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  • 7/31/2019 JTNews | November 2, 2012

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    w w w . j t n e w s . n e t n n o v e m b e r 2 , 2 0 1 2 n 1 7 h e s h v a n 5 7 7 3 n v o l u m e 8 8 , n o . 2

    JEWISHWaSHIngton v fJTnews

    a jewish policemanpage 9tzedakah time!center section

    Life after the GulagThe catalyst of the Soviet Jewry movement talks about life after prisonOn page 7

    @jew_ish @jewishca/jtnewsprofessionalwashington.com

    connecting our local Jewish community

    photo by emily k. alhadeff

  • 7/31/2019 JTNews | November 2, 2012

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    2 israel: to your health JtN . www.JtNews.Net . friday, November 2, 201

    ExpEt SpEakES

    AJC Seattle First Annual Advocacy In Action

    Community Reception & Campaign Event

    Promoting Solutions For Energy Security

    Insight. Action. Impact.

    David Harris

    AJC Executive Director

    Michael Granoff

    Head of Oil Independence

    Policies for Better Place

    Sunday, December 2, 2012

    Seattle Art Museum 6:00pm - 8:30pm

    Wine & Hors doeuvres Reception and Panel Discussion

    E E nt C h ai

    Adam Goldblatt

    hna CittEE

    Mark Bloome Allen & Carol Gown Herb Bridge & Edie HilliardRon Leibsohn Doug & Deborah Rosen

    Joe & Judy Schocken Don & Goldie Silverman

    Event Fee: $36 per person

    Donation at event of $180 to 2012 campaign

    Private Pre-Reception for 2012 Marshall Society ($1250) donors

    Sp by november 29

    Seattle

    seattle@ajc.org

    206.622.6315

    RSVP

    Denis Stevens

    Consul General of

    Canada in Seattle

    RSVP

    by November 29

    at

    www.ajcseattle.org

    X Page

    2013

    110 East 59th Street, New York, NY 10022 212.931.0127 info@TheCharlesBronfmanPrize.com

    The Charles Bronfman Prize celebrates the vision and endeavoro an individual or team under fty years o age whose humanitarian

    work, combined with their Jewish values, has signifcantly improved the

    world. Its goal is to recognize dynamic humanitarians whose innovation,

    leadership, and impact provide inspiration or the next generations.

    An internationally recognized panel o Judges

    selects the Prize recipient(s) and bestows an

    award o $100,000. For inormation about the

    nomination process, to download nomination

    guidelines and orms, and to read about prior

    recipients, please visit

    www.TheCharlesBronfmanPrize. com

    providing

    inspiration

    to

    the

    next

    generat

    ions

    JEWISHVALUES.G

    LOBALIMPACT.

    www.facebook.com/TheCharlesBronfmanPrize

    The public call for nominations from around the world

    is open November 1, 2012 to January 15, 2013.

    accepting

    nominations

    Ttn czpn bf t tt

    Janis siegel JtNw Columni h e l a t e s t r e s e a r c h

    approach o an Israeli doctor

    and his team in the treat-

    ment o schizophrenia might

    simply be summed up as the

    earlier, the better.reating schizophrenia in

    young people beore they have

    their rst episode is a contro-

    versia l method, but during

    the last decade, ongoing stud-

    ies by Dr. Uriel Heresco-Levy

    show that an intervention tar-

    geted to glutamates, one o

    two major neurotransmitters in the brain,

    wont prevent the occurrence o the disease,

    but may improve a patients outcome over

    a lietime. Neurotransmitters allow brain

    cells to communicate with each other.

    Heresco-Levy is the director o the

    Schizophrenia Research Program and

    the Department o Psychiatry at Herzog

    Memorial Hospital, an asso-

    ciate proessor at Hadassah

    Medical School, and a leader in

    this prevention work. He was

    part o a 2012 study on this

    research recently published inSchizophrenia Bulletin.

    One aspect o this

    increased emphasis is to high-

    light the potential damage asso-

    ciated with delays in treatment

    o early phases o psychotic ill-

    ness, wrote Heresco-Levy.

    Recent data indicate that the

    duration o untreated psychosis in schizo-

    phrenias rst episodes consistently predicts

    outcome independently o other variables.

    Tere is a growing body o evidence sug-

    gesting that changes in the neurotransmit-

    ter system, possibly caused by deects in the

    early development o the neurotransmitter

    processes, may be a root cause or the onset

    o this disease. Te glutamate system, which

    may be altered in schizophrenia, could be

    unctioning below optimum levels.

