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  • Slide 1
  • Chapter 19 Matter in Motion Preview Section 1 Measuring MotionMeasuring Motion Section 2 What Is a Force?What Is a Force? Section 3 Friction: A Force That Opposes MotionFriction: A Force That Opposes Motion Section 4 Gravity: A Force of AttractionGravity: A Force of Attraction Concept Mapping
  • Slide 2
  • Chapter 19 Bellringer Write a formal description in your science journal of your position in the classroom using a reference point and a set of reference directions. For example, you might say, I sit three desks behind Ahmeds desk, or I sit 2 m east of the vent hood and 10 m north of the emergency shower. Then, write a similar description for your home, and for an object in your room. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 3
  • Chapter 19 Objectives Describe the motion of an object by the position of the object in relation to a reference point. Identify the two factors that determine speed. Explain the difference between speed and velocity. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 4
  • Chapter 19 Objectives, continued Analyze the relationship between velocity and acceleration. Demonstrate that changes in motion can be measured and represented on a graph. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 5
  • Chapter 19 Observing Motion by Using a Reference Point Motion is an objects change in position relative to another object, or reference point. The object that appears to stay in place is called a reference point. The direction of an objects motion can be described with a reference direction, such as north, south, east, west, up, or down. Common Reference Points The Earths surface is a common reference point for determining motion. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 6
  • Chapter 19 Motion Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 7
  • Chapter 19 Speed Depends on Distance and Time Speed is the distance traveled by an object divided by the time taken to travel that distance. The SI unit for speed is meters per second (m/s). Kilometers per hour (km/h), feet per second (ft/s), and miles per hour (mi/h) are other units commonly used to express speed. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 8
  • Chapter 19 Speed Depends on Distance and Time, continued Determining Average Speed Average speed equals the total distance divided by the total time. Recognizing Speed on a Graph Speed can be shown on a graph of distance versus time, as shown on the next slide. average speed total distance total time Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 9
  • Chapter 19 Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 10
  • Chapter 19 Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 11
  • Chapter 19 Velocity: Direction Matters The speed of an object in a particular direction is called velocity. Speed and velocity are two different terms with two different meanings. Velocity must include a reference direction. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 12
  • Chapter 19 Velocity: Direction Matters, continued Changing Velocity You can think of velocity as the rate of change of an objects position. An objects velocity is constant only if its speed and direction dont change. Combining Velocities You can combine different velocities to find the resultant velocity. The next slide shows how you can combine velocities to find the resultant velocity. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 13
  • Chapter 19 Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 14
  • Chapter 19 Acceleration The rate at which velocity changes over time is called acceleration. An object accelerates if its speed, or direction, or both change. An increase in velocity is commonly called positive acceleration. A decrease in velocity is commonly called negative acceleration, or deceleration. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 15
  • Chapter 19 Acceleration, continued Calculating Average Acceleration You can find average acceleration by using the equation: average acceleration final velocity starting velocity time it takes to change velocity Velocity is expressed in meters per second (m/s), and time is expressed in seconds (s). So acceleration is expressed in meters per second per second, or (m/s)/s, which equals m/s 2. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 16
  • Chapter 19 Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 17
  • Chapter 19 Acceleration, continued Recognizing Acceleration on a Graph Acceleration can be shown on a graph of velocity versus time. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 18
  • Chapter 19 Acceleration, continued Circular Motion: Continuous Acceleration An object traveling in a circular motion is always changing its direction. Therefore, its velocity is always changing, so it is accelerating. The acceleration that occurs in circular motion is known as centripetal acceleration. Section 1 Measuring Motion
  • Slide 19
  • Chapter 19 Bellringer Look around the room and think about the objects you see in terms of force. A force is always exerted by one object on another object. Then, answer the following questions in your science journal: Where do you see a force happening in the room right now? Which object is exerting the force, and which is receiving it? Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 20
  • Chapter 19 Objectives Describe forces, and explain how forces act on objects. Determine the net force when more than one force is acting on an object. Compare balanced and unbalanced forces. Describe ways that unbalanced forces cause changes in motion. Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 21
  • Chapter 19 Forces Acting on Objects In science, a force is simply a push or a pull exerted on an object in order to change the motion of the object. All forces have both size and direction. A force can change the acceleration of an object. This acceleration can be a change in the speed or direction of the object. Scientists express force using a unit called the newton (N). Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 22
  • Chapter 19 Forces Acting on Objects, continued Unseen Sources and Receivers of Forces It is not always easy to tell what is exerting a force or what is receiving a force. For example, you cannot see what exerts the force that pulls magnets to refrigerators. You cannot see that the air around you is held near Earths surface by a force called gravity. Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 23
  • Chapter 19 Determining Net Force Usually, more than one force is acting on an object. The net force is the combination all of the forces acting on an object. Determining net force depends on the directions of the forces. Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 24
  • Chapter 19 Determining Net Force, continued Forces in the Same Direction Two forces are added to determine the net force if the forces act in the same direction. The net force will be in the same direction as the individual forces. Forces in Different Directions If forces are acting in opposite directions, the net force can be found by subtracting the smaller force from the larger one. Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 25
  • Chapter 19 Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 26
  • Chapter 19 Balanced and Unbalanced Forces Balanced Forces When the forces on an object produce a net force of 0 N, the forces are balanced. Balanced forces will not cause a change in the motion of a moving object. Balanced forces do not cause a nonmoving object to start moving. Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 27
  • Chapter 19 Balanced and Unbalanced Forces, continued Unbalanced Forces When the net force on an object is not 0 N, the forces on the object are unbalanced. Unbalanced forces produce a change in motion, such as a change in speed or a change in direction. Unbalanced forces are necessary to cause a non- moving object to start moving, or to change the motion of moving objects. Section 2 What Is a Force?
  • Slide 28
  • Chapter 19 Bellringer Answer the following questions in your science journal: When was the last time you fell down? How did it happen? Suppose you and a younger sister or brother are at a neighborhood pool. Your sister or brother asks why there are signs that say NO RUNNING. What would be your answer? Where else do you see such cautionary signs? Section 3 Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion
  • Slide 29
  • Chapter 19 Objectives Explain why friction occurs. List the two types of friction,and give examples of each type. Explain how friction can be both harmful and helpful. Section 3 Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion
  • Slide 30
  • Chapter 19 The Source of Friction Friction is a force that opposes motion between two surfaces that are in contact. Friction occurs because the surface of any object is rough. Even surfaces that feel smooth are covered with microscopic hills and valleys. Section 3 Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion
  • Slide 31
  • Chapter 19 The Source of Friction, continued When two surfaces are in contact, the microscopic hills and valleys of one surface stick to the tiny hills and valleys of the other surface. This contact causes friction. Section 3 Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion
  • Slide 32
  • Chapter 19 The Source of Friction, continued The Effect of Force on Friction The amount of friction depends on the force pushi