hush hush - a group show 30 may - 17 june 2017 hush hush smith is delighted to present hush hush, a

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  • HUSH HUSH - a group show 30 May - 17 June 2017

  • HUSH HUSH

    SMITH is delighted to present HUSH HUSH, a group photography exhibition seeking to test the scope of the contemporary photographic medium as an

    experimental art form. The exhibition will run from 30 May – 17 June 2017. Eight inimitable artists have been invited to contribute work to HUSH HUSH,

    all of whom share a particular concern with the reinvention of the photographic landscape. While their means of manipulation differ as vastly as the various

    methods and materials used, in each case the artist is an active participant in the fabrication of the final image. HUSH HUSH hones in on the way in which

    intentional intrusions into a chosen landscape, scene or still life fundamentally changes the image that is finally captured by a camera, thus blurring – and in

    some cases obliterating – the line between where an artist ends and an image begins.The artists involved are Nico Krijno, Thandiwe Msebenzi, Paris Brummer,

    Johno Mellish, Bert Pauw, Andile Buka, Mitchell Gilbert Messina and Ashley Walters.

    Nico Krijno’s three works explore the space between photography, painting and ephemeral sculpture. Krijno combines two-dimensional works with in-situ

    temporary installations, which reference the formalism of wall-based art worked.

    “I am deeply fascinated by the tension I sense beneath the surface of things, particularly that which underlies the everyday and the mundane. So, sometimes

    by showing things out of context or by marrying opposites I try to force a conversation that combines irony, humour and melancholy,” says Krijno.

    Thandiwe Msebenzi’s sole work, ‘Ingubo’, uses the scaffolding of colour, material and symbolism in setting – and then capturing – a pastoral early morning

    scene against which her views on manhood and family are projected.

    “In my family there is a belief that when you dream of someone in a green and lush area, that often speaks of death. The lush green eludes to the idea of

    paradise, a space known for its abundance of beauty,” says Msebenzi.

    Paris Brummer’s contribution confronts the challenge of photographing human beings as objects in a still life, treating them as no more or less significant

    than the objects surrounding them. To this end Brummer’s photographs, taken at a local flea market near Cape Town, depict most of the subjects with their

    backs turned to the viewer.

    “These objects blend in amongst the found and dilapidated allowing the photographed situations to present themselves as still-lives,” says Brummer.

    Bert Pauw’s white statue of the Goddess Nike adorned with cheap and garish clothes pegs is mounted flush against the wall to blur the division between

    photographic print, frame and gallery space. The work is accompanied by a blue LED light, which is projected from an ADT security device mounted on the

    wall. The purchased work will come with a 12-month security subscription to ADT.

  • “I am drawn to seemingly mundane functional objects from my environment, objects that have a subjective significance to me. This installation, ‘The Mess

    of Polished Icons’ is inspired by the entropy of kaggelkakkies, camping at ATKV resorts, high walls, white Plascon PVA and the danger of being cosy,” says

    Pauw.

    Andile Buka’s inclusion of a repeated object – in this case a bicycle - against various backdrops is a contrivance of the point and shoot photographic tactic.

    The deliberate corruption of these otherwise unassuming scenes imbues his images with tension as the imposed object variously fits or jars with its

    surrounds.

    With his series Rosetta 3301, Johno Mellish traces the steps of conspiracy theorist Elizabeth Klarer who, in her autobiographical text Beyond the Light

    Barrier (1980), claimed to have encountered extraterrestrials in and around the Drakensberg mountains in Kwazulu-Natal.

    Mellish set about following these questionable leads by photographically reimagining the events described in Klarer’s book and, by doing so, calling into

    question the nature of photography to validate or prove truth while attempting to separate photography from its relationship to the so-called Real.

    “If photography can’t or fails to represent the Real, then something you might ask yourself is, what are we left with?” says Mellish.

    Ashley Walters, meanwhile, vacillates between complicity and indifference with the subject of his photographs. His work emphasises a non-spectacular

    representation of reality; where some images show scenes of intimate, inhabited spaces, others invade non-territories that indicate uprootedness, scarring

    and anxiety.

    “In Monster, for example, I’m exploring the relationship between spatiality and social ordering within the representation of this place and the different

    communities, gangs, religious and cultural groups, and landscape architecture,” says Walters.

