melissa johnson, meaghan fitzpatrick, da’nisha avery, matt leibham

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  • Slide 1
  • Melissa Johnson, Meaghan Fitzpatrick, DaNisha Avery, Matt Leibham
  • Slide 2
  • The Classroom Environment
  • Slide 3
  • Classroom environments vary, but they always need to be welcoming places; interesting, joyful places that beckon kids and teachers to actively participate in the pursuit of knowledge. Places that invite curiosity, exploration, collaboration, and conversation. Places that make us want to come in and stay, day after day after day. -Debbie Miller
  • Slide 4
  • Your classroom should: Reflect your teaching philosophy Promote learning Be inviting to students
  • Slide 5
  • Seating Arrangements Should be based on the lesson/teaching style Depends on furniture and space available High traffic areas Action zone Many, many ways to arrange seats
  • Slide 6
  • Rows
  • Slide 7
  • Clusters/Pods
  • Slide 8
  • Horseshoe/Semicircle
  • Slide 9
  • Pairs
  • Slide 10
  • As a child, what seating arrangement helped you learn most effectively? 1.Rows 2.Clusters/Pods 3.Horseshoe/Semicircle 4.Pairs 5.Other
  • Slide 11
  • As a future teacher which seating style are you more inclined to use in your classroom? 1.Rows 2.Clusters/Pods 3.Horseshoe/Semicircle 4.Pairs 5.Other
  • Slide 12
  • Areas in the Classroom Large group meeting area Small group meeting area(s) Books Teachers desk Storage areas www.classroom.4teachers.org
  • Slide 13
  • Classroom Walls Chalkboard, whiteboard, SMART board Anchor charts Bulletin boards Student work Decorations
  • Slide 14
  • Having routine in the classroom
  • Slide 15
  • Scheduling, Structure, Involvement Take a closer look 1 Scheduling traditional vs. nontraditional 2 Structured downtime, over plan 3 Involving parents and staff
  • Slide 16
  • Block Scheduling 1 Maximize learning time Allow for more instructional flexibility Accommodate common planning time for teachers More time for student inquiry, project work, and interactive thematic instruction 70-140 or more minutes rather than the traditional 50 minute instructional long periods
  • Slide 17
  • Example of a Block Schedule
  • Slide 18
  • 2 Structured downtime -Visuals- Daily schedules written on the board with student expectations Posters hung up around the room with class rules Labels around the classroom showing where materials go.
  • Slide 19
  • Examples of visuals
  • Slide 20
  • Can you pick out all the wrong things in this video? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =vbF4qz_-PCM Class discussion on substitute teachers
  • Slide 21
  • 3 Involving Parents and Staff Use daily method to keep parents informed Have a daily routine for staff working in your classroom with students who have special education needs Substitute teachers need to be on board with your daily routine
  • Slide 22
  • Four Corners Activity! Collaboration
  • Slide 23
  • Break (5 minutes)
  • Slide 24
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Slide 25
  • Classroom Management Guidelines Concentrate on the desirable student behaviors Respond to inappropriate behavior, especially disruptive behavior Be aware of what is happening in your classroom Create Smooth Transitions Provide Opportunities for Autonomy
  • Slide 26
  • John Weisbrod Interview PJ Jacobs Jr High English Teacher
  • Slide 27
  • I think classroom management roots itself in who we are as people and how we think about those around us. There really is no "classroom management" that supersedes connecting on a personal level with the students--and they recognize that. Any student who may act out has a reason for that. As frustrating as it may be, it is our responsibility to uncover that reason and try to help. You won't be able to fix everything, but you can try. Junior high students also need structure, predictability, consistency, and routine... but mostly love.
  • Slide 28
  • Procedures (Expectations) and Consequences Current Trends PBISPositive Behavioral Inventions and Support RTIResponse to Intervention
  • Slide 29
  • THE FIRST DAY Greet students, get them to know each other Student seating Inform students about the class Define your expectations Assign Homework
  • Slide 30
  • Provide Closure Thank students for taking part of your class Celebrate Take Time to Transition THE LAST DAY
  • Slide 31
  • Be Consistent Be Fair THE DAYS IN-BETWEEN
  • Slide 32
  • Teacher Stare- Down
  • Slide 33
  • Directions Back to each other, count of three, turn around First one to blink, look away, or laugh loses In the event of a tie, both participants turn back around and do it again The winner takes place in a three-way showdown in the middle of the room.
  • Slide 34
  • Classroom Control and Discipline
  • Slide 35
  • -Control is one of the top concerns -Discipline and control - Reflects philosophy
  • Slide 36
  • -Prevent inappropriate behavior -help develop self control -different ways of dealing with behavior 3 Step Plan
  • Slide 37
  • Control -Direct instruction -Monitoring -Modeling - Low profile discipline - Personal items
  • Slide 38
  • Discipline
  • Slide 39
  • -Nondisruptive behaviors -Disruptions to learning -Serious- cheating, stealing, violence, bullying -PBISPBIS
  • Slide 40
  • -BF Skinner: Behavior Modification - Assertive Discipline: students know what is expected -Reasons behind rules, what is expected, consistent
  • Slide 41
  • Logical Consequences -Help children develop internal understanding of self control and a desire to follow the rules --Student involvement -Behavior is the problem not the child -Warnings -Tone of voice
  • Slide 42
  • Break Time (10 minutes)
  • Slide 43
  • Workshop
  • Slide 44
  • Classroom Management Discussion
  • Slide 45
  • Create-a-Classroom Activity Reasonable budget Desk arrangements Your desk Wall/ posters Class policies Reflects philosophy/ teaching style
  • Slide 46
  • Go Forthand Teach! What Teachers Make Taylor Mali Miracle Worker Taylor Mali