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Método para Concertina de Paul de Ville

TRANSCRIPT

THE COIVCERTIMami

Hon/ To Plaj/Itby

Paul de Ville

InducHng 250 Patriqik

and Sacred Songs

and

well

known Melodies

2.00

Carl FischerInc.

02311'^P'ZJf

>'JS^&f/Hr'*M

Digitized by the Internet Archivein

2010

http://www.archive.org/details/concertinahowtopOOdevi

THE COWCERTmAand

How Toby

Play

It

Paul de Ville

Including

250

Patriotic

and Sacred Songs

and

well

known Melodies

Carl03311

Fischer,

inc.

Copyright 1905

by

Carl Fischer.

NewU.S A.

York

Pnmd

in

RudimentsMusicI,

of

Musicear;it is

Let us say to the beginner, here at the start, that no art, science or branch of industry can be successfully mastered or acquired, unless the strictest attention is paid to the rudiments or first principles.is

the art of combining sounds in aII,

manner agreeable to the

divided into two parts,

Melody,

Harmony.combination of sounds which by their elevation, duration and succession, serve to form aanother combination of sounds which by their spontaneous union serve to form chords.

Melodytune.

is a

Harmony

is

STAFFwritten with seven figures called Notes: they are named from the first seven letters of the alphabet and aie placed upon and between five parallel lines, called the Staff or Stave.is

Music

\

4tll

rt||i'"e

j '

srdllne

and

line

1st line

The

lines

and spaces are counted upwards,

tlie

lowest being called the first line or space.

LE GER LINESthe instrument requires a greater compass than the staff, small lines called Leger lines are added, below the staff for the

When

lower notes, and above for the upper notes.

THE NOTES

IN

ROTATIOND

B

r

a

Treble Clef

Bass ClefCItI>

will bein a

observed that

in

continuous scales a note of the same name

may occur

several times, but al-

ways

different position.

THE FORM AND VALUE OF NOTESThe value or duration of a note or ofserves to illustrate this:a restis

determined by the form of the same. The followinp Table

TABLEOne Whole Note(or

one Bar)

oU theequiv.iji nt of

two half notes,or 4 quai ter notes,or 8 eighth notes,

T

I

r

r

or 16 sixteenth notes,

^_jf

^ ^f fCSS3E3

^f f

g_^

g_J

^

f

|

or

32 thirty-second

notes,

fTf ff

f* *f ff

^^^^9 BSBSS9or

BSBSB tSSBIS CSCSCS &ICSSS TJJ* b^SSS

t^* f f ff f f ff

e4 sixty-fourth notes. f*f^fTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTfTTTTfTTTfTTTTTTTTTTf?TTT*TT^*TT***^**Tf

RESTSARestis

a character indicating a temporary suspension of sound, or pause, while playing. Thereit

is

a rest

to correspond with each note, and

has the same value

in

regard to duration of time as the note.16th Rest

Whole Rest

Half Rest

Quarter Rest

Eighth Re^t

32nd Rest

G4tiiResl

Coiiuted flame

a.'^

a

Whole Note

2Rests, (or pauses)

3

4

10

20

beyond the extant of a

singlej'

bar are indicated by numbers thus:_

I

DOTS.Dot, placed after- a Note or a Dotted Whole, Dotted Rest, increases the value or duration of that Note or Rest one half of its original value.

A

Half, Dotted^Quartw, Dott< Bglith, Potted Sixteenth,

A j: ample.

When two dotsa note or a

are placed after

rest.Ihe sf-rond dot hasEj-rt inplc.

half the value oft lie first.

BARS.Jlusicis

divided into cquil por.

The space and contents between two Bars

is

called

a

tions by linesstaff,

drawn

t4jrough the

called Bars, thus:

_

3 Measure, or Bar of music Each bar or measure conJ tains an equal value of notes. Or rests, according to the time indicated at the commencement of the piece.

Double Bars are used to divide a piece of music itlto two, three or more parts, called STRAINS, and are always placed at the end of a Strain or piece of music. When dots are placed on one side of the double bar, the part on the same side as the dots is to be repeated. When dots are.placed on both sides of the double bar, both parts are to be repeated.

TIME.The following" are the figures used to indicate the different kinds of time, most generally usedCommon time,*' Two-four, Three-four, Tliree-twn, Three-eight, Six-eight, Nine-eight, Twelve-eight,

*'The figureC

is

more generally used than 4 Either one indicates Common Time.

of the various kinds of time. time has four beats or counts to a bar. In all cases, the upper figure of the time-mark signifies the NlTMBERof notes, and the lower, the KIND of no1i.-s or their equivalent in the measure.

The following Examples show the manner of counting some

Common

EXAMPLES.

The

wiird

rt7/rf is

used

to iiidicafe the half

i.f

a beat.

I

i.

.3

12H4.1

tandaaud:ijndH

\

i

"7.

I

^ ifi

landa 3

i

ZH

ia.3

(or tliesameas two-fuur time)

12

3

7H

1

a

3

4

5

?8M

li;34.iH

3H

ta

i

4.iH

in

H

('

(or the

L

t same as three

*

'-

four-time)

.,

\

1

aS

3

12loll12

3

I

-4

:i

K345H

7KM

Ii>lll2

12

4

5

H

?8

1234.';

7N

loll

Iz

H '(.)- 59

'

SHARPS, FLATS, AND NATURALS.

In order to alter the tone or pitch of a note, characters called Sharps and Flats are used.A Sharp ($) placed before a note, raises it half a tone. A Flat ([>) placed before a note, lowers it half a tont The Natural (1;) restores the note, which has been changed by the $ or h, to its former position. The Double Sharp (x) raises a note naif a tone higher than the simple would raise it.

The Double Flat (H>) lowers a note half a tone lower than the simple The IfJI and ^[> brings the note which has been raised by the k or lowered by the H> hack again by half a tone. they are called the Signature, and desfl j When Sharps or Flatsareplaced "r ^zg= ignate what key the piece is iir. at the commencement of a piece,\>.

^ cf When so placcd,theyaffecf all notes throughout the piece beanng the same name as the lines or spaces on which they are placed. For example, a sharp placed on the fifth line,immediately after theclef, thus:

.^

~

} ^

1

1.

3?^^

Q ^

which"''"''*

is

F,

(in the

Treble

clef),

sig-

^

^hat

ALL the Fs,whether higfr

or low, are to be played sharp, except when contrartictedby a natural.

tions,

musical composiBesides being used for the signature of a piece, sharps and fiats are introduced in the and are then called Accidentals. An Accidental # t or placed before a note, affects all following notes of the same name in that bar ONLY.i;

THE

TIE,

SLUR, TRIPLET,

Etc.

The Tie, or Bind, is a curved line placed over or under two notes, occupying the same line or space, and indicates that the first note only is played,and the sound prolonged the valueof the two notes. The Slur is a curved line placed over or under two or more notes,occupyingon the staff,and signifies that they are Example:a smooth and connected manner. Notes with Dots,or Dashes placed over or under them, are to be played short and distinct; which is termed staccato.different positions

to be played in

Examples:

Whealistinct.

marked with

the Dash, tney are played

very short and

When the figure T" and a slur are placed over or under a groap oflhree notes, the group is termed a TRIPLET, and the three are Example:played in the time of two liotes of the same value. which is termed a Pause or Hold, \v hen placed over a note or rest, indicates that the This Sign player can nold the note or rest beyond its regular time. When this sign -=r is met with, it signifies that the sound of the notes under which it is placed luusv be gradually increased from soft to \onAj the -worA crescendo or crf*