    Mitchell Gilbert Messina’s fundamental mistrust of the camera as a conduit for expression led him to construct an entirely virtual still life. With Portfolio

    on Persian Rug, Messina’s fabricated image exists as a framing device for an assortment of other images – news clippings, reviews of his work - displaying a

    visual portfolio acting as an engineered self-portrait.

    “I’m kind of terrible at taking photos because there’s always a large gap between my expectation of the image and what the camera actually captures. So

    constructing a virtual image bypasses all of that in a way, it allows you to skip the effort of taking the photo and just start directly in post,” says Messina.

  • Nico Krijno, Carcinus, 2017, Inkjet print on cotton photo rag paper, 85 x 60cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 40,000

  • Nico Krijno, Sculpture Study With Steel And Purple, 2017, Inkjet print on cotton photo rag paper, 60 x 85cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 40,000

  • Nico Krijno, Potato Palm, 2017, Inkjet prints on cotton photo rag paper, 85 x 60cm, Edition 3 of 5, R 40,000

  • Thandiwe Msebenzi, Ingubo, 2015, German etching archival paper, 30 x 20 cm, R 8,000

  • Paris Brummer, ‘Is it second-hand if I loved it first?’ Exhibit A, 2017, Photograph printed on paper, 30 x 21cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 2,000

  • Paris Brummer, ‘Is it second-hand if I loved it first?’ Exhibit B, 2017, Photograph printed on paper, 30 x 21cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 2,000

  • Paris Brummer, ‘Is it second-hand if I loved it first?’ Exhibit C, 2017, Photograph printed on paper, 30 x 21cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 2,000

  • Paris Brummer, ‘Is it second-hand if I loved it first?’ Exhibit D, 2017, Photograph printed on paper, 30 x 21cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 2,000

  • Paris Brummer, ‘Is it second-hand if I loved it first?’ Exhibit E, 2017, Photograph printed on paper, 30 x 21cm, Edition 1 of 5, R 2,000

  • Bert Pauw, Suspecting Obsolescence, 2017, Pigment print on Hannemuhle photo rag, 80 x 100cm, Edition of 5 + 2AP, R 12,000

    Bert Pauw, I’m Not Worried (but I am), 2017, Blue/red LED, 0,5 x 0,5 x 0,5cm , R25,000 (Includes installation and a 12 month ADT subscription)

    Bert Pauw, Silent Indications of Pandora, 2017, Wood and photographs, 25 x 15 x 20cm, R 4,500

  • Johno Mellish, Incoming , 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 82 x 66cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 7,000

  • Johno Mellish, Incoming II, 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 66 x 65cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 8,000

  • Johno Mellish, View of landing Photography spot (To the left), 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 101 x 82cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 10,000

  • Johno Mellish, Rose Red, 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 45 x 55cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 4,500

  • Johno Mellish, Evidence of Disturbance, 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 101 x 82cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 10,000

  • Johno Mellish, Flying Object I, 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 32 x 28cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 3,000 (Detail)

    Johno Mellish, Flying Object II, 2016, Photograph on cotton rag, 32 x 28cm, Edition of 6 + AP, R 3,000

  • Ashley Wlaters, Black Sheep, 2011, Archival pigment ink on cotton paper, 57 x 86cm, Edition 7 of 10 + 2AP, R 15,000

  • Ashley Walters, Migration, Hong Kong, 2017, Archival pigment ink on cotton paper, 80 x 115cm, Edition 1 of 5 + 2AP, R 20,000

  • Ashley Walters, Monster, Ravensmead Annual High School Fair, Ravensmead, 2013, Archival pigment ink on cotton paper,

    78 x 112cm, Edition 3 of 10 + 3AP, R 18,000

  • Andile Buka, Transitions |These Goodbyes, 2015, Photograph printed on paper, 21 x 31cm, Edition 1 of 3, R 7,500

    Andile Buka, Transitions | Into Forever, 2015, Photograph printed on paper, 21 x 31cm, Edition 1 of 3, R 7,500

  • Andile Buka, Transitions | As I Walk, 2015, Photograph printed on paper, 21 x 31cm, Edition 1 of 3, R 7,500 Andile Buka, Transitions | The Land Of, 2015, Photograph printed on paper, 21 x 31cm, Edition 1 of 3, R 7,500

  • Mitchell Messina, Portfolio on Persian Rug, 2017, Digital print on perspex mount, 84 x 119cm, Edition of 5 + AP, R 10,000

  • www.smithstudio.co.za | info@smithstudio.co.za | 021 422 0814