meteorology clouds

Download Meteorology Clouds

Post on 23-Feb-2016

70 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Meteorology Clouds. Reference. From the Ground Up Chapter 6.2: Clouds Pages 124 - 127. Introduction. Clouds can form in different ways and, as a result, come in many different types. Pilots should know the properties of different types of clouds, and what weather conditions come with them. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

TRANSCRIPT

Clouds

MeteorologyCloudsSep 2012Lesson 4.2ReferenceFrom the Ground UpChapter 6.2:CloudsPages 124 - 127

IntroductionClouds can form in different ways and, as a result, come in many different types.

Pilots should know the properties of different types of clouds, and what weather conditions come with them.OutlineClassificationsSky ConditionCloud Formation

ClassificationsBy formation:Cumulus Vertical clouds, formed by rising air, indicates Unstable AirStratus Horizontal layers, indicates Stable Air

By height (families):Low (Strato)Surface 6 500 ftMiddle (Alto)6 500 ft 23 000 ftHigh (Cirro)16 500 ft 45 000 ftVertical Development1 500 ft and upHigh CloudsCirrus (Ci)Thin wavy, delicate wisps

High CloudsCirrocumulus (Cc)Thin cotton ball or flake-like

High CloudsCirrostratus (Cs)Very thin, high sheetsMakes sky white, halo around sun or moon

Middle CloudsAltocumulus (Ac)Layer or patches of rounded masses

Middle CloudsAltocumulus Castellanus (Acc)Altocumulus with turrets

Middle CloudsAltostratus (As)Thick grey layerSometimes light rain/snow

Low CloudsStratus (St)Uniform layer like fog, but not on ground,Sometimes has drizzleWhen broken, called Stratus Fractus (Sf)

Low CloudsStatocumulus (Sc)Thin layer or patches of rounded masses

Low CloudsNimbostratos (Ns)Uniform thick, dark, grey layerContinuous rain/snow

Vertical DevelopmentCumulus (Cu)Thick, rounded or lumpy individual cloudsWhen fragmented, called Cumulus Fractus (Cf)

Vertical DevelopmentTowering Cumulus (TCu)Very high towering massesRough air underneath

Vertical DevelopmentCumulonimbus (Cb)High, heavy masses going above freezing levelUsually hail inside cloud, heavy rain/snow beneathVery turbulent

Sky ConditionCloud cover broken down into oktas (8ths):Clear0Few1 - 2Scattered3 - 4Broken5 - 7Overcast8

Broken and Overcast considered a CeilingCloud FormationClouds form from condensation or sublimation (water vapour to water droplets or ice). This requires:High relative humidityCondensation nucleiCooling air

Formed in two ways:Air cools to saturation point (most common, by expansion)Air absorbs water vapour to reach saturation pointLifting ProcessesClouds created when air rises, expands, cools, condenses. Following processes force air up:Orographic Lift Air forced up by hills/mountainsConvection Sun heats ground, warm air risesFrontal Lift Warm air forced up over cold frontTurbulence Wind blowing over rough ground creates eddies, forcing up and down currentsConvergence Air inside a low pressure area is forced upwardsNext Lesson4.3 MeteorologyPressure

From the Ground UpChapter 6.3:PressurePages 127 - 130

Recommended

View more >