teaching what you know and knowing what you teach_by ajs

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  1. 1. Teaching What You Know And Knowing What You Teach: A Recipe For Relevance An SBBC Faculty In-Service Event Facilitator: A.J. Schuermann Santa Barbara Campus January 22, 2016
  2. 2. Why are we here at this In Service?
  3. 3. Why are we here at this In Service? In-service education has as its major goal the updating of teachers in (1) subject matter, (2) curriculum concepts, (3) new theories and techniques of instruction, and (4) new educational media.
  4. 4. Recap of recent SBBC In Services for new and returning instructors
  5. 5. Recap of recent SBBC In Services for new and returning instructors 2013: Four Elements 4 the Future 2014: Millennial Challenge 2014: Creating a New Online Experience on the Ground 2015: Turn It App a Notch
  6. 6. Todays In Service Today we introduce some new theories and techniques of instruction. Im using source materials and ideas contained in two books worth reading: Teach What You Know by Steve Trautman and Teaching What You Don't Know by Therese Huston
  7. 7. Thats partly how I came up with the title Teaching What You Know And Knowing What You Teach: A Recipe For Relevance
  8. 8. Describes the need for successful transfer of knowledge through mentoring in the workplace, and how to do so. Describes different types of learning styles other than what we are accustomed to recognizing and how to reach them all. Teach What You Know
  9. 9. Describes how faculty members traditionally expect to be able to teach courses in their areas of expertise. Describes the gap between teaching as an expert of course content and teaching as a novice of it. Teaching What You Dont Know
  10. 10. Learning Styles from the Real World
  11. 11. The Why? Learners The What? Learners The How Does It Work? Learners The What If? Learners Learning Styles from the Real World
  12. 12. Lets say you have to explain to a group how to build a bridge Building the Bridge
  13. 13. Building the Bridge 1. Why? Learners
  14. 14. Why are we building a bridge? Why are you teaching me how to build a bridge right now? Why are we doing it before we work on the road? Building the Bridge 1. Why? Learners
  15. 15. All of these come down to the biggest question theyre really getting at: Why do I care? Some learners simply cannot learn effectively before they get over this hurdle. When youre teaching them, part of their brain is asking these questions and demanding an answer before allowing learning to proceed. Building the Bridge 1. Why? Learners
  16. 16. Give a reason for the demonstration Demonstrate again and explain the logic behind each step. Logic means why we do it and the consequences of not doing it. Building the Bridge 1. Why? Learners
  17. 17. Explain the relationship to the job, which gives you an opportunity to tell your apprentice how often he will use the skill and how important it is before teaching it. Building the Bridge 1. Why? Learners
  18. 18. Building the Bridge 2. What? Learners
  19. 19. What kind of a bridge is it? Is there anything I can read to be prepared? Where is it located? What is the plan? Building the Bridge 2. What? Learners
  20. 20. All of these come down to the biggest question theyre really getting at: What do I need to know? What? learners just want the facts without a lot of fluff. Give them the information in the cleanest language possible for the best results. Building the Bridge 2. What? Learners
  21. 21. They need documentation or, at least, an outline or an agenda. They really like step-by-step processes. What? learners dont do well if youre winging it or talking without a plan. They really appreciate being taught by people who are prepared and focused. Building the Bridge 2. What? Learners
  22. 22. Building the Bridge 3. How does it work? Learners
  23. 23. Is it like the bridge we built last time? Is it going to be part of the State or National Highway system? Are we replacing or rebuilding an existing structure? Building the Bridge 3. How does it work? Learners
  24. 24. How Does It Work? learners need to see the relationships between what theyre learning and the big picture. They need to see the context relative to the workflow. They need to get their hands dirty and practice the skills and ideas. Building the Bridge 3. How does it work? Learners
  25. 25. For them, the information doesnt line up in neat rows, it comes in connections to ideas and skills they already understand. Building the Bridge 3. How does it work? Learners
  26. 26. Identify practice opportunities, remind peer mentors that these learners need plenty of opportunity to experience the tools or processes first hand. They often have trouble learning without hands-on practices. Building the Bridge 3. How does it work? Learners
  27. 27. Building the Bridge 4. What if? Learners
  28. 28. What if we built a ferry boat? Have you considered how much faster and cheaper a boat would be? What if we put two boats on line? Then wed have double the capacity. Building the Bridge 4. What if? Learners
  29. 29. What If? learners learn by testing your ideas while youre teaching. Leave room for them to discuss some of the options you considered. They want to know if youve tried any of the ideas they might have come up with, and then, if you have, what happened. Building the Bridge 4. What if? Learners
  30. 30. Each question is about understanding the boundaries and the options that were considered in shaping the information presented. The questions dont often sound like that to the peer mentor who hears them. Instead, they can sound judgmental, arrogant, and completely off-topic. Building the Bridge 4. What if? Learners
  31. 31. You can round yourself out as a teacher, so you accommodate all learning styles all the time. All types of learners benefit from each type of information described. If you provide that information, you wont be wasting time. Itll just mean that no matter whom youre teaching, youll have a much better shot at hitting the mark. Building the Bridge
  32. 32. Teaching What You Dont Know
  33. 33. Teaching What You Dont Know Huston's book describes ways that content novices have an advantage in helping students learn.
  34. 34. Novices have a more realistic assessment of the time it will take a learner to complete a task. Experts often assign more work than the learner can complete in the time allotted. Teaching What You Dont Know
  35. 35. Huston cites one study that demonstrated the estimations made by experts about the time a new learner needed to complete a task were not only much less reliable than the estimations of a novicethey were actually "worse than those of someone who has never performed the task at all." Teaching What You Dont Know
  36. 36. "People with little experience," Huston writes, "are also better than experts at predicting how many steps another person will need to complete a task on her first attempt. They can better envision the steps that a beginner will take, what kinds of mistakes she'll make, and which steps she might have to repeat." Teaching What You Dont Know
  37. 37. "A content novice is also more likely than a content expert to relate difficult concepts to everyday, common knowledgeto something the student already knows simply because the instructor doesn't have a vault of specialized knowledge on the topic from which to draw." Teaching What You Dont Know
  38. 38. The underlying assumption for many of us is that good teaching involves finding an effective way to structure and communicate complex information." Teaching What You Dont Know
  39. 39. When you teach as a content novice, you become much more aware of the limitations of thinking about teaching as covering content. Teaching What You Dont Know
  40. 40. You come to realize that just because you are covering it doesn't mean they are learning it. Teaching What You Dont Know
  41. 41. Teaching as a content novice, you are more likely to set realistic expectations for learners, to notice when they are breaking down and experiencing problems, and to pause and make adjustments in responseinstead of marching dutifully from one end of the syllabus to the other, covering everything on your ambitious agenda. Teaching What You Dont Know
  42. 42. Teaching as a content novice, you are more likely to set realistic expectations for learners, to notice when they are breaking down and experiencing problems, and to pause and make adjustments in responseinstead of marching dutifully from one end of the syllabus to the other, covering everything on your ambitious agenda. Teaching What You Dont Know