27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union Forest Law Enforcement and Governance: An IUCN View Dong Ke Forest Program Officer China Liaison Office IUCN

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<ul><li>Slide 1</li></ul> <p>27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union Forest Law Enforcement and Governance: An IUCN View Dong Ke Forest Program Officer China Liaison Office IUCN Photo Library Jim Thorsell Slide 2 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union What is FLEG FLEG stands for Forest Law Enforcement and Governance Aim: to promote greater transparency and accountability, and improve public confidence in how decisions on forests are made and implemented Regional Declaration: Africa FLEG (AFLEG) Europe and North Asia (ENA) FLEG East Asia Pacific (EAP) FLEG Trans-regional FLEG??( I dont know anything about this) Slide 3 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union FLEG Progress China Involved EAP FLEG: Bali, Sep 2001: EAP ministerial conference April 2002, UK-Indonesia MOU signed Aug. 2002, Action plan to implement it was agreed Dec. 2002, China- Indonesia MOU signed 2005, Japan indicated that it would adapt its central government procurement policy to exclude illegal products. Manila, 2006, EAP FLEG advisory group meeting Philippine, 2008, Steering Group meeting ENA FLEG: May 2004, the Russia Federation announced its interest in initiating the ENA FLEG during 4th session of UNFF June 2005, ENA preparatory conference took place in Moscow St, Petersburg Nov. 2005, Ministerial Declaration is adopted Russian National Action Plan? (could refer to Elenas presentation) Slide 4 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union IUCN and FLEG IUCN is a union of Government and NGO members with 50 years of experience convening multi-stakeholder consultations and shaping workable outcomes on sensitive issues Initiating or involved in multi-stakeholder national FLEG processes in more than 15 countries IUCN seeks forest governance arrangements that will deliver sustainable forest management and improve local livelihoods Equity, transparency and participation should be the cornerstones of responses at all levels to illegal logging and other predatory forest-related behaviour Slide 5 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union Some Challenges 1. Stakeholder participation: Problems too big to be solved by Governments alone CS and private sector support required ** Broadening the engagement beyond the forest sector 2. Planning and action: Translation into national and local action and being able to demonstrate/measure results 3. Continuity: Maintaining momentum after high profile events Learning lessons across FLEG countries and regions to build better processes and support implementation 4. Illegal logging and broader governance reform: Addressing domestic trade and non discerning markets Maintaining the linkage to poverty and sustainable development agendas Slide 6 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union What are some lessons learned? Governments, civil society and the private sector should not wait for national planning processes to be completed before taking action Tripartite approach should be encouraged and strengthened at all levels to facilitate appropriation of FLEG process by stakeholders NAP processes need ongoing capacity building, awareness raising, communications and networking; these can help to overcome some of the weaknesses of the regional process Need to reinforcing synergies and minimize gaps and overlap between the bilateral and international organizations that are interested in FLEG issues in each region Need to find the right incentives to invite the private sector Slide 7 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union Moving from Declaration to National Action Continue to strengthen FLEG in producer countries, such as Russia, Indonesia, and PNG Encourage China to discriminate between legally and illegally procured timber for imports into China Encourage China to invest in development of industrial timber plantations and streamline management of its existing old-growth forest Encourage consumers in US &amp; Europe to purchase only products made with verified legally produced timber Cooperate at the level of customs agencies to identify and impound shipments of illegal timber and timber products Slide 8 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union China - imports of timber products (2005) (By country, by product) Slide 9 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union What is the problem? CountryPercent of total production Cambodia90% Bolivia80% Peru80% Indonesia70-80% Ecuador70% Gabon70% PNG70% Ghana60% Cameroon50% Indicative Estimates of Illegal Logging Selected Countries CountryPercent of total production Myanmar50% Russia (Far east)50% Laos45% Colombia42% Thailand40% Brazil20-47% MalaysiaUp to 35 Vietnam20-40% Russia (Northwest)10-15% Sources: Savcor Indufor Oy (2004); FAO (2005); European Forest Institute (2005) Slide 10 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union IUCNs priorities for action Raise awareness of, and commitment to, FLEG among NGOs, communities and other stakeholders Strengthen civil society input to official FLEG processes Contribute to the development of tripartite national action plans on FLEG Pilot test innovative governance approaches in the field Provide information, tools and training to key actors who have a role to play in implementing FLEG reforms Address legal, economic and institutional constraints to implementation Identify and responds to the specific constraints that governments face in implementing cross border control of illegally logged timber Proactively capture and share lessons learned Slide 11 27 April, 2007The World Conservation Union Thank You IUCN Photo Library IUCN / Jeffrey McNeely </p>

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