farm folk city folk summer 2012

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FarmFolkCityFolk is a not for profitsociety that works to cultivate alocal, sustainable food system. Ourprojects provide access to & protectionof foodlands; support local growers andproducers; and engage communities inthe celebration of local food.

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  • S UMM E R 2 0 1 2

    Farm & City working together to cultivate a local,

    sustainable food system

    New FFCF Logo.pdf 1 11-08-10 6:18 AM

    I N S I D E :

    Humanizing the Economy

    By Herb Barbolet

    One Jar at a TimeBy Allison Bell

    Plight of the BumblebeeBy Michael Marrapese

  • OKANAGANAUGUST 12THMETRO VANCOUVERSEPTEMBER 9THVANCOUVER ISLAND SEPTEMBER 16TH

    FarmFolk CityFolks annual local food celebration and fundraiser, Feast of Fields, has become a culinary tradition during harvest season. While drawing in the fresh country air, guests stroll across a farmers field, wine glass and linen napkin in hand, tasting the very best their region has to offer. The Feast highlights the connection between farmers and chefs who offer mouth watering creations using the freshest local, seasonal and sustainable ingredients. Accompanied by BC wines, beers and spirits, Feast of Fields is a gastronomic picnic for the palate.

    COME CELEBRATE WITH US!

    WWW.FEASTOFFIELDS.COM

    FoF2012_Ad_v2.indd 1 18-04-12 10:03 AM

  • 1 3 EDITOR IN cHIEfMIcHAEl MARRAPESEeditor@farmfolkcityfolk.ca

    ART DIREcTORDONNA SzElESTartdirector@nichemedia.ca

    cONTRIBUTORSMichael Marrapese, Nicholas Scapillati, Bonita Magee, Herb Barbolet, lori Petryk, Heather Pritchard, lindsay coulter, Sara Dent, Allison Bell, Robin Tunnicliffe, Jacqueline Scott

    ADVERTISINGRoy Kunicky, 250-306-5738 roy@nichemedia.ca

    PUBlISHERcRAIG BROWN NIcHE MEDIA craig@nichemedia.ca211 - 1433 St. Paul Street, Kelowna, Bc V1Y 2E4T. 250-868-2229 f. 250-868-2278www.nichemedia.ca farmfolk cityfolk Magazine is published quarterly. copies are available at local farmers markets, natural grocery outlets, and select wine stores. Subscriptions for those outside of our free distribution area are $36 per year. Views expressed in farmfolk cityfolk Magazine are those of their respective contributors and are not necessarily those of its publisher or staff. contents copyright 2012.Reproduction in whole or in part, by any means, without prior written permission, is strictly prohibited.

    Printed in canada.

    PUBlIcATIONS MAIl AGREEMENT NO. 41835528

    RETURN UNDElIVERABlE cANADIAN ADDRESSES TO:

    211 - 1433 ST. PAUl STREET, KElOWNA, Bc V1Y 2E4

    VOLUME 2 nUMbEr 5

    SUMMER 2012

    contentsfeatures

    Germinating the Next Generation .............. 13Preserving Our traditions ................................14strategies for small farm Viability ........20Canada upholds regulations ......................22 on fresh Dairy Processing

    COlumNsmessage from the executive Director .......5economics of food ....................................................6field Notes ........................................................................8foodPrints .................................................................... 10Hot topic ....................................................................... 16Good for You, Good for Our earth ....... 18

    DePartmeNtsWhats Out there? ..................................................12sustainability Heroes ........................................... 24Book review................................................................25Working together ................................................27

    COVEr PhOtO by brian harris: ranbir KahLOn in thE grEEnhOUsEs Of WindsEt farMs.

    4 SUMMER2012

    Errata. In our Spring 2012 issue we noted that any meat or meat products sold out of province or out of country must be processed by a class A or B licensed facility. A few readers pointed out that this is not the case. currently there are no abattoirs in Bc that are federally registered to process beef for export. There is one plant still doing pork, 11 doing poultry. In the last 2 to 3 years two federally licensed abattoirs, one in Dawson creek and one in Pitt Meadows, relinquished their federal licences and acquired provincial licences. Virtually all beef raised in Bc for large consumers markets is finished, processed and marketed outside of Bc, generating almost no economic value for Bc producers and processors.

    Thanks to Jillian Merrick, Abra Brynne and Kathleen Gibson.

    COVEr PhOtO by brian harris: ranbir KahLOn in thE grEEnhOUsEs Of WindsEt farMs.

