timesaving tools teaching transparencies tools • interactive ... interactive lesson...

Download Timesaving Tools TEACHING TRANSPARENCIES  Tools • Interactive ... Interactive Lesson PlannerPlanning has never been easier! ... The First Conquistador (ISBN 1–56501–669–6)

If you can't read please download the document

Post on 10-May-2018

217 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • 404A

    Chapter 13 ResourcesTimesaving Tools

    Interactive Teacher Edition Access your Teacher Wraparound Edition andyour classroom resources with a few easy clicks.

    Interactive Lesson Planner Planning has never been easier! Organize yourweek, month, semester, or year with all the lesson helps you need to maketeaching creative, timely, and relevant.

    Use GlencoesPresentation Plus!multimedia teacher tool to easily present

    dynamic lessons that visually excite your stu-dents. Using Microsoft PowerPoint you can customize the presentations to create your ownpersonalized lessons.

    The following videotape programs are available from Glencoe as supplements to Chapter 13:

    Christopher Columbus: Explorer of the NewWorld (ISBN 156501667X)

    Ponce de Leon: The First Conquistador (ISBN 1565016696)

    To order, call Glencoe at 18003347344. To findclassroom resources to accompany many of thesevideos, check the following home pages:A&E Television: www.aande.comThe History Channel: www.historychannel.com

    R

    R

    TEACHING TRANSPARENCIESTEACHING TRANSPARENCIESChapter Transparency 13 L2

    Graphic Organizer StudentActivity 13 Transparency L2

    CHAPTER TRANSPARENCY 13

    Spanish Imports of Gold and Silver From the Americas, 15031660

    Mill

    ions

    of

    Pou

    nds

    Years

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    9

    10

    11

    15

    03

    1

    52

    0

    15

    21

    1

    54

    0

    15

    41

    1

    56

    0

    15

    61

    1

    58

    0

    15

    81

    1

    60

    0

    16

    01

    1

    62

    0

    16

    21

    1

    64

    0

    16

    41

    1

    66

    0

    The Age of Exploration (15001800)What I Know What I Wantto Find Out What I Learned

    How Can ILearn More

    Graphic Organizer 2:K-W-L-H Chart

    Map OverlayTransparency 13 L2

    Triangular Trade Routes, 1730

    NORTHAMERICA

    SOUTHAMERICA

    AFRICA

    EUROPE

    30 N

    0

    15 N

    Caribbean Sea

    45 W60 W 30 W75 W90 W

    45 N

    15 W 0 15 E

    ATLANTIC OCEAN

    105 W

    GREAT BRITAIN

    BRITISHCOLONIES

    WESTINDIES

    N

    E

    S

    W

    1,0000

    0 1,000

    2,000 mi.

    2,000 km

    TRADE ROUTESGreat BritainColoniesEurope

    Manufactured goods

    Dried fish,whale oil, lumber, tobacco, wheat

    oliv

    eoi

    l,fr

    uit

    Win

    e,

    Map Overlay Transparency 13

    Enrichment Activity 13 L3

    Cop

    yrig

    ht

    by

    The

    McG

    raw

    -Hill

    Com

    pani

    es, I

    nc.

    Name Date Class

    As European explorers made discoverieson their ocean voyages, many writers beganto consider the proper way to relate to newpeople and different ways of life. A lawyerby profession, Michel Montaigne(15331592) retired to his estate in the

    Enrichment Activity 13

    Bordeaux region of France in 1571 to writea collection of essays that was first pub-lished in 1580. In his Essais, Montaignegives his personal opinion on a range ofissues of the day. Read the followingexcepts from his essay On Cannibals.

    The European View of the Americas

    DIRECTIONS: Answer the questions below in the space provided.

    1. Why does Montaigne hesitate to guess whether there are additional new countries to bediscovered?_____________________________________________________________________

    2. How might Montaignes observation that our eyes are bigger than our stomachs berelated to the European conquest of the Americas? __________________________________

    3. How does Montaigne characterize the people who live in the Americas? _______________

    4. In what does Montaigne find fault with the way Europeans perceive their own socialcustoms? _______________________________________________________________________

    5. Ethnocentrism is the attitude that ones own ethnic group, culture, or nation is superiorto all others. It is the belief that one has the best religion, the best political system, andthe most accomplished way of doing things. How far have people come sinceMontaignes time in acknowledging and exploring other peoples differences as poten-tially equal or superior to their own? ______________________________________________

    I had with me for a long time a man who had lived ten or twelve years in that other world whichhas been discovered in our time, in the place where Villegaignon landed [Brazil], and which hecalled Antarctic France. This discovery of so vast a country seems to me worth reflecting on. Ishould not care to pledge myself that another may not be discovered in the future, since so manygreater men than we have been wrong about this one. I am afraid that our eyes are bigger thanour stomachs, and that we have more curiosity than understanding. We grasp at everything, butcatch nothing except wind. . . .

