teaching using informational texts (close reading)

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Teaching Using Informational Texts (Close Reading). Martinsville School District November 8, 2013 Linda Reven lmreven@eiu.edu Denise E. Reid dereid@eiu.edu Eastern Illinois University dereid@eiu.edu. Why is Reading Informational Text Important?. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Teaching Using Informational Texts (Close Reading)

Teaching Using Informational Texts(Close Reading)Martinsville School DistrictNovember 8, 2013

Linda Reven lmreven@eiu.eduDenise E. Reid dereid@eiu.edu Eastern Illinois Universitydereid@eiu.edu

Why is Reading Informational Text Important?Findings in the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress confirm the need for more informational text reading:

34% of fourth graders were at or above the proficient level in science.30% of eighth graders were at or above the proficient level in science.21% of twelfth graders were at or above the proficient level in science.

CCSSCommon Core State StandardsAnchor Standard 10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

GradeExpectations for Informational TextsKActively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.1With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade 1.2By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.3By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently.4By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high at the high end of the range.5By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.CCSSCommon Core State StandardsAnchor Standard 10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

GradeExpectations for Informational Texts6By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.7By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

8By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.9-10By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.11-12By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.CCSSCommon Core State StandardsAnchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions from the text.

GradeExpectations for Informational TextsKWith prompting and support ask and answer questions about key details in a text.1Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.2Ask and answer questions as who, what , where, when why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.3Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.4Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.5Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.CCSSCommon Core State StandardsAnchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions from the text.

GradeExpectations for Informational TextsKWith prompting and support ask and answer questions about key details in a text.1Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.2Ask and answer questions as who, what , where, when why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.3Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.4Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.5Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.CCSSCommon Core State StandardsAnchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions from the text.

GradeExpectations for Informational Texts6Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.7Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.8Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.9-10Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of wht the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.11-12Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.What is Close Reading?Close reading represents one type of classroom reading in which a small or large group of students have a go at a text. Students become the primary investigators of the text and its meaning. (Lapp, et al., pg. 110)

Purpose of Close Reading Complex Informational TextAssimilate new textual information with background knowledge/prior experiences to build new schema.Build habits of readers when they engage with a complex piece of text.Building stamina and persistence when confronted with complex texts.Fostering metacognition.Instructional Practices/Comprehension StrategiesInstructional PracticesInteractive read-alouds and shared readingsTeacher modeling and think-aloudsGuided reading with leveled textsCollaborative reading and discussionsIndependent reading and writingComprehension StrategiesQuestioning strategiesSummarizing strategiesInferencing strategiesSelf-monitoring strategiesConnection strategiesAnalysis strategiesThink-AloudsMake predictionsDescribe images (pictures)Give analogies (this is like)Be aware of potholes in readingUse fix-up strategiesUseful Strategies & ToolsQAR (Question-Answer-Relationship)In the Book (Right There Questions/Think & Search)In My Head (Author & Me/On My Own)Reciprocal TeachingSummarizer-Predictor-Clarifier-QuestionerGraphic Organizers (Word Map)Expectation Grid/BookmarksDouble Entry JournalHerringboneWiki sticks, sticky notes, book marks, foldables.Sentence Frames Ex. The author wrote this book to tell us that ____________.Story frames

(Raphael, Highfield & Au, 2006)15Picture - QAR (Cortese, 2003)This strategy provides a venue outside the printed text for practicing cognitive tasks that are critical to reading comprehension (p. 375).

This technique can reduce the cognitive linguistic burden on students by extricating processing demands from text (p. 376).

16Picture-QAR StrategyIn the BookRight There - students must note information that is depicted outright in a single illustration Think and Search - requires the students to draw conclusions from information depicted across several illustrationsIn my HeadAuthor (Artist) and You - the students prior knowledge base must be combined with information the author/illustrator providesOn My Own - the information is drawn exclusively from the students prior knowledge17

18P-QAR: In the BookSitting Ducks (Bedard, 1998)Right There

What is the setting in this picture?(factory)

What is the alligator doing?(punching the time clock)Think and Search

How does the ducks feelings about the waiter in the diner change? Why?(he is excited and then alarmed;the waiter is really an alligator with a duck puppet)

Why does the duck give the alligator a ticket?(he wants the alligator to go to Florida too)

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24P-QAR: In My HeadSitting Ducks (Bedard, 1998)Author/Artist and You

How do you think the duck feels when the waiter in the restaurant shows them the daily special? Why?(very uncomfortable, because the daily special is duck soup)

What do the ducks seem to be doing? Why?(exercising in order to get in shape to fly south)On Your Own

In this picture, the egg fell off the assembly line. Why do you think this happened?(many possible answers)

Why do you think the alligator put the duck in his lunch pail?(many possible answers)

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29Applying QARs to PicturesThis strategy involving visual literacy provides a means for:practicing the task demands that are associated with answering comprehension questions whileenhancing the students metacognitive awareness of the sources of information available to the reader relative to those questions.

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Text Complexity/Informational Text

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