Whole-Systems Framework for Sustainable Consumption Framework for Sustainable Consumption and Production ... consumption-production models by describing the linked ... Production, Consumption, Waste Cycle

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  • Environmental Project No. 807 2003Miljprojekt

    Whole-Systems Framework forSustainable Consumption andProduction

    Beatrice Anarow, Catherine Greener, Vinay Gupta,Michael Kinsley, Joanie Henderson, Chris Page and Kate ParrotRocky Mountain Institute

  • The Danish Environmental Protection Agency will, when opportunity

    offers, publish reports and contributions relating to environmentalresearch and development projects financed via the Danish EPA.

    Please note that publication does not signify that the contents of the

    reports necessarily reflect the views of the Danish EPA.

    The reports are, however, published because the Danish EPA finds that

    the studies represent a valuable contribution to the debate on

    environmental policy in Denmark.

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    Contents

    1 A FRAMEWORK FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OFSUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION 5

    1.1 THE CALL FOR A FRAMEWORK OF PROGRAMS 51.2 THE CALL FOR BETTER MODELS 5

    2 A WHOLE-SYSTEMS APPROACH TO SUSTAINABLEPRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION 7

    2.1 REFRAMING PRODUCTION-CONSUMPTION MODELS: THEINVESTMENT, PRODUCTION, CONSUMPTION, WASTE CYCLE 72.2 CYCLES WITHIN THE IPCW SYSTEM 9

    2.2.1 The Production and Consumption Cycle 92.2.2 The Investment Cycle 92.2.3 The Waste/By-product Cycle 9

    2.3 WHOLE-SYSTEMS THINKING 102.3.1 The Whole-systems Approach 102.3.2 Green Buildings 112.3.3 Integrated Pest Management 11

    3 PROGRAMS THAT SUPPORT WHOLE-SYSTEMSAPPROACHES TO SUSTAINABILITY 13

    3.1 PROGRAM ONE: INCORPORATE SYSTEMS THINKING INTO UNPROGRAM DESIGN AND DELIVERY 13

    3.1.1 Objectives 133.1.2 Background 133.1.3 Anticipated Outcomes 143.1.4 Program Activities 14

    3.2 PROGRAM TWO: SUPPORT THE WIDESPREAD USE OF INTEGRATEDECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING TOOLS. 15

    3.2.1 Objectives 153.2.2 Background 153.2.3 Anticipated Outcomes 173.2.4 Program Activities 17

    3.3 PROGRAM THREE: REFINE, STANDARDIZE, AND CONSISTENTLYAPPLY SUSTAINABILITY METRICS TO PROGRAMMATIC INTERVENTIONS18

    3.3.1 Objectives 183.3.2 Background 183.3.3 Anticipated Outcomes 203.3.4 Program Activities 20

    3.4 PROGRAM FOUR: CREATE AWARENESS OF SUSTAINABLEINVESTMENT PRACTICES AS THE NECESSARY COMPLEMENT OFSUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION PRACTICES. 21

    3.4.1 Objectives 213.4.2 Background 213.4.3 Anticipated Outcomes 213.4.4 Program Activities 21

    4 PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE GREEN DESIGN ANDINFRASTRUCTURE 23

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    4.1 PROGRAM FIVE: BUILD THE GLOBAL CAPACITY OF ONLINERESOURCES IN GREEN DESIGN 23

    4.1.1 Objectives 234.1.2 Background 234.1.3 Anticipated Outcomes 244.1.4 Activities 24

    4.2 PROGRAM SIX: GREEN DESIGNS AND RETROFITS FOR UNBUILDINGS 25

    4.2.1 Objectives 254.2.2 Background 254.2.3 Anticipated Outcomes 264.2.4 Program Activities 27

    4.3 PROGRAM SEVEN: ENCOURAGE ADOPTION OF DECENTRALIZEDINFRASTRUCTURE 28

    4.3.1 Objective 284.3.2 Background 284.3.3 Activities 29

    5 REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 31

    5.1 PROGRAM EIGHT: ESTABLISH A COALITION OF DEVELOPED ANDDEVELOPING ISLAND NATION-STATES TO FOSTER ENERGYINDEPENDENCE AND INCUBATION OF PIONEER HYDROGEN ECONOMIES.31

    5.1.1 Objectives 315.1.2 Background 315.1.3 Anticipated Outcomes 325.1.4 Program Activities 32

    5.2 PROGRAM NINE: "LEAPFROG" NEW ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONSPAST OUTDATED COMMAND AND CONTROL MODELS TO INTEGRATED,FLEXIBLE ONES. 33

    5.2.1 Objectives: 335.2.2 Background 345.2.3 Anticipated Outcomes: 355.2.4 Program Activities: 35

    5.3 PROGRAM TEN: DEVELOP INITIATIVES IN CHINA TO ASSIST INDEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISES AND THE TRAINING OFSUSTAINABILITY LEADERS. 35

    5.3.1 Objectives 355.3.2 Background 355.3.3 Anticipated Outcomes 385.3.4 Activities 38

    6 CONCLUSION 41

    7 ENDNOTES 43

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    1 A Framework for theImplementation of SustainableConsumption and Production

    1.1 The Call for a Framework of Programs

    The 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Developments Plan ofImplementation recorded its delegates recommended actions for achievingglobal sustainable development. Chapter three of the Plan calls for a shiftaway from patterns of unsustainable consumption and production and for thecreation of a ten-year framework of programs to bring the requested actionsinto fruition.