    Tis type o neurotransmitter therapy

    is not the only approach researchers are

    taking in the quest to manage this disease,or which there is no cure. Drug therapies,

    however, have several negative side eects.

    Teir use implies patient exposure to

    a variety o side eects, including motor,

    Parkinsons disease-like symptoms, and

    metabolic side eects, e.g. obesity, blood

    sugar level elevation that characterize sec-

    ond-generation antipsychotic drugs, said

    Heresco-Levy.

    During the last decade, our group has

    contributed extensively to the develop-

    ment and establishment o a novel class o

    medications to be used in psychotic dis-

    orders such as schizophrenia, and in ill-

    nesses such as autism, Post-raumatic

    Stress Disorder, and Parkinsons disease,

    he added.

    Tese medications typically contain

    glycine, D-serine, and sarcosine, natural

    amino acids present in the human body

    that have the advantage o being prac-

    tically devoid o signicant side eects,

    Heresco-Levy said. By now, studies per-

    ormed by our and other research groups

    have demonstrated that these compounds

    have the capacity to signicantly alleviate

    negative symptoms and cognitive deci

    in schizophrenia subjects.

    Scientists in the eld believe that sev

    eral genes may contribute to the risk

    developing the disease. Additionally, th

    suspect that those with schizophrenhave a greater occurrence o rare genet

    mutations and that these mutations, wi

    hundreds o dierent genes, may disrup

    brain development.

    At an early age, typically between 1

    and 30, according to the National Institu

    o Mental Health, an individual at risk

    schizophrenia will maniest his or her r

    ully blown episode o the disease. Schiz

    phrenia is a broad term or a disease th

    includes many kinds o symptoms such

    psychotic hallucinations and delusions,

    more subtle ones, such as impairments

    cognition, learning, socializing, apathy, an

    a general blunted aect, which can al

    impact attention and memory.

    Schizophrenia oen limits the lielon

    potential o those who suer rom it an

    it can change the trajectory o their live

    stunting the success o ones educatio

    and preventing successul and ongoin

    employment.

    Although schizophrenia maniests itse

    in only 1 percent o population in gener

    ISraEl:To Your Health

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    friday, november 2, 2012 . www.jtnews.net . jtnws

    opinion

    This was the kind of book that was parve. You could learn your science and still appreciate being a Jew.

    Stroum lecturer Professor David Ruderman, on the best-selling book Sefer HaBrit. See the story on page 6.

    tHE rabbIS turn

    awknn dmnt

    Rabbi Chaim levine hop for hroimWhat is it about hero-

    ism that moves us so much?Why is it that when we wit-

    ness human beings putting

    their lives on the line to help

    another we eel so inspired

    that we tell their stories long

    aer they are gone? We write

    books about them, and memo-

    rialize them in lm. Why?

    Tere is no way seless-

    ness, heroism, and sacriice

    could bring us to tears i it wasnt connected

    to something at the very core o who each o

    us is and why we are on this earth. When we

    see another person going beyond himsel, it

    awakens our own dormant hero. Tat part

    within us rejoices in the purity o giving to

    another without any thought o personal

    gain or recognition.

    I am blessed beyond what I can express

    with being surrounded by those people

    in the Jewish nation who were in circum-

    stances where, without exaggeration, this

    kind o pure heroic giving took place every

    day. Im talking o course about the injured

    hayalim soldiers I have met through

    my involvement in Hope or Heroism. I

    realized recently, however, that there are

    those among the Jewish people whose hero-

    ism and selessness is no less great than our

    injured soldiers, albeit largely unrecognized.

    In 2006 Captain Roi Klein was involved

    in one o the most brutal battles in the

    second Lebanon war against Hezbollah

    terrorists. Roi and his soldiers were caught

    in a terrible ambush in the village o Bing-

    bel. Space in this article does not allow me

    to go into detail o the battle, but o the

    dozens o grenades thrown by the terror-

    ists at Roi and his soldiers, one suddenly

    landed right in the midst o them. Imagine

    or just a second that you were there. In

    that terrible moment, what happens next?

    Without hesitation Roi did what he elt

    he must do to take care o h

    soldiers. He leapt on the grnade in an attempt to prote

    their lives.

    wo o the soldiers wh

    were near him at that mome

    told me that as Roi lande

    on the grenade, he said th

    Shema Yisrael prayer, wi

    the ervor and passion th

    write about in the books

    the Pr