eecs498: autonomous robotics laboratory ¢â‚¬¢ armlab...

Download EECS498: Autonomous Robotics Laboratory ¢â‚¬¢ ArmLab ¢â‚¬£ Create a poster-Abstract, effective visuals ¢â‚¬¢

Post on 04-Jul-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • EECS498: Autonomous Robotics Laboratory

    Edwin Olson University of Michigan

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Course Overview • Goal: Develop a pragmatic understanding of both theoretical

    principles and real-world issues, enabling you to design and program robotic systems incorporating sensing, planning, and acting.

    • Course topics: ‣ Kinematics ‣ Inverse Kinematics ‣ Sensors & Sensor Processing ‣ Motors & Control ‣ Planning ‣ State Estimation ‣ Embedded Systems

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Evaluation

    • Two major labs, each with multiple check points.

    ‣ ArmLab ‣ BotLab

    • Midterm bonus

    Labs 30%

    Midterms 32%

    Final Project 32%

    Quizzes 5%

    Course Eval 1%

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Lab/Project Deliverables • In addition to short-response lab writeups:

    • ArmLab ‣ Create a poster

    - Abstract, effective visuals

    • BotLab ‣ Oral presentations (e.g. power point)

    • Final project ‣ Interactive demonstration in Tishman hall

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Course Policies • Collaboration ‣ “Peer programming”, not parallelization ‣ No use of outside resources ‣ Teams can share ideas, but not solutions/code

    • Group work certifications ‣ “I participated and contributed to team discussions on

    each problem, and I attest to the integrity of each solution. Our team met as a group on [DATE(s)].”

    ‣ Note any qualifications (we’re reasonable). ‣ Signatures

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Lateness

    • Assignments due at 11:59p; 10% lateness penalty per day; no credit after three days

    • Excused missed exams/quizzes ‣ Quizzes: not considered in grading ‣ Exams: oral make-up exams

    • Unexcused exams/quizzes: 0.

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Lab Policies • Food restricted ‣ Non-sticky beverages at stations ‣ Anything else discouraged, but some tolerance for

    responsible snacking away from workstation.

    • No removal of equipment without advance permission.

    • Notify staff of accidents, broken equipment.

    • Secret door code: XXXXXX Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Teams

    • ArmLab & BotLab ‣ Teams assigned by staff

    • Final project ‣ Student-selected teams

    • Peer Evaluations

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Teaming

    • Working on a team is an engineering problem in itself.

    • At the beginning of each lab, discuss ‣ When/where will you meet? ‣ What do you expect of each other? ‣ What will you do if problems arise?

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Final Projects • Scope ‣ Implement a more complicated algorithm ‣ Implement a system of multiple algorithms ‣ Develop a principled new algorithm ‣ Develop a compelling real-world implementation

    • Evaluation ‣ 50% Technical merit ‣ 25% Interactivity and engagingness of presentation ‣ 25% Web exhibit

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Course Resources • Email lists ‣ eecs498-staff@april.eecs.umich.edu ‣ eecs498@april.eecs.umich.edu

    ‣ Subscribe yourself at: http://april.eecs.umich.edu/ mailman/listinfo/eecs498

    • Wiki ‣ http://april.eecs.umich.edu/courses/eecs498_w12/wiki

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

    mailto:eecs498-staff@april.eecs.umich.edu mailto:eecs498-staff@april.eecs.umich.edu mailto:eecs498@april.eecs.umich.edu mailto:eecs498@april.eecs.umich.edu http://april.eecs.umich.edu/mailman/listinfo/eecs498 http://april.eecs.umich.edu/mailman/listinfo/eecs498 http://april.eecs.umich.edu/mailman/listinfo/eecs498 http://april.eecs.umich.edu/mailman/listinfo/eecs498 http://april.eecs.umich.edu/courses/eecs498_w12/wiki http://april.eecs.umich.edu/courses/eecs498_w12/wiki

  • Course Resources

    • Apps ‣ Peer evaluations ‣ Real-time course standing

    • Books ‣ There is no textbook.

