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  • 149

    The Reading Teacher Vol. 66 Issue 2 pp. 149–151 DOI:10.1002/TRTR.01114 © 2012 International Reading Association R T

    Toolbox Using Comic Strips as a Book Report Alternative Adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans “Book Report Alternative: Examining Story Elements Using Story

    Map Comic Strips” by Lisa Storm Fink and “Buzz! Whiz! Bang! Using Comic Books to Teach Onomatopoeia” by Maureen Gerard

    Students use a six-paneled comic strip to summarize a story. This activity allows for multiple interpretations and enhances comprehension by drawing attention to story elements.

    Instructions Begin by reading a short story. Discuss the story’s elements. Create a class elements chart with a column for setting, character, problem, event, and solution. Write down student responses that relate to each element. Allow the students to explore Comic Creator Student Interactive on ReadWriteThink.org : www .readwritethink.org/classroom- resources/student-interactives/ comic-creator-30021.html

    Distribute the story elements comic strip planning sheet. Work with the students to fill out the planning sheet using the data gathered on the class elements

    chart. Once the chart is complete, students refer to the planning sheet information while creating a six-frame story map on Comic Creator. Type the title of the story as the comic title. Allow students to create personal subtitles based on their understanding of the story. Designate the first frame of the six-frame strip as the title frame. Each of the remaining five frames will highlight a specific story element. Students may add backgrounds, characters, and dialogue to represent each story element. Print the black and white strips and allow the students to color them for sharing and display. Completed comic strips should be evaluated for clarity of student understanding of story elements.

    Add a little “Zing!” to the dialogue by asking students to include onomatopoeias. Read a few comics to the students, asking them to identify the words that imitate sounds such as whiz, bang, boom. Discuss the use of onomatopoeia.

    Brainstorm and write possible words that would be appropriate to use in a summary of the story you just finished. Encourage students to use onomatopoeia in their comic strips. The Comic Strip Rubric (see reproducible) may be used for self- evaluation, peer evaluation, or grading.

    In a follow-up lesson, allow the students to complete a Comic Strip Planning Sheet (see reproducible) and six-frame comic for a book they read independently.

    Extensions Comic strips are great to share with parents, younger students, and peers. Use the students’ comic strips to create mini Readers Theatre presentations. Assign parts, allow the students to rehearse, and allow the students to present the comic strip to the whole class. Comic strips may be posted on a bulletin board, gathered for a comic book convention at which students read each other’s comics.

    (continued)

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  • 150

    Using Comic Strips as a Book Report Alternative Adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans “Book Report Alternative: Examining Story Elements Using Story

    Map Comic Strips” by Lisa Storm Fink and “Buzz! Whiz! Bang! Using Comic Books to Teach Onomatopoeia” by Maureen Gerard

    The Reading Teacher Vol. 66 Issue 2 October 2012R T

    Toolbox Reproducible

    Reprinted from ReadWriteThink.org. May be copied for classroom use.

    TRTR_1114.indd 150TRTR_1114.indd 150 9/13/2012 4:26:50 PM9/13/2012 4:26:50 PM

  • 151

    Using Comic Strips as a Book Report Alternative Adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans “Book Report Alternative: Examining Story Elements Using Story

    Map Comic Strips” by Lisa Storm Fink and “Buzz! Whiz! Bang! Using Comic Books to Teach Onomatopoeia” by Maureen Gerard

    www.reading.org R T

    Using Comic Strips as a Book Report Alternative Adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans “Book Report Alternative: Examining Story Elements Using Story

    Map Comic Strips” by Lisa Storm Fink and “Buzz! Whiz! Bang! Using Comic Books to Teach Onomatopoeia” by Maureen Gerard

    www.reading.org R T

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