portland cement concrete pavement thickness variation ... nondestructive tests, thickness, pavement

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  • Lev Khazanovich, Principal Investigator Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo- Engineering

    University of Minnesota

    September 2016

    Research Project Final Report 2016-30

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Thickness Variation

    Versus Observed Pavement Distress

  • To request this document in an alternative format, such as braille or large print, call 651-366- 4718 or 1-800-657-3774 (Greater Minnesota) or email your request to ADArequest.dot@state.mn.us. Please request at least one week in advance.

    tel:651-366-4718 tel:651-366-4718 tel:1-800-657-3774 mailto:ADArequest.dot@state.mn.us

  • Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 2. 3. Recipients Accession No. MN/RC 2016-30 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Thickness Variation Versus Observed Pavement Distress

    September 2016 6.

    8. Performing Organization Report No.7. Author(s) Lev Khazanovich, Kyle Hoegh, Randal Barnes, Ryan Conway, Lucio Salles

    10. Project/Task/Work Unit No.9. Performing Organization Name and Address

    Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo- Engineering University of Minnesota 500 Pillsbury Drive SE Minneapolis, MN 55455

    CTS #2015024 11. Contract (C) or Grant (G) No.

    (c) 99008 (wo) 156

    12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Minnesota Department of Transportation Research Services and Library 395 John Ireland Blvd., MS 330 St. Paul, MN 55155

    Final Report 14. Sponsoring Agency Code

    15. Supplementary Notes http://www.mndot.gov/research/reports/2016/201630.pdf 16. Abstract (Limit: 250 words)

    Benefits from a potential significant correlation between distresses and slab thickness can be broadly applied in all stages of highway development from design and construction to maintenance decisions. In order to comprehensive explore this possibility, thickness data and existing distresses were related for three highway projects in Minnesota. Thickness was obtained through non-destructive ultrasonic testing, while distresses were recorded for the same location with a distress image software. Significant thickness variation was observed in both longitudinal and transverse directions. The combined results of thickness, shear wave velocity and distresses analysis revealed that an increase in shear wave velocity was coincident with a less damaged pavement area within a section. An in-depth statistical analysis confirmed this observation showing that shear surface velocity variation was better correlated with overall pavement performance than thickness variation. Differences in cracking behavior within a section were traced back to changes in construction and design practices, showing the potential of using shear velocity analysis for pavement maintenance. A survey and analysis procedure for shear wave velocity testing of concrete pavements is proposed.

    17. Document Analysis/Descriptors 18. Availability Statement nondestructive tests, thickness, pavement distress, rigid pavements, concrete pavements, ultrasonic tests, tomography

    No restrictions. Document available from: National Technical Information Services, Alexandria, Virginia 22312

    19. Security Class (this report) 20. Security Class (this page) 21. No. of Pages 22. Price Unclassified Unclassified 50

  • Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Thickness Variation

    Versus Observed Pavement Distress

    Final Report

    Prepared by

    Lev Khazanovich Randal Barnes Ryan Conway Lucio Salles

    Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo- Engineering University of Minnesota

    Kyle Hoegh Office of Materials and Road Research

    Minnesota Department of Transportation

    September 2016

    Published by

    Minnesota Department of Transportation Research Services & Library

    395 John Ireland Boulevard, MS 330 St. Paul, Minnesota 55155-1899

    This report represents the results of research conducted by the authors and does not necessarily represent the views or policies of the Minnesota Department of Transportation or the University of Minnesota. This report does not contain a standard or specified technique.

    The authors, the Minnesota Department of Transportation, and the University of Minnesota do not endorse products or manufacturers. Any trade or manufacturers’ names that may appear herein do so solely because they are considered essential to this report.

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................ 1 CHAPTER 2: DATA COLLECTION AND PROCESSING.................................................... 3

    2.1 Highway Projects Selected .................................................................................................... 3

    2.2 Distress survey ...................................................................................................................... 4

    2.3 Thickness survey ................................................................................................................... 6

    2.4 Data Processing ..................................................................................................................... 6

    CHAPTER 3: STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY ................................................................... 8 3.1 Predictors ............................................................................................................................... 8

    3.2 Logistic Model .................................................................................................................... 11

    3.3 Fitting the Logistic Model ................................................................................................... 12

    3.4 Significance of Fit Parameters ............................................................................................ 12

    CHAPTER 4: PRELIMINARY RESULTS ............................................................................. 14 4.1 Observed surface distresses ................................................................................................. 15

    4.2 Concrete condition .............................................................................................................. 16

    CHAPTER 5: COMBINED RESULTS .................................................................................... 18 5.1 Highway 60 (Highway 60) .................................................................................................. 18

    5.2 Highway 100 (Highway 100) .............................................................................................. 22

    5.3 Interstate 394 (I-394) ........................................................................................................... 23

    CHAPTER 6: REGRESSION RESULTS ................................................................................ 25 6.1 Thickness statistical analysis ............................................................................................... 25

    6.2 Shear wave velocity statistical analysis .............................................................................. 28

    CHAPTER 7: CONCLUSION................................................................................................... 34

    CHAPTER 8: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHEAR WAVE VELOCITY TESTING .... 35 8.1 Surface Shear Wave Velocity Proposed Survey Methodology ........................................... 36

    REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 40

  • LIST OF FIGURES

    Figure 1 - Videolog Software showing one section of Highway100 ............................................ 5 Figure 2 - MIRA measurement protocol ......................................................................................... 6 Figure 3 - Traverses and distress location ....................................................................................... 7 Figure 4 – Average thickness per location .................................................................................... 15 Figure 5 - Broken panels in Highway 60 East .............................................................................. 16 Figure 6 - (a) Transverse joint spalling in I-394 and (b) longitudinal joint spalling in Highway 60 East ................................................................................................................................................ 16 Figure 7 - Highway 60 East survey of (a) thickness, (b) SWV and (c) distresses. ....................... 18 Figure 8 - Combination of Highway 60 East results..................................................................... 19 Figure 9 - Highway 60 West survey of (a) thickness, (b) SWV and (c) distresses. ..................... 20 Figure 10 - Combination of Highway 60 West results ................................................................. 21 Figure 11 - Highway 100 survey of (a) thickness, (b) SWV and (c) distresses. ........................... 22 Figure 12 - Combination of Highway 100 results ........................................................................ 23 Figure 13 - I-394 survey of (a) thickness, (b) SWV and (c) distresses. ........................................ 24 Figure 14 - Combination of I-394 results ..................................................................................... 24 Figure 15 - Highway 60 East (Thickness): Average Traverse Slope versus Cracked and Broke

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