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This collection of folk music, compiled by Stan Paregien Sr, contains both the lyrics and the guitar chords for some of the most popular American folk songs. This material is presented, free of charge, purely for educational and instructional use.

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  • Folk Music Collection

    Collected by Stan Paregien Sr

    stanparegien@gmail.com

    The following pages contain some of my favorite folk songs, complete with

    both the lyrics and with the guitar chords.

    These songs are presented here at no charge. We simple list them for your

    information and instruction. It is not our intention to violate anyone's

    legitimate copyright.

    If you have an objection to a song being listed here--and you are a person

    with legal standing in the matter, then we will be glad to resolve any issue you

    may have.

    To everyone else, here's hoping you enjoy playing these great old songs as

    much as I do.

  • OKLAHOMA HILLS by Woody Guthrie

    He wrote this in 1937. His cousin Jack Guthrie recorded it without his permission in 1944. Through a big hit with it. As a

    compromise with Capitol Records, Woody Guthrie was given co-authorship. Copyright renewed 1973 by

    Michael H. Goldsen, Inc. Named the official Oklahoma Woody Guthrie state Folk Song in Nov. 2001

    1. [D] Many months have come and gone

    Since I [G] wandered from my [E] home

    In those [A] Oklahoma Hills where I was [D] born

    Many a page of life has turned

    Many a [G] lesson I have [E] learned

    Yet I [A] feel like in those hills I still be- [D] long.

    CHORUS

    [D] 'Way down yonder in the Indian nation

    I [G] rode my pony on the reser- [E] vation

    In those [A] Oklahoma Hills where I was [D] born

    Way down yonder in the Indian nation

    A [G] cowboy's life is my occu- [E] pation

    In those [A] Oklahoma Hills where I was [D] born.

    2. But as I sit here today

    Many [G] miles I am a- [E] way

    From the place I rode my [A] pony through the [D] draw

    Where the Oak and Blackjack trees

    Kiss the [G] playful prairie [E] breeze

    In those [A] Oklahoma Hills where I was [D] born.

    3. As I turn like a page

    To the [G] land of the great O- [E] sage

    To those [A] Oklahoma Hills where I was [D] born

    Where the black oil rolls and flows

    And the [G] snow-white cotton [E] grows

    In those [A] Oklahoma Hills where I was [D] born. [G] [D]

  • This Land Is Your Land

    Words & music by Woody Guthrie of Okemah, Okla. Feb. 23, 1940. Since he could not read music, he

    put this song to the melody of an old favorite of the Carter Family titled, This World Is On Fire. He wrote his song in 1940 to counteract a song he thought wrongly present a siruppy, all-is-well view of

    America; that song was Irving Berlins God Bless America, a big hit at that time for Kate Smith. Here is the song as Woody wrote it, with a clear Marxist advocacy of the abolishment of private

    property rights and the establishment of communal property .

    [REPEAT AS CHORUS]

    1. [G] This land is [C] your land.

    This land is [G] my land,

    From Cali -[D] fornia [D7] to the New York [G] island.

    From the redwood [C] forest, to the Gulf Stream [G] waters-

    [D] This land was [D7] made for you and [G] me.

    2. [G] As I was [C] walking that ribbon of [G] highway

    I saw a- [D] bove me [D7] that endless [G] skyway,

    I saw be- [C] low me that gold en [G] valley;

    [D] This land was [D7] made for you and [G] me.

    3. I've roamed and [C] rambled and I followed my [G] footsteps

    To the sparkling [D] sands [D7] of her diamond [G] deserts;

    And all a - [C] round me a voice was [G]sounding:

    [D] This land was [D7] made for you and [G] me.

    4. When the sun came [C] shining, and I was [G] strolling,

    And the wheat fields [D] waving [D7] and the dust clouds [G] rolling.

    As the fog was [C] lifting, a voice was [G] chanting:

    [D] This land was [D7] made for you and [G] me.

    5. As I went [C] walking, I saw a [G] sign there,

    And on [D] the sign it said [D7] "No Tres- [G] passing."

    But on the [C] other side it didn't say [G] nothing.

    [D] That side was [D7] made for you and [G] me.

    6. In the shadow [C] of the steeple I saw [G] my people,

    By the [D] relief office I [D7] seen my [G] people;

    As they stood there [C] hungry, I stood there [G] asking

    [D] Is this land [D7] made for you and G] me?

    7. Nobody [C] living can ever [G] stop me,

    As I go [D] walking [D7] that freedom [G] highway;

    Nobody [C] living can ever make me [G] turn back

    [D] This land was [D7] made for you and [G] me.

