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-DNA 3964F-1-2

THE ROSCOE MANUAL

Volume 1-2: A Simplified ROSCOE Input Scheme

James BaltesJoel Garbarino E LGeneral Research Corporation

P.O. Box 6770

Santa Barbara, California 93111

29 February 1980

Final Report for Period 9 November 1977-29 February 1980

CONTRACT No. DNA 001-78-C-0002 DTICAPPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; L

DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. JUL3

THIS WORK SPONSORED BY THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY

UNDER RDT&E RMSS CODES B322074464 S99QAXHC06428 H2590D

AND B322075464 S99QAXHCO6432 H2590D.

Prepared for

DirectorADEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY

0 Washington, D. C. 203059 0

Destroy this report when it is no longerneeded. Do not return to sender.

PLEASE NOTIFY THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY,ATTN: STII, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20305, IFYOUR ADDRESS IS INCORRECT, IF YOU WISH TOBE DELETED FROM THE DISTRIBUTION LIST, ORIF THE ADDRESSEE IS NO LONGER EMPLOYED BYYOUR ORGANIZATION.

UNCLASSIFIEDSECURITY CLASSIVICATION Or T.15 PAGE rI4Ph.n 11its, nr I

REP DOCUMENTATION PAGE BFRE OMPLERUTINORM*.

UNCLASSIFIED

SECUMITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGI(When Date Ent..wd)

\20. (Continued)

The ROSCOE documentation consists of a number of volumes, including usermanuals (Volumes 1 through 3), systems code descriptions (Volumes 4, 20,

and 21-1), code validation documents (Volumes 6 and 23), and phenomenologycode descriptions (all others). This document has been written as an

extension to the user manuals. It describes a simplified input scheme for

running a subset of ROSCOE problems. It is intended for the user who only

occasionally runs the code or would like to run a small problem.

a6

UNCLASSIFIED

5UCUIUTY CLaSSorICATION 03F THIS PAGIEI'WIA O.1t P,.,rVd

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section

LIST OF TABLES 2

I INTRODUCTION 3

4

2 DESCRIPTION

2.1 Limitations 4

2.2 Input Variables 5

2.3 Example Input Sets 68

2.4 Outputs

3 ACCESSING THE INPUT SCHEME 16

3.1 Batch Jobs 16

3.2 Interactive Jobs 16

.17

APPENDIX A: USER REFERENCE TABLES

Accession For

, D T , T.

Av; 1 li Cores

D, t

' [. . 1

LIST OF TABLES

Table Page

1 ROSCOE Tabular Outputs 10

A.1 A Directory of Input Variables 18

A.2 Allowable Unit Names 29

A.3 Position Coordinate Specifications 31

A.4 Sample Control Card Deck for AFWL/NOS/BEl 33

A.5 Sample Procedure Permfile for Interactive Use 34

A.6 Time-Share Inputs 35

2

I INTRODUCTION

In the last few years, ROSCOE (Radar and Optical Systems Code with

Nuclear Effects) has been expanded to include simulations of satellite

communications and optical surveillance systems in a nuclear environment.

This expansion has led to considerably more complexity in the input re-

quirements.

WThile the ROSCOE input scheme was devised to handle these problems

(with no additional coding) and to allow the user complete flexibility

in structuring scenarios with multiple sensors, objects, and bursts, it

takes some time to learn bow to use the system. For the user who only

occasionally runs the code, or would like to run a small problem, a new

input scheme has been built for running a subset of ROSCOE problems with

a simple set of inputs.

The next section describes this new input scheme. Example input

set,; are shown for several different types of problems and the program

outputs are briefly discusseid. Section 3 describes how to access the

new scheme, for both batch and interactive jobs. Finally, to make this

paper useful as a reference guide, tables which describe the input options

have been placed in Appendix A.

p

3

2 DESCRIPTION

The new ROSCOE input scheme consists of a data deck with a pre-

selected set of input options, and a data preprocessor program which

inserts user-specified values for the options into the data deck. The

scheme, in general, does not sacrifice any of ROSCOE's input versatility,

since a new data deck with a different set of options can be generated

without writing new code.

2.1 LIMITATIONS

With the new scheme, as currently set up, the user can run nuclear

burst phenomenology problems alone, or nuclear effects on radar sur-

veillance and tracking of ballistic missiles, satellite communication,

or optical surveillance and tracking, subject to these constraints:

0 Up to five bursts are allowed, at altitudes up to 400 km -

positions, times, and burst properties are input.

0 Only one radar can be simulated in a run -- radar character-

istics and location are input.

0 Only one object trajectory can be simulated in a run

(although multiple objects can be spaced in tine on the tra-

jectory)--launch and impact points, impact time, and

reentry angle are input.

to Only one satellite communication system can be simulated in

a run (consisting of one ground transmitter, one ground

receiver, and one set of satellite-borne equipment which

receives and transmits) -- transmitter and receiver charac-

teristics and locations are input.

* Only one optical sensor can be simulated in a run -- sensor

characteristics and location are input.

0 Run times can be no more than 900 seconds after the last

burst.

4

2.2 INPUT VARIABLES

Input variables in the new scheme are of five types:

" General Inputs. Variables related to a reference location

or time.

" Physics inputs. Variables required to simulate a burst and

print physics outputs.

