWe will need the following materials:

    Gelatin, you want the crystal or powder type, not the sheets. This is available in the bakery section of your supermarket. Gelatin is an extract of beef so it's a naturalproduct. It is used to 'set' various foods. Most notably Jelly (Jello), but it is found in lots of recipes. I use 'Dr Oetker', only because it's sold in Tescos.Glycerine is a pure form of liquid syrup. Found at the drug store or pharmacy. Often used to sweeten kids medicines.

    Liquid honey, or 'runny' honey. The stuff in a squeezy bottle will do fine.

    Warm water, a plastic jug, some plastic cups, some stirring sticks (from the coffee shop), a small electric whisk. some washing up liquid, and access to a microwave oven

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

    Step 2: Making the basic 'goo'The amounts are not too critical, but I generally use a small plastic cup as a measure.

    1 part honey1 part water2 parts gelatin2 parts glycerine

    Fill one small cup with gelatin crystals and set to one side.

    Take another small plastic cup and half fill it with warm water, add runny honey to top it off and give it a gentle stir to dissolve the honey. Pour the whole cup of honey intoyour plastic jug.refill the plastic cup with glycerine and pour that into the jug as well.Warm the jug in the microwave, on full power for 20 seconds and give the mixture a really good stir. You want the mix warm to hot but NOT BOILING.Add the cup of gelatin to the jug and start stirring it, you want all the crystals to dissolve. Give the mix another 20 seconds in the microwave if the crystals won't dissolve.Keep stirring and heating as necessary to dissolve the gelatin and give a uniform colour and consistency. DON'T LET THE MIXTURE BOIL!

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

    Step 3: Cool it all downOnce the mix has become uniform and a sort of clear goldish brown colour, it's ready for cooling. Stick the jug in the fridge or the freezer and leave it for four hours.The basic mix is now ready. It will take fairly rough treatment at this stage, so force a finger between the mix and the side of the jug and pull out the 'puck' of rubberygelatin mix.

    The pucks can be placed in a food bag and stored in the freezer until required. I make up a batch of 3 or 4 pucks at a time and store them.

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

    Step 4: Using the basic mixThe basic mix has a number of properties. It is strong enough to take a fair bit of undercut, though not as strong as RTV rubber. It can be used to make moulds by simplywarming it in the microwave until it becomes liquid, pour it over the pattern, allow it to cool and then remove the pattern.It will cast almost any cold cure material such as resin or plaster, as long as the pattern can take the heat when pouring.

    The basic mix also has a few other properties of interest. It has almost exactly the same mass and elasticity as natural muscle. Therefore it can be used to cast excellentprosthetics, you can use a plaster single mould, such as the ones used in my other 'ibles, or in a two part mould to create face masks and suchlike. These are describedlater in this 'ible.

    Here is a link to the work of Peter Gaal (a true genius) using a latex bald cap and a gelatin 'nose' prosthetic to create an alien girl:The work of Peter Gaal

    Below is how to use it to make a simple mould. I have used the gelatin to cast a bolt to show the undercut it will take. The resin cast has retained the thread pattern.

    Remember that resin heats up as it cures. Too big a piece and the heat will start to melt the gelatin.

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

  • http://www.instructables.com/id/Using-gelatin-for-moulds-and-prosthetics/

    Step 5: Foaming gelatinNow that we have the basic mix we can foam it to use instead of foamed latex. It is used in exactly the same manner as foamed latex, but does not require any sort ofspecial baking or foaming agents.

    Place a puck of the prepared gelatin into your plastic jug and gently re-heat it in the microwave until it becomes liquid. DON'T LET IT BOIL!Give it a stir with a coffee stick to make sure it is nicely mixed. Then add two or three drops of washing up liquid to the jug.Get your small electric whisk and starting on the lowest speed begin whisking the mixture. Once it has started to take air you can increase the speed. You want massesof tiny uniform bubbles. I whisked mine for around ten minutes until it had taken on about 3 times it's original size.

    Put the jug in the freezer for four hours. Then pull out the large plug of foamed gelatin. It is very much softer and more pliable than the standard mix and will make reallylightweight masks and prosthetics.

    Step 6: To make the Peter Gaal noseTo make a two part mould prosthetic like the one in the Peter Gaal video, we need to make some moulds. If you want a mask to fit a specific person then you will need tocast their