mozaz, sergi sabater, dami£ barcel£³. sara...

Download Mozaz, Sergi Sabater, Dami£ Barcel£³. Sara Rodr£­guez¢â‚¬¯Mozaz, Sergi Sabater, Dami£ Barcel£³. INTRODUCTION

Post on 16-Oct-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Diana Álvarez‐Muñoz, Albert Serra‐Compte, Natàlia Corcoll, Belinda Huerta,  Sara Rodríguez‐Mozaz, Sergi Sabater, Damià Barceló.

  • INTRODUCTION

    MATERIAL AND METHODS

    • Experimental

    • Analytical determination

    • Signal processing and multivariate analysis

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    • Metabolites identification

    • Biofilm response to environmental stressors

    CONCLUSIONS

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  • INTRODUCTION Drought

    Pharmaceuticals mixtures

    Landfill Animal waste           Aquaculture             Hospital  waste             Industrial            domestic waste 

    Pollution

    Chronic  exposure

  • INTRODUCTION

    Primary producers Biogeochemical cycle of organic 

    and inorganic matter Sensitive to river changes Have a rapid interaction with 

    dissolved substances Short life cycle Bioaccumulation capacity

    Biofilm

    BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE DISRUPTED METABOLIC PATHWAYS

  • GOALS

    1.To  identify  biofilm  biomarkers  of  drought  stress  and  pharmaceutical exposure. 

    2.To  elucidate   metabolic  pathways  affected  due  to  a  dry  period  and/or pharmaceutical exposure. 

    3.To  evaluate  if  the  effects  of  a  dry  period  on  the metabolome  of  biofilm  was  influenced  for  the  co‐occurrence  of  pharmaceutical  exposure.

  • Experimental

    MATERIAL  AND METHODS

    Fluvial mesocosm 2. Pharmaceutical exposure  (P)

    Compound Therapeutic family Nominal  Concentration  (ng/L)

    Ibuprofen Anti‐inflammatory 404 Diclofenac Anti‐inflammatory 366 Carbamazepine Psychiatric drug 124 Sulfamethoxazole Antibiotic 699 Erithromycin Antibiotic 169 Metoprolol β‐Blocker 1845 Atenolol β‐Blocker 117 Gemfibrozil Lipid regulator 140 Hydrochlorothiazide Diuretic 1135

    3. Dry exposure (7 days) (D) 

    4. Dry and pharmaceutical exposure (D+P)

    1. Control (C)

    Treatments:

    21 d colonization

    7 d drought

    14 d flow rewetting

    Total duration of the  experiment 42 d

  • Analytical determination

    MATERIAL  AND METHODS

    Samples were collected at the end of the experiment

    lyophilized and grounded

    Pressurized liquid extraction (ASE 350):

    • ACN:citric buffer (1:1)

    • Tª 60º C, 1500 psi, 3 static cycles of 5 min each

    Samples were dry down  and  re‐dissolve  in  100 ml  of water  prior solid phase extraction (SPE) on OASIS HLB cartridges

    The  eluates were  evaporated  and  reconstituted  in  1 mL  of  methanol, 10 µl ISTDs mix were also added.

    HPLC‐HRMS (LC‐LTQ‐Orbitrap Velos)

    Equipped with electrospray  ionization operating both  in positive and negative mode.

  • Signal processing and multivariate analysis

    Mass spectra: 100‐700 m/z, deconvoluted and aligned using Sieve software.  The markers were exported to R software for multivariate analysis.

    MATERIAL  AND METHODS

    Identification of the markers: Accurate  mass Elemental composition. Biochemical data bases Match up MS/MS response. Confirmation by STDs.

    Fig 1.Principal component analysis (PCA)  of significant metabolites of biofilm exposed to the treatments

    Clear separation between the biofilm  exposed and not exposed to drought (D)

    Slight separation between control (C)  group and biofilm exposed only to  pharmaceuticals (P)

    Not clear separation between D and  drought + pharmaceuticals (D+P)

  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Metabolites identification

    Table 1.Tentative identification of markers in biofilm after treatments by using LC‐LTQ‐Orbitrap (ESI+ and ESI‐).