" Radar Inputs. Variables required to simulate radar surveil-

lance or tracking performance.

* Satcom Inputs. Variables required to simulate a satellite

communication problem.

" Optics Inputs. Variables required to simulate optical sensor

surveillance or tracking performance.

Table A.1 is a directory of input variables, divided into the five types

described above with notes to indicate the options available. For each

variable, the table gives its name, the number of values to be supplied

(more than one if the variable is a vector), a definition of the variable

including default units of measure, the default values that will be

assumed if you do not input the variable, and whether a unit name is

allowed for the variable. (Table A.2 shows the allowable unit names.)

It is important to note the default units given. If you input values

without unit names (for those variables allowing unit names), the de-

fault units are assumed. Note that the default values listed in Table

A.2 are given in their customary units, which are not always the same

as the internal default units.

To run a case, follow the instructions given in Table A.1, and input

those variables you wish to change in the form: variable = value unit,

variable = value unit, etc. raid the input string with the command RUN

following the last variable input. For vectors, the format may be:

vector = value unit, value unit, etc., or vector(index) = value unit,

value unit, etc. In the first case, the values are assigned to vector(l),

1h

5

vector(2), etc,; in the second case, values are assigned to vector(index),

vector(index + 1), etc. This free format is essentially compatible with

the Fortran NAMELIST input scheme.

Note that positions can be specified by geographical coordinates

(GEOGR), or by Cartesian (LOCXYZ) or range-azimuth-elevation (RADAR)

coordinates relative to a reference location. The order of entry,

orientation, and units for these specifications are given in Table A.3

and Fig. A.l.

2.3 EXANfPLE INPUT SETS

2.3.1 Physics Problem

To run a simple physics problem consisting of a single burst with

the default characteristics and these assumptions:

0 Burst time = 0 s

0 Yield = 10 kT

0 Altitude = 40 km

* Output every 20 s until 120 s after burst

input:

TSTOP = 120, OTIME = 0, OTINT = 20, BTIMEI = 0,

BPOSI(3) = 40, YIELEl 1 10 KT, RUN

2.3.2 Radar Problem

To run a radar surveillance problem, where:

0 There is a single burst with the above properties.

* The radar is at the center of a local Cartesian coordinate

system (directly under the burst).

0 The radar is of the type described by the default parameters.

0 The object being viewed has a -30 reentry angle and is aimed

at the radar.

.4

4-i6

* The object is at 100 km altitude at time = 0 when the

burst occurs.

* Radar measurements are made once every second for 20 s.

input:

TSTOP = 20, BTIMEl = 0, BPOSI(3) = 40, YIELD1 = 10 KT,

OBTAG = 0BJECT-1, OBTIM = 0, OBPOS(2) = 173,

100 KM, 0BVEL(3) = -30, RADAR = REFER, RUN

2.3.3 Satcom Problem

'u. To run a satellite communication problem, where:

0 The ground transmitter and receiver are together, directly

beneath a satellite at synchronous altitude (the default

condition)

a The default link inputs are assumed

0 The default nuclear burst (I MT at 200 km altitude) occurs

10 s after the first communication

* The burst is displaced 200 km horizontally from the

line of sight

0 Communication calculations are made every 20 s, from

0 s to 100 s

input

TSTOP = 100, BTIMEl = 10, BPOSI(2) = 200, CTIME = 0,

CTINT = 20, RUN

2.3.4 Optics Problem

To run an optical sensor surveillance problem, where:

0 There is a single burst of 10 kt at 40 km altitude

, The sensor is at synchronous altitude

* The sensor is pointed at the burst

1. 7- .

2.4.2 Tabular Outputs

There are seven phenomenology lists, five radar lists, two

satellite-communication lists, and three optics lists that may be output

at the conclusion of the run, depending on the type of simulation per-

formed.

The phenomenology lists include: burst parameters, common fire-

ball parameters (fireball set 1), two additional low-altitude fireball

parameter lists (fireball set 2 and fireball set 3), additional high-

altitude fireball parameters (fireball set 4), contained debris region

parameters, and beta tube parameters.

The radar lists include: trajectory output, track measurement

errors, track filter output, and two lists of propagation errors.

The satcom lists include: propagation and probability-of-error

data, and satellite position coordinates with respect to the ground-

terminal positions.

The optics output lists include: angle and signal-strength measure-

, 1ments for an optical tracking sensor application, the radiance along each

path treated within the field-of-view, and the data stream output pro-

duced by a scanning sensor.

Table I shows a sma I I sample of each type of output. Some of

the column headings are self-explanatory, while others require additional.0 comment.

tj

I.

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3 ACCESSING THE INPUT SCHEME

3.1 BATCH JOBS

To access and use the new input scheme in the batch mode (i.e.,

by submitting a card input deck over the counter or through a remote

terminal), use a deck setup such as that shown in Table A.4.

Note that an optional card may precede the data cards, directing

the input program to print each default card changed, followed by the

new card which replaces it.

3.2 INTERACTIVE JOBS

To access and use the new input scheme using the time-share

system follow these steps (also shown in Table A.6). (First, you must

have a procedure permfile containing a small CYBER control language

"PR0C" and a set of control cards. A sample procedure permfile is shown

in Table A.5)

Step 1. Access your procedure file with tile...