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Shared lab space

    • Lab space is shared with 373 ‣ Creates some scheduling hazards!

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Lab Hours M T W R F

    8

    9

    10 Labture Labture

    11

    12

    1 Ols

    2 Ols/Mort

    3 Mort

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Cameras and Image Formation

    16

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • World Simplest Camera?

    • Just hold up a piece of film

    • Do we get an image on the film? ‣ For each piece of the film, where do the photons

    come from?

    The world Film

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • World Simplest Camera?

    • Just hold up a piece of film

    • Do we get an image on the film? ‣ For each piece of the film, where do the photons

    come from?

    The world Film

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • World Simplest Camera?

    • Just hold up a piece of film

    • Do we get an image on the film? ‣ For each piece of the film, where do the photons

    come from?

    The world Film

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • World Simplest Camera?

    • Just hold up a piece of film

    • Do we get an image on the film? ‣ For each piece of the film, where do the photons

    come from?

    The world Film

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • World Simplest Camera?

    • Just hold up a piece of film

    • Do we get an image on the film? ‣ For each piece of the film, where do the photons

    come from?

    The world Film

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • World Simplest Camera?

    • Just hold up a piece of film

    • Do we get an image on the film? ‣ For each piece of the film, where do the photons

    come from?

    The world Film

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Let’s add an aperture

    • An aperture blocks all but a small subset of the rays

    ‣ Causes the image to appear in focus!

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Aperture Size

    • Why not make the aperture super small? ‣ A “pin-hole” lens. ‣ Not enough light to “register” on our film

    • What happens when the aperture is bigger? ‣ More rays can fit through--- blurrier image

    • Is there any way of getting a sharp image, but allow more light through? ‣ Yes! A lens.

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Lenses

    • A lens collects rays with a particular divergence and refocuses them to a point.

    ‣ But points at the “wrong” distance won’t be refocused exactly. • Depth of field: how much of the scene is in focus

    • We’re going to ignore this today, however--- we’re going to assume a “pin-hole” model.

    f z

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Perspective Projection

    • The pinhole creates two similar triangles ‣ Allows us to determine x’ in terms of x

    f z

    x’

    x

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Perspective Projection

    • The pinhole creates two similar triangles ‣ Allows us to determine x’ in terms of x

    f z

    x’

    x

    x’ = -xf/z (why is it negative? we’ll assume from here on out that the camera “unflips” the image.)

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Perspective Projection

    • What are the pixel coordinates where the flame appears? ‣ x’ = fx/z + c ‣ Measure f in “pixels” and add an offset (so that the

    “middle” pixel is in the middle of the image)

    f z

    x’

    x

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Lens distortions

    • Unfortunately, real (imperfect) lenses further complicate life.

    Undistorted

    Pin cushion

    Barrel (common)

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Calibration

    • Often use a planar target • Compute geometrical

    relationship between points on (known) target and observed points.

    ‣ For planar targets: a “homography”

    • Optimize camera parameters to match observed images.

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Correcting for lens distortion

    • Radial Distortion 1. Compute the pixel coordinates assuming the lens is undistorted

    2. Convert to polar form

    3. Compute r’ = f(r)

    4. Convert r’ and θ back to Cartesian coordinates.

    • Function f() is typically nasty polynomial functions.

    ‣ We find the parameters by using non-linear optimization algorithms

    r,θ

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Color Cameras • Incoming light is described in terms of a power spectral density • “Color” isn’t a physical property of light ‣ It’s made up by our eyes and brain! ‣ Different types of incoming light can have the same “color”

    S Response

    M Response

    L Response

    Eye

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Just for fun...

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Bayer Patterns

    Wednesday, January 4, 12

  • Bayer Patterns

    • Why does this matter? ‣ At each pixel, two co