    METABOLIC PATHWAYS

    M/z value of marker ion

    RT (min)

    ESI Putative experimental

    molecular formula of ion Theoretical

    mass Error (ppm)

    Putative Identity

    251.2003 5.29 + C16H27O2 [M+H]+ 251.2011 3.2 LPA (16:3)

    279.2319 5.58 + C18H31O2 [M+H]+ 279.2324 1.8 alfa linolenic acid

    297.2424 5.85 + C18H33O3 [M+H]+ 297.2429 1.7 A vernolate

    191.0193 0.71 ‐ C6H7O7 [M‐H]‐ 191.0192 ‐0.5 Citrate

    187.0975 3.73 ‐ C9H15O4 [M‐H]‐ 187.0970 ‐2.7 Azelaic acid

    269.2119 5.15 ‐ C16H29O3 [M‐H]‐ 269.2117 ‐0.7 16‐Oxohexadecanoic acid

    275.2012 5.76 ‐ C18H27O2 [M‐H]‐ 275.2011 ‐0.3 Stearidonic acid

    255.2323 6.12 ‐ C16H31O2 [M‐H]‐ 255.2324 0.4 Palmitic acid

    339.3264 6.75 ‐ C22H43O2 [M‐H]‐ 339.3263 ‐0.3 Behenic acid

    367.3575 6.94 ‐ C24H47O2 [M‐H]‐ 367.3576 0.3 Lignoceric acid

    409.2353 9.62 ‐ C19H38O7P [M‐H]‐ 409.2355 0.4 LPA(0:0/16:0)

    253.2170 5.93 ‐ C16H29O2 [M‐H]‐ 253.2168 ‐0.8 Palmitoleic acid

  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Metabolites identification

    Fragmentation pattern of  Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA 

    (0:0/16:0). 

    Fig.2. A) Total ion chromatogram  from biofilm sample exposed to  pharmaceuticals, B) Mass spectrum of this compound at 30 v CID.

  • Biofilm response to environmental stressors

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    Table 2. Significant variation of markers levels (p

  • Biofilm response to environmental stressors: Drought

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    Table 3. metabolite type and response to  a dry period

    Lipids were the most affected metabolites.  Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids increased after a dry period: changes in membrane 

    fluidity, increase of energy reservoirs and a growth phase of microorganisms after drought.  The increase in carboxilic acids: signaling functions. Oxohexadecanoic acid it is involved in unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis.

  • Biofilm response to environmental stressors: pharmaceuticals

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    Table 3. metabolite type and response to  a pharmaceutical exposure

    Lipids were the most affected metabolites.  Saturated fatty acids decreased after pharmaceutical exposure: higher demand and consume 

    of energy.  The increase of unsaturated fatty acids: conversion of saturated into unsaturated by the 

    organism. Glycerophospholipid: baseline toxicity of pharmaceutical and alteration of the membrane 

    structure.

  • CONCLUSSIONS 

    LPA (0:0/16:0) and palmitic acid have been proposed as specific biomarkers of  pharmaceutical exposure in biofilm. In the case of drought: palmitoleic, LPA  (16:3), alpha‐linoleic, stearidonic, 16‐Oxohexadecanoic, azelaic acids and citrate  have been pointed out. Behenic and lignoceric acids have been also proposed  but as common biomarkers with different observed effect.

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids is the main endogenous metabolic pathway  disrupted by both stressors but other biological functions can also be altered:  membrane fluidity, signaling, energy reservoirs.    

    When biofilm was simultaneously exposed to drought and pharmaceuticals the  stressor that produced a higher alteration on the biofilm metabolome was the  drought, although a slight alteration due to the co‐ocurrence of pharmaceuticals  can not be discarded.

  • Acknowledgements 

    Thanks to all the co‐authors specially to Albert Serra and Natalia Corcoll.

    This project was supported by the Scarce Consolider‐Ingenio 2010  (CSD2009‐00065) “Assessing and Predicting Effects On Water Quantity and  Quality In Iberian Rivers Caused By Global Change (2009‐2014)” and the  Spanish ministry of economy and competitiveness.

    To all of you for your attention.

    Thank  you !

Recommended

View more >