  • the harvest has begun! If you are like me and you have been desperately waiting for the seasons bounty to begin then you will understand how excited I am. There is nothing like tasting the first sweet berries of the season, especially

    after such a long wet spring. But strangely enough as I devour these delicious treats my mind anxiously starts thinking of the need to preserve all of this goodness to last me through next winter.

    Home preserving has been a tradition in my family for generations and the secret ingredient has always been that we use the freshest local produce we can find. This time of year you can find great local produce in your grocery store or at the farmers market but if you want the freshest you have to go to the source... the farm. I love visiting farms not only because I like to see where my food comes from and I get to directly support my local farmer, but also because I love to meet the people who grow my food and hear their story.

    The first preserve we do each year is raspberry jam so this year, thanks to the cOABc website listings, my wife and I headed into the fraser Valley to find collin Regehr farms, an organic raspberry farm in Abbotsford. It sounds like an old distin-guished farm so you can imagine my surprise when we were greeted by 27 year old collin Regehr. But my surprise didnt end there. When I asked colin how long he had been certified organic he answered 8 years. So with some complicated math I quickly determined that he started this farm and the wise old age of 19!

    This is a wonderful and inspiring story but not an unfamiliar one these days. The Young Agrarian movement has taken off and in this issue of farmfolk cityfolk magazine you can read about how we are supporting this growing movement of new and young farmers. Also in this issue you will discover a wonderful article by Allison Bell about the joy and economic opportunities of preserving local food, a passionate call to action from our founder Herb Barbolet, an insight into our culture of working with seed by our farm Program Manager Heather Pritchard, an in-depth article from our editor Michael Marrapese on the plight of bees, and from lori Petryk, host of Good for You Good for Our Earth, some great tips on how to prioritize your organic food budget.

    These are just a few of the articles in this jam packed issue (pardon the pun). I hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoy bringing you these wonderful and important stories about how, together, we are rebuilding our food system.

    Nicholas scapillatiExecutive Director, farmfolk cityfolk

    Nicholas Scapillati is the Executive Director of FarmFolk CityFolk. He is a dedicated activist and conservationist and has worked on environmental sustainability issues

    for over 15 years. Urban agriculture has been a tradition in Nicholas family for generations which has cultivated his love of food and passion for cooking.

    W H O W E A R E

    farmFolk CityFolk is a not for profit society that is working to cultivate a local, sustainable food system. Our

    projects provide access to & protection

    of foodlands; support local growers and

    producers; and engage communities in the

    celebration of local food.

    farmfolk cityfolk has been supporting community-based sustainable food systems since October 1993. We have done this by engaging in public education with farm and city folks; actively organizing and advocating around local, timely issues; building alliances with other organizations; and harnessing the energy of our volunteers.

    Members of FarmFolk CityFolk get our magazine delivered right to their home or business. If you would like to support FarmFolk CityFolk by becoming a member or making a donation please contact us.

    location:FarmFolk CityFolk SoCiety main oFFiCe 1661DuranleauSt.,2nDFloor,

    netloFt,GranvilleiSlanD

    vancouver,Bcv6H3S3

    PHone:604-730-0450

    toll-FreeinBc:1-888-730-0452

    e-mail:inFo@FarmFolkcityFolk.ca

    WeB-Site:FarmFolkcityFolk.ca

    FolloWuSon

    farmfolk Cityfolk magazine 5

    A M E S S A G E f R O M T H E E X E c U T I V E D I R E c T O R

  • c O l U M N

    E c O N O M I c S O f f O O DRe-framing the PictureBy Herb BarboletPrefaceThis article is based upon thoughts first presented to The McConnell Foundation Sustainable

    Food Systems Workshop, then to The Food Energy Descent Action Plan at the Museum of Van-

    couver and a presentation to the Dialogue Course at SFU.

    Ill assume that if you are reading this then you are already aware of The Perfect Storm (no not the movie). Increasingly, the convergence of Peak Everything, cli-mate chaos, the financial Meltdown, fear Politics, Pandemics, et.al. is being called

    The Perfect Storm.

    These conditions, and so much more, led to a Global food crisis in 2008. And, since little has been done to ameliorate the underlying causes of these conditions, there have been and will be further global food crises.

    By making this statement some might understandably accuse me of also using fear politics. My response is that fear politics uses hyperbole and hypothetical situations (weapons of mass destruction, out-of-control crime, Irans nuclear capability) to manipulate the electorate. On the other hand, creating dialogue about the perfect storm potentially empowers people to collectively solve the problems.

    Try Goggling, How to Survive the coming food crisis, you will find more than 41 MIllION hits. Almost all of them are how to look aft