    I do not believe, from what I have been told about this people, that there is anything barbarous orsavage about them, except that we call barbarous anything that is contrary to our own habits. Indeed weseem to have no other criterion of truth and reason than the type and kind of opinions and customscurrent in the land where we live. There we always see the perfect religion, the perfect political system,the perfect and most accomplished way of doing everything.

    Primary Source Reading 13 L2

    Name Date Class

    Cop

    yrig

    ht

    by

    The

    McG

    raw

    -Hill

    Com

    pani

    es, I

    nc.

    A Letter by Christopher Columbus

    As you know, Christopher Columbus was trying to reach China whenhe discovered America and the islands of the Caribbean. OnFebruary 13, 1493, he wrote a letter to Santangel, the Spanish gov-ernment official who had persuaded Queen Isabella to finance his expedition.Below is part of Columbuss letter, followed by an interpretation by modernhistorian Daniel J. Boorstin.

    Guided Reading In this selection, read to learn Columbuss account of the voyage and compare it toBoorstins interpretation.

    When I reached Juana [Cuba], I followed itscoast to the westward, and found it so large thatI thought it must be the mainland,the provinceof Cathay [China]; and, as I found neither townsnor villages on the seacoast, but only a few ham-lets, with the inhabitants of which I could nothold conversation because they all immediatelyfled, I kept on the same route. . . .

    . . . The lands are high and there are manyvery lofty mountains. . . . [The islands] are allmost beautiful, of a thousand different shapes,accessible, and covered with trees of a thousandkinds of such great height that they seemed toreach the skies. . . . The nightingale was singingas well as other birds of a thousand differentkinds; and that, in November, the month in whichI myself was roaming amongst them. There arepalm-trees of six or eight kinds, wonderful intheir beautiful variety; but this is the case withall the other trees and fruits and grasses; trees,plants, or fruits filled us with admiration. It con-tains extraordinary pine groves, and very exten-sive plains. There is also honey, a great variety ofbirds, and many different kinds of fruits. In theinterior there are many mines of metals and apopulation innumerable. . . . The inhabitants ofthis and of all the other islands I have found orgained intelligence of, both men and women, go

    as naked as they were born. . . . They have nei-ther iron, nor steel, nor arms, nor are they com-petent to use them, not that they are not well-formed and of handsome stature, but becausethey are timid to a surprising degree.

    On my reaching the Indies, I took by force,in the first island that I discovered, some of thesenatives that they might learn our language andgive me information in regard to what existed inthese parts; and it so happened that they soonunderstood us and we them, either by words or signs, and they have been very serviceable tous. . . . I find that they . . . believe that I comefrom heaven. . . .

    They assure me that there is another island. . . in which the inhabitants have no hair. It isextremely rich in gold. . . . Finally, and speakingonly of what has taken place in this voyage . . .their Highnesses may see that I shall give themall the gold they require, if they will give me buta little assistance; spices also, and cotton, asmuch as their Highnesses shall command to beshipped; and mastic [resin used in varnishes],hitherto found only in Greece . . . slaves, asmany of these idolators as their Highnesses shallcommand to be shipped. I think also I havefound rhubarb and cinnamon, and shall find athousand other valuable things.

    Boorstins Interpretation

    On shipboard off the Azores in mid-February 1493, returning from his first voyage,Columbus wrote his own report of what hethought, and wanted others to think, that he hadaccomplished. . . .

    Columbus, having convinced himself that atrip across the Western Ocean would take him to

    the Indies, now set about convincing a wideraudience. He had a heavy vested interest in hisdestination actually being the Indies. . . .Columbus was careful not to mention disastersor near disastersthe loss of the flagship, SantaMaria, the insubordination of Martn AlonsoPinzn, the commander of the Pinta, or the muti-

    P R I M A R Y S O U R C E R E A D I N G 13

    APPLICATION AND ENRICHMENTAPPLICATION AND ENRICHMENTHistory SimulationActivity 13 L1

    Game Card 5You have encountered an unchartedplanet much like Earth, with manyresources. The inhabitants are friendlyand invite you to stay. You may be able

    to set up a trading station on the planet.Stay

    Your voyage is over. 5,000 points Continue

    15,000 points

    Game Card 6Food is running

Recommended

View more >