Challenging the Status Quo : AWHONN 2004 Convention Raising Critical Questions About Nursing & Nursing Practices

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  • nNurses often run up against the because wevealways done it this way attitude in the workplace, especially when questioning a practice orproposing a new way of doing things. While

    this mindset exists in many organizations, that

    doesnt mean nurses have to like it or accept it.

    Challenging the Status Quo, the

    AWHONN 2004 Convention scheduled for

    June 26-30 in Tampa, FL., is about questioning

    established ways of thinking and empowering

    nurses to proactively chart a course for their

    profession that will yield the most beneficial

    outcomes for their patients and themselves.

    Through preconference workshops, panel

    discussions, learning labs and other education-

    al sessions, the 2004 Convention will address

    ways nurses can effectively challenge the status

    quo, enhance their clinical knowledge and

    skills, and deal with the many professional

    issues related to caring for women and for

    newborns. Topics include:

    Overcoming barriers to get things done

    Liability issues and risk management

    Pharmacology updates

    Pain management

    Nurse management and leadership

    An impressive array of speakers is already on

    board, including Brigadier General Wilma

    Vaught, USAF Ret., the driving force behind

    the creation of the Women of the American

    Military Memorial in Washington, DC, and

    Marianne Neifert, MD, known to millions

    through her parenting books, magazine and

    newspaper columns as Dr. Mom.

    In addition, the 2004 Convention will

    feature a wealth of additional opportunities

    for professional development and fun,

    including discussion of the hot clinical and

    legislative topics of the day through roundtable

    April | May 2004 AWHONN Lifelines 151

    Through pre-

    conference

    workshops, panel

    discussions, learning

    labs and other

    educational sessions,

    the 2004 Convention

    will address ways

    nurses can

    effectively challenge

    the status quo

    Challengingthe

    Status QuoAWHONN 2004 Convention

    Raising Critical Questions AboutNursing & Nursing Practices

  • breakfasts and the legislative lunch, interaction

    with institutions and vendors in the exhibit

    hall, career information and opportunities at

    the job fair and the ultimate celebration

    during the Presidents Party. Automated CE

    tracking will be available, and attendees will

    have the opportunity to earn 30+ hours of CE

    contact hours, including pharmacology CE

    credit.

    Located in beautiful and balmy Tampa, FL.

    the AWHONN 2004 Convention is an ideal

    opportunity to advance professional

    knowledge while adding your voice to those

    shaping the future of nursingas well as

    get in some beach time. The Tampa

    Convention Center hugs the water; during

    breaks you can stroll the water walk and

    watch the dolphins swim in the bay.

    Many of Tampas main attractions are

    easily accessible from the convention center

    and surrounding hotels either by foot, trolley

    or streetcar. For complete details on the

    AWHONN 2004 Convention, including

    housing and travel information, details on

    educational programming and links to the

    Tampa convention and visitors bureau,

    visit www.awhonn.org/convention.

    Consumers Warned Not toFeed Infants Better ThanFormula Ultra Infant ImmuneBooster 117

    FDA is warning consumers that BetterThan Formula Ultra Infant ImmuneBooster 117, sold over the Internet as a dietary

    supplement, should not be fed to infants. Even

    though the manufacturer, NSP Research Nutri-

    tion of Mt. Clemens, MI., labeled the product

    as a dietary supplement, the FDA is con-

    cerned that the product may be used as an

    infant formula as a result of its labeling. If the

    product is used as formula, there are no assur-

    ances that it would support growth of infants,

    that it contains nutrients essential for infants

    or that is has been manufactured using good

    practices. Also, the label lists a number of

    ingredients that have not been evaluated for

    safe use in infant formula.

    AWHONN Launches 35thAnniversary CommemorativeWeb Page

    In honor of its 35th anniversary, AWHONNhas posted a commemorative Web page athttp://www.awhonn.org/awhonn/?pg=872-

    9440-14180. Here youll find details on the

    organizations anniversary celebration activi-

    ties, a brief history of AWHONN and its

    accomplishments, as well as a special 35th

    anniversary logo.

    Nurses can share their memories and

    reflections on the last 35 years of nursing

    and AWHONN by e-mailing 35years@

    awhonn.org. Send us a few lines or a few pages

    with your thoughts on the changes youve seen,

    what being a nurse has meant to you, memo-

    rable experiences youve had or how

    AWHONN has influenced you. These reflec-

    tions may be published on www.awhonn.org

    for others to read and enjoy.

    New Funding for PediatricHeart Disease Centers

    The National Heart, Lung and Blood Insti-tute (NHLBI), one of the National Insti-tutes of Health (NIH), has awarded grants to

    four centers to accelerate research aimed at

    understanding heart development and treating

    pediatric heart disease.

    The research is part of a new program, the

    Specialized Centers of Clinically Oriented

    Research (SCCOR) program, which is designed

    to foster multidisciplinary collaborations so

    that basic research advances are rapidly trans-

    lated to clinical care. This research also sup-

    ports the NIH roadmap initiative unveiled last

    fall by NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, MD.

    Birth defects are a leading cause of infant

    mortality. Cardiovascular malformations,

    which are present in approximately 1 percent

    of live births, are the largest contributor to

    deaths from birth defects. Despite the enor-

    mous strides researchers have made in under-

    standing heart development at the cellular lev-

    el, in many cases the underlying cause of the

    cardiovascular defect is unknown. And while

    clinical advances have made medical and surgi-

    cal treatment of complex heart defects possible

    The National Heart,

    Lung and Blood

    Institute (NHLBI),

    one of the National

    Institutes of Health

    (NIH), has awarded

    grants to four centers

    to accelerate research

    aimed at

    understanding heart

    development and

    treating pediatric

    heart disease

    152 AWHONN Lifelines Volume 8 Issue 2

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