SASH Conference The Ofsted perspective on Somerset secondary schools 15 May 2015 Tom Winskill, Senior HMI, Ofsted South West 15 May 2015

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  • Slide 1
  • SASH Conference The Ofsted perspective on Somerset secondary schools 15 May 2015 Tom Winskill, Senior HMI, Ofsted South West 15 May 2015
  • Slide 2
  • Contents Somerset secondary performance data compared with other local authorities in the South West What do Ofsted reports tell us Challenges for the Somerset Challenge Changes to inspection arrangements Questions
  • Slide 3
  • Somerset was one of the lowest performing LAs for GCSE passes at 5A*-C with EM in 2014 Proportion of pupils achieving 5 or more GCSEs, A*-C including English and mathematics, by LA (2014)
  • Slide 4
  • In all SW authorities except Bristol, KS4 attainment as nationally declined from 2013 to 2014. The decline in Somerset was greater than the regional average. Change in proportion of pupils achieving 5 or more GCSEs, A*-C including English and mathematics, by LA (2013 to 2014)
  • Slide 5
  • FSM eligible pupils attainment in Somerset is one of the lowest in the SW.
  • Slide 6
  • The percentage of FSM pupils making expected progress in mathematics from KS2-4 in Somerset was lower than in most SW authorities
  • Slide 7
  • The percentage of FSM pupils making expected progress in English from KS2-4 in Somerset was one of the lowest in the South West
  • Slide 8
  • Value added for both FSM and non-FSM pupils from KS2-4 in 2014 was lower in Somerset than in most SW authorities
  • Slide 9
  • Education South West Conference | 9 Value added scores for high attaining pupils in Somerset were below the national average and lower than in most SW authorities
  • Slide 10
  • The percentages of students gaining 3 A*-A grades and AAB at A level were lower than in most South West authorities
  • Slide 11
  • Changes in the gap between FSM performance at GCSE and performance of all pupils in Somerset secondary schools 2013 to 2014 A mixed picture: In 11 schools the gap closed. Notable changes include: -52 to -10; -40 to -23; -45 to -27. In 13 schools there was a wider gap in 2014 than in 2013. Notable changes include: -7 to -22; -22 to -45; -14 to -44; -21 to -35. In 2 schools the gap remained the same. Data not available for 2 schools
  • Slide 12
  • Somerset secondary schools inspection grades As of 31 March 2015: 5 outstanding; 24 good; 7 requires improvement and 1 inadequate (special measures) 78% good or better an improving picture Around one fifth of secondary age students do not attend a good or outstanding school Future of inspection | 12
  • Slide 13
  • What works in Somerset? In schools where the FSM/non-FSM gap is closing inspectors noted the following Teaching is improving as result of coaching, mentoring, professional challenge to staff particularly in relation to progress of disadvantaged pupils. (use of) support groups, extra lessons, homework club wide range of support measures in literacy and numeracy and raised levels of confidence and improved learning skills (for FSM pupils) effective support from learning mentors and improving teaching range of activities and extra provision specialists delivering high quality literacy and numeracy teaching
  • Slide 14
  • Challenges for all Somerset secondary schools Improve examination results for all Improve examination results for disadvantaged and more able pupils More consistent improvement across the authority Build on what works in successful and improving schools
  • Slide 15
  • Ofsted and Somerset secondary schools Letter to secondary heads re- FSM/non FSM performance gaps and subsequent closing the gap seminars in autumn 2014 Concerns expressed in the multi-remit inspection in autumn 2014 Seminars for middle leaders in July 2015 Possible use of s8 inspection to focus on schools arrangements for promoting the achievement of disadvantaged pupils Future of inspection | 15
  • Slide 16
  • Future of education inspection Changes to school inspections from September 2015
  • Slide 17
  • New Common Inspection Framework for schools, non-association independent schools, further education and skills providers and registered early years providers. under it four graded judgements across all remits. leadership and management; teaching, learning and assessment; personal development, behaviour and welfare; outcomes for children and learners. and greater emphasis on safeguarding and curriculum. will provide greater clarity, coherence and comparability for users, learners, parents and employers.
  • Slide 18
  • Short inspections for good providers Frequent, shorter inspections for good schools, academies and further education and skills providers approximately every three years. More proportionate: the right sort of inspections at the right time. Designed to check if the quality of provision is being sustained, and leaders have the capacity to drive improvement. Help support rising standards with greater professional dialogue. Regular reporting to parents, carers, learners and employers. Identify decline early and give schools and providers opportunity to demonstrate improvement sooner.
  • Slide 19
  • Changes to the way we work To prepare for September, we are: making significant changes in how we source, train, contract and manage all inspectors who deliver schools and FES inspections. tightening up selection criteria that all inspectors have to meet developing structures for closer working relationships between: contracted Ofsted Inspectors (OI) Her Majestys Inspectors (HMI) Senior HMI to share knowledge and experience of inspections.
  • Slide 20
  • Commitment to quality and consistency From September, we will : expect a higher standard of inspections and consistency among inspectors when making judgements place more emphasis on directly providing high-quality ongoing training, mentoring and development for all inspectors quickly and fairly address underperformance, putting in place training where needed or terminating contracts where performance does not improve invest significant time to oversee quality and consistency in regions to ensure all providers have a positive experience of inspection.
  • Slide 21
  • Preparing for inspection next steps By May 2015 July/August 2015 September 2015 Recruitment of new OI and HMI where required - Common Inspection Framework published - Supporting handbooks for each remit published - Good practice materials published - National launch events held Further training for all inspectors Inspections under new arrangements start June 2015