  • So Long, Its Been Good to Know Yuh

    Words and music by Woody Guthrie (born in Okemah, Okla). Also known as Dusty Old Dust. Copyright 1940. He lived for a time, during the Dust Bowl, in Pampa (*Gray County), Texas. The Weavers had a hit in

    1951 with a different version, which Woody wrote in the studio on the spur of the moment. A long drought

    and poor farming methods led to the Dust Bowl days of the 1930's as tons of topsoil blew hundreds of miles

    away. The worst day was Black Sunday on April 14, 1935 when a wind clocked at 60 mph drove a wall of dust across southeast Colorado, southwest Kansas and the panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas. People starved

    out and left their farms for California and other places. John Steinbeck wrote vividly of that era in his novel,

    Grapes of Wrath.

    1. I've [C] sung this song, but I'll [G] sing it again,

    of the [C] place that I lived on the [G7] wild windy plains.

    In the [C] month called April, the [F] county called Gray*,

    and [C] here's what all of the [G7] people there did [C] say . . .

    CHORUS

    So long, . . . it's been good to know yuh. [G] So long, . . . it's been good to [C] know yuh.

    So [C7] long, . . . it's [F] been good to know yuh.

    This [C] dusty old dust is a- [G7] getting my home.

    And I've got to be drifting a- [C] long.

    2. A dust storm hit, an' it [G] hit like thunder,

    it [C] dusted us over, an' it [G7] covered us under.

    It [C] blocked out the traffic an' [F] blocked out the sun,

    and [C] straight for home all the [G7] people did [C] run, singin' . . .[repeat chorus]

    3. We talked of the end of the [G] world, and then,

    we'd [C] sing a song an' then [G7] sing it again.

    We'd [C] sit for an hour an' [F] not say a word,

    and [C] then these [G7] words would be [C] heard . . .

    4. Sweethearts sat in the [G] dark and sparked,

    they [C] hugged and kissed in that [G] dusty old dark.

    They [C] sighed and cried, [F] hugged and kissed,

    in- [C] stead of marriage, they [G7] talked like [C] this: Honey...

    5. Now, the [C] telephone rang, an' it [G] jumped off the wall,

    that [C] was the preacher, a- [G] makin' his call.

    He [C] said, "Kind friend, this [F] may be the end,

    an' you [C] got your last chance of sal- [G7] vation from [C] sin!"

  • Do Re Mi Words & music by Woody Guthrie. Copyrighted 1961.

    1. [G] Lots of folks back east, they say,

    [C] Leavin' home every [D7] day,

    [G] Beatin' the hot old dusty [C] way

    To the [G] Cali- [D7] fornia [G] line.

    Cross the desert sands they [C] roll

    Getting [G] out of that [D7] old dust [G] bowl.

    They [C] think they're going to a sugar [G] bowl.

    But here is what they [C] find:

    The [D7] police at the port of entry say,

    You're number fourteen-thousand for to- [G] day.

    CHORUS

    Oh, if you ain't got the do re me, folks, If you ain't got the do re [D7] mi, Why, you better go back to beautiful Texas,

    Oklahoma, Kansas, Georgia Tennes- [G] see.

    California is a garden of Eden,

    A paradise to live in or [C] see.

    But be- [G] lieve it or not

    You won't [C] find it so [G] hot,

    If you [D7] ain't got the do re [G] mi.

    2. If you want to buy you a home or farm,

    [C] That can't do nobody [D7] harm,

    Or [G] take your vacation by the mountains or [C] sea,

    Don't [G] swap your old [D7] cow for a [G] car,

    You'd better stay right where you [C] are.

    You [G] better take this [D7] little tip from [G] me,

    'Cause I [C] look through the want ads every [D7] day,

    But the headlines on the papers always [G] say . . .

    [REPEAT CHORUS]

  • Going Down the Road

    Words and music by Woody Guthrie and Lee Hayes. Copyright 1960. Also called, I Ain't Going to Be Treated this Way). References: Woody Guthrie's novel, Bound for Glory, and John Steinbeck's novel, Grapes of Wrath (and the films made of both books.) Many verses.

    I'm [G] blowin' down this old dusty road;

    Yes, I'm [C] blowin' down this old dusty [G] road.

    I'm [C] blowin down this old dusty [G] road, Lord God,

    And I [D7] ain't a-gonna be treated this a- [G] way.

    I'm going where the water tastes like wine.

    Yes, I'm [C] going where the water tastes like [G] wine.

    I'm [C] going where the water tastes like [G] wine, Lord God,

    And I [D7] ain't a-gonna be treated this a- [G] way.

    I'm going where them dust storms never blo