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  • State of Alabama Department of Education

    Teacher Induction and Mentoring Manual

    Bulletin 2003

    No. 71

    It is the official policy of the Alabama Department of Education that no person in Alabama shall, on the grounds of race, color, disability, sex, religion, national origin, or age, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program, activity, or employment. An online version of this manual is available at www.alsde.edu.

    http://www.alsde.edu/

  • Teacher Induction and Mentoring Program

    Alabama State Department of Education

    This manual is the work of the following people:

    Vikki Miller, Ed.D. and

    Judy Bohannon

    Research and Program Development Civitan International Research Center The University of Alabama at Birmingham Janice N. Cotton, Ph.D. M. Amanda Deason Delyne D. Hicks ii

  • Task Force on Teacher Quality

    Chair: Dr. Ruth Ash, Dean of Education, Samford University

    Ms. Carol Brown, Alabama Coalition for Tomorrow Carol Brown and Associates

    Dr. Jayne A. Meyer, Director Teacher Education and Certification

    State Department of Education

    Dr. Cynthia C. Elsberry, Superintendent Talladega County Schools

    Dr. Catherine Moore, Coordinator Federal Programs Section

    State Department of Education

    Dr. Elizabeth French, Director Office of Interagency Programs Alabama Commission on Higher Education

    Dr. Joseph B. Morton Deputy State Superintendent State Department of Education

    Ms. Cathy Gassenheimer, Managing Director A+ Education Foundation

    Mr. Gene Murphree, Fiscal Analyst Legislative Fiscal Office

    Ms. Wilma Guthrie Teacher

    Ms. Caroline Novak, President A+ Education Foundation

    Dr. Ethel H. Hall, Vice President State Board of Education

    Ms. Sandra Ray, Member, 7th District State Board of Education

    Dr. Paul R. Hubbert, Executive Secretary Alabama Education Association

    Dr. Phil Redrick, Dean of Education Alabama A&M University

    Mr. Feagin Johnson Assistant State Superintendent State Department of Education

    Senator Hank Sanders Alabama Senate

    Representative John Knight Alabama House of Representatives

    Dr. Wayman Shiver, Jr, Interim Superintendent Birmingham City Schools

    Ms. Robin Litaker, Teacher Trace Crossings Elementary School

    Mr. William Smith, Chairman Royal Cup Inc.

    Ms. Kathy McVay President

    Alabama Education Association

    Dr. Barbara Walters, Coordinator

    State Department of Education State Department of Education

    iii

  • Introduction Among the goals set by the Task Force on Teacher Quality was the recruitment of caring, qualified teachers; improvement in retention rates; and reduction in the turnover rate of Alabama’s public school teachers. To accomplish these goals, the Task Force focused on the development of an induction/mentoring program as a means of keeping talented teachers in the profession and improving the quality of teaching. With funding under a Title II Teacher Quality Enhancement grant, the Alabama Department of Education launched the development of a comprehensive induction program that included a two-year mentoring component. In collaboration with Dr. Janice Cotton of the Civitan International Research Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the assistance of ten districts that agreed to participate in the two-year pilot, a framework for creating, supporting, and sustaining an induction program for beginning teachers was developed. Information in the Alabama Teacher Induction and Mentoring Manual represents best practices from individual states, districts, professional organizations, institutions of higher education, and research. It also incorporates what was learned in the Alabama pilot. District personnel are encouraged to use the manual in the manner that will best support the creation and coordination of an induction program that is most appropriate for their schools. Some districts may select only a portion to implement, and some may modify the material and merge it into their current program. It is with a great deal of appreciation that we acknowledge the time, energy, and insightful feedback of the teachers and administrators who took part in the pilot phase. Participating districts included Alexander City, Bessemer City, Birmingham City, Brewton City, Dallas County, Dothan City, Fort Payne City, Montgomery County, Phenix City, and Talladega County. We are also indebted to many of our colleagues across the state, especially Mara Jambor, Jefferson County Schools, and Patricia Nix, Retired School Administrator and Teacher, for their critical review of this document.

    iv

  • Code of Ethics

    Purpose of the Code of Ethics

    The primary goal of the Alabama Teacher Induction Program (ATIP) is to assist beginning teachers in making a successful transition into the school environment. Mentoring is the cornerstone of the program and therefore the conduct of the mentor and the integrity of the mentor/protégé relationship are of the utmost importance in the success of the ATIP. The purpose of the Mentor Code of Ethics is to clarify responsibilities and standards of accountability. While acknowledging every mentor/protégé relationship will be different, the Code should clarify the boundaries of appropriate behaviors and clarify the proper role and function of the mentor.

    Respect

     The mentor will respect the protégé’s integrity and individuality.

     The mentor will provide services in a nondiscriminatory manner.

     The mentor will show sensitive regard for the protégé’s moral, social, and religious standards and avoid imposing his/her beliefs.

     In the relationship, the protégé retains full freedom of choice and decision in his/her own classroom.

     The mentor’s main concern is the protégé’s integrity and welfare.

    Confidentiality

     The mentor will respect the rules of confidentiality with respect to the mentor/protégé relationship.

     The mentor shall disclose confidential information about the protégé only when compelling professional purpose is served or when required by law to prevent a clear and immediate danger to someone. Compelling professional purpose can be defined as anything that severely threatens a child’s emotional well being and/or academic performance.

     The mentor should respect the protégé’s privacy and confidentiality in disclosing information about the protégé to colleagues and superiors.

     The mentor should take precautions to ensure that records, reports, and correspondence relating to the protégé are secure from public inspection and not shared inappropriately.

    v

  • Power/Gain

     The mentor shall not use the relationship with his/her protégé to private advantage.

    Competence

     The mentor shall participate in continuing education to keep informed of current best practice in mentoring and teaching.

    Relationship

     The mentor will establish and maintain appropriate professional relationship boundaries.

     The mentor will avoid a dual relationship (e.g., business or intimate) with the protégé that could impair professional judgment, compromise the integrity of the induction program, and/or use the relationship for personal gain.

     The mentor should always be mindful of the importance of serving as a role model and act as an advocate for teaching.

    Termination of Relationship

     The mentor should not abandon or neglect the protégé. If the mentor is unable or unwilling to serve as mentor, every reasonable effort should be made to select another mentor and facilitate a smooth transition to the new mentor.

    Representative of the School and District

     The mentor is a representative of the school and district and should always attempt to fulfill the mission of the school and reflect the values and standards for which it stands. The mentor should be committed to excellence in teaching.

    Conflict of Interest

     The mentor should avoid having an evaluative relationship with the protégé. Serving in an evaluative capacity could compromise the primary relationship.

  • vi

    vi

  • Table of Contents Chapter I Induction Basics Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 1 What is teacher induction? ................................................................................................. 2 Why do school districts need an induction program? ................................................ 4 How does a district plan an induction program? ......................................................... 6 What are the building administrator’s responsibilities to the new teacher? ............................................................................................................ 12 What are the school faculty’s responsibilities to the new teacher? .........................

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