w04 carved in stone

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W04 carved in stone

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  • 1. Brenda Hoddinott W-04 Advanced: Studio Diary Series The drawing of a stone dragon featured in this diary, demonstrates the process of rendering high contrast shading with squirkling and stippling, so as to create the textures and patterns of highly polished smooth stone, jagged stone, and glass. You can choose from various approaches to exploring the creative and technical processes of rendering this drawing, including: Printing this lesson, curling up in your favorite comfy chair, and closely examining the thirty-six illustrations as you read. Rendering a drawing of this sculpture by following along with the text and illustrations. Using this lesson as a guideline while drawing a stone object of your choice, or a similar subject from a photograph, life, or your imagination. I get my sketch off to a great start by first setting up the lighting and composition, and then sketching accurate proportions. From there a detailed outline of the sculpture allows me to plan my shading approach. To protect my drawing from accidental smudging, and maintain the crisp edges of the high contrast shading, I work from the upper section of the drawing downward to the cast shadow. 16 PAGES 36 ILLUSTRATIONS Recommended for artists with advanced drawing skills, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada 2005

2. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 2 - If your goal with this lesson is to simply explore the creative and technical processes of my drawing rather than draw, simply print this lesson, curl up in your favorite comfy chair, and closely examine the thirty-six illustrations as you read. On the other hand, you may prefer to render a drawing of this sculpture by following along with the text and illustrations. Or you can use this lesson as a guideline while drawing a stone object of your choice or a similar subject from life. If you are drawing from your own subject, choose something that appeals to you. Otherwise you may get bored halfway through. If youre a beginner, choose a subject that you feel is very, very simple. You set yourself up for a frustrating experience by taking on a project beyond your skill level. Set up your subject and plan your drawing before you begin. Rotate the object until you find an angle that pleases you and take the time to set up suitable lighting. Then plan your drawing format. Choose an approximate size. Decide if your completed drawing should be horizontal or vertical, and whether a rectangular, square, oval, circular or another shaped format is more appropriate for your subject. The subject of my drawing is an original sculpture made for me as a gift by my friend Jesse Wilts. Unfortunately, the actual sculpture cannot be included with this lesson! So, I took a couple of photos to give you an idea of what it looks like. Always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw. Each time you work on a new section, remember to move your paper so its always under your hand. This prevents you from smudging your drawing, and protects the paper from the oils in your skin. 3. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 3 - Setting up accurate proportions is a great way to make sure my drawing is off to a great start! As I sketch with an HB pencil, only the weight of the pencil itself creates the very faint lines. The lines in the next few illustrations seem dark; however, in reality the lines are so light that I can barely see them. I have made them darker in a computer program so you can see them. 4. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 4 - Dont press too hard with your pencils! No matter how careful you are, accidents do happen and you may need to erase a section. I prefer using mechanical pencils to avoid having to constantly sharpen my pencils. On the other hand, when I do draw with regular pencils, I keep the points very sharp with a sandpaper block. I visually measure the proportions of my sketch, while constantly comparing them to the sculpture. Confirm that spaces and perspective elements are drawn correctly. Check the relationships of the various parts to one another, observe that angles, sizes, and proportions are accurate, and adjust as needed. Pay close attention to the shapes of the negative and positive spaces. 5. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 5 - The head of the dragon is drawn as it was created. First I outline the form of the stone and then slowly cut away sections. The edges of the forms of this sculpture are neither parallel nor perpendicular to one another. However, having a firm grasp of the rules of perspective is a tremendous help with rendering many aspects of this drawing. To learn some of the basic elements of perspective, refer to lessons A- 14: Perspective Basics, B-26: One Point Perspective and C-27: Above, On and Below the Horizon Line. 6. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 6 - I sketch the final details, including the fingers and toes. At this point, my initial sketch is almost complete. I check my proportions carefully by comparing my drawing to the actual sculpture and fix problem areas. I use my kneaded eraser to gently pat my entire sketch until the lines are so light that I can barely see them. With a freshly sharpened HB pencil, I lightly outline the entire drawing and add additional details. As I draw, I constantly study the sculpture in search of intricate details that will enhance the accuracy of my drawing. Draw slowly. Accuracy is more important than speed. Your speed automatically improves with practice. After patting the outline with my kneaded eraser, my drawing is ready for shading. The light source is from the upper left; hence, the overall shading on the left will be lighter than on the right. However, additional very dark shadows are visible in the carved out crevices, such as the eye and nostrils. 7. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 7 - I use various grades of pencils from 2H (for the lightest values), to 6B (for the darkest shadow sections). The high contrast shading technique I use for the stone texture of this sculpture, combines squirkling with stippling. Squirkling is an easy method of shading, in which randomly drawn curved lines, squiggles, scribbles, and squirkles are combined with circular shapes to create textured values. Stippling (sometimes referred to as pointillism) is a shading method in which various dots are used to create values. High contrast shading is created by drawing very dark values beside the highlights and light values. As you can see in this close up, the high shine of the polished stone in the upper sections of this sculpture, is achieved by utilizing high contrast values rendered with squirkling and stippling. 8. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 8 - I add a few dark spots with a 2B pencil (in the light sections) and a 6B (in the shadow sections) to accentuate the intricate patterns within the stone. The eye and nostrils are cut into the stone and therefore in shadow (shaded with a 6B pencil). To maintain a realistic representation of the sculpture, I vary the thicknesses and values of the lines that outline the edges of the forms. 9. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail: bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site: http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com - 9 - As my shading extends downward to the shoulders and arms, I become increasingly aware of the sharp contrast between the light values on the left as compared to the extreme darks on