    The UN, individual governments, and the private sector have environmentalinitiatives of almost every imaginable type and form: educational,technological, monitoring, financial, development-based, production-focusedand more. Yet the World Summit on Sustainable Developmenti and theUNEP DTIE Global Status 2002: Sustainable Consumptionii concur: thecombined effect of these programs has fallen short of achieving our goal ofglobal sustainability.

    1.2 The Call for Better Models

    New models and methodologies that integrate sustainable consumption andproduction are key to successful sustainability efforts. The Way Forwardsection of UNEPs Global Status 2002: Cleaner Production prioritizes theintegration of cleaner production and sustainable consumption efforts in itslist of elements to facilitate greater implementation of Cleaner Production. iii

    The report lists three necessary steps to achieving this integration, notably,the development of methodologies which help in simultaneously addressingthe issues related to Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption. iv

    The corollary UNEP report, Global Status 2002: Sustainable Consumption,elaborates. The report identifies modeling as one of six strategic areas thatneed development in future sustainable consumption efforts. Strategic AreaThree calls for:

    Finding a more appropriate conceptual schema for describing theessential elements of systems of production and consumption, allowingfor more complexity of elements and interactions than the two-sidedconsumption and production, but still simple enough to assist analysisand intervention.v

    This paper proposes a whole-systems model that expands on conventionalconsumption-production models by describing the linked cycles ofunsustainable investment, production, consumption, and waste. Whole-

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    systems models are more complete and are therefore better situated toidentify coordinated networks of strategic interventions in an effort to movebeyond interventions that only affect one part of a system. This paper willthen recommend programmatic responses based on the work the RockyMountain Institute has developed in the areas of whole-systems thinking,Natural Capitalism , manufacturing efficiency, and alternative energy andenergy systems. Our programs are organized into three groups: SystemsThinking, Green Design, and Regional Development.

    The Four Principles of Natural Capitalism

    1) Radically Increase Resource Productivity.2) Shift to biologically inspired production models (Biomimicry).3) Move to a solutions-based business model.4) Reinvest in natural and human capital.

    -From Natural Capitalism

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    2 A Whole-Systems Approach toSustainable Production andConsumption

    2.1 Reframing Production-Consumption Models: The Investment,Production, Consumption, Waste Cycle

    Success in the global efforts to shift towards sustainable consumption andproduction depends on an accurate and comprehensive model of the systemsof consumption and production. Starting with such a model, it becomespossible to study the complete life cycle of a particular environmentalproblem; to discover where in the life cycle effective interventions can bemade; and to produce metrics to measure the effectiveness of interventions.

    The Investment, Production, Consumption, Waste (IPCW) cycle that thispaper proposes (see diagram) is a more complete situation model thanconventional production-consumption models.

    The IPCW cycle shows that:

    1> Investment uses financial and natural capital to create productioncapacity.

    2> Production makes goods (and often waste) using additionalfinancial and natural capital (operating costs and raw materials, forexample).

    3> Consumption takes goods and turns them into profits and(usually) waste.

    4> Waste remains.

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    Fig. 1: IPCW Diagram

    Diagram Key Natural Capital represents natural resources, such as coal and oil,

    living systems and ecosystem services.vi

    Financial Capital is cash, investments, and monetary instruments.vii Inthis diagram it also represents those who manage and control theseresources.

    Human and Physical Capital are vital parts of the model developed inNatural Capitalism.viii They have been de-emphasized in this diagramfor clarity.

    Production represents all of the infrastructure and systems thatprovide goods and services.

    Consumption is an abstraction that represents all market demand,including that of individuals, companies, and governments.Consumption also is the process of satisfying that demand byconsuming goods and services.

    By-products are outputs of a system that could have been waste, butcan be reused, usually instead of extracting further natural resources.

    Waste includes inefficient processes, residue, pollutants, and outputsfrom production that have no other further use in the IPCW cycle(terminal waste). It also includes resource depletion through over-consumption, such as the degradation of farmland through pooragriculture.

    Arrows represent the flow of resources, in various forms (money,goods, natural resources, waste) between these six nodes.

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    2.2 Cycles within the IPCW System

    The IPCW system is complex. Highlighting three sub-cycles in the systemmakes it easier to understand.

    2.2.1 The Production and Consumption Cycle

    Current sustainable production and sustainable consumption programs targetthe production and consumption cycle. As consumers purchase goods andservices

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