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SOF Lineage and History Key Points: OSS Lineage; Son Tay Raid; Operation Eagle Claw; UBL Raid USSOCOM heritage is traced back to the Office of Strategic Services led by Major General William “Wild Bill” Donovan. Existing for only 3 ½ years from 1942-1945 the OSS envisioned a military cadre with capacity to merge intelligence and operational activities; forward deployed in the operational environment with a unique ability to understand and influence the psychological and social setting in which uncertainty normally prevails. In 1970, America’s special operators carried out one of the most masterful and daring raids in American military history to rescue American Prisoners of War suspected of being held at Son Tay, a mere 40 miles from the North Vietnamese capital of Hanoi. Yet just ten years later, on Nov. 4, 1979 more than 3,000 Iranian militants stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran, taking 66 Americans hostage and setting the stage for a rescue attempt called Operation Eagle Claw, which has become known as Desert One. The forces tasked, among the best from each of our military Services, could not successfully conduct a complex joint special operation. Desert One, although a mission failure, was the catalyst for change. The Holloway Commission Report that followed the operation recognized that there was a need for a specialized organization for joint special operations, and recommended the establishment of a command to lead and direct the nation’s Special Operations Forces or SOF. SOF now flourishes under the direction of USSOCOM as a focused strategic headquarters with a dedicated fiscal authority. Thirty-one years after the tragedy at Desert One, the command has come full circle with the daring and successful raid at Abbottabad, Pakistan that led to the death of Osama bin Laden.

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Guidance on Briefing Notes:
Suggested briefing remarks are provided in Bold. Key points for the briefer are provided in Italics. Slide TWO embedded video is indicated in notes and must be manually selected. Ensure all video files are locally available on computer and test embedded links prior to the briefing.These files are individually available on both the SOCOM NiPR and SOFREL SOCC-SC portal pages. This is the opening slide and should be up when the personnel enter the room.When you are ready to introduce yourself and begin the following intro is suggested. I am_________________________________. On behalf ofAdmiral Bill McRaven,I welcome you to the U.S. Special Operations Command. We are pleased to have this opportunity to provide an overview of USSOCOM to you. If the Commander is not present for the briefing introduce the embedded video on the next slide with the following : Because the Commander could not be with us today, I would like to open with a brief video message from the ADM Bill McRaven as we start the briefing. SOF Lineage and History
Key Points: OSS Lineage; Son Tay Raid; Operation Eagle Claw; UBL Raid USSOCOM heritage is traced back to the Office of Strategic Services led by Major General William Wild Bill Donovan. Existing for only 3 years from the OSS envisioned a military cadre with capacity to merge intelligence and operational activities; forward deployed in the operational environment with a unique ability to understand and influence the psychological and social setting in which uncertainty normally prevails. In 1970, Americas special operators carried out one of the most masterful and daring raids in American military history to rescue American Prisoners of War suspected of being held at Son Tay, a mere 40 miles from the North Vietnamese capital of Hanoi. Yet just ten years later, on Nov. 4, 1979 more than 3,000 Iranian militants stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, Iran, taking 66 Americans hostage and setting the stage for a rescue attempt called OperationEagle Claw, which has become known as Desert One. The forces tasked, among the best from each of our military Services, could not successfully conduct a complex joint special operation. Desert One, although a mission failure, was the catalyst for change. The Holloway Commission Report that followed the operation recognized that there was a need for a specialized organization for joint special operations, and recommended the establishment of a command to lead and direct the nations Special Operations Forces or SOF. SOF now flourishes under the direction of USSOCOM as a focused strategic headquarters with a dedicated fiscal authority. Thirty-one years after the tragedy at Desert One, the command has come full circle with the daring and successful raid at Abbottabad, Pakistan that led to the death of Osama bin Laden. National Defense Authorization Act of 1986
Secretary OfDefense Under Secretary of Defense (POLICY) Assistant Secretary of Defense (Special Operations Low-Intensity Conflict) U.S. SpecialOperations Command Key Points: NDAA of 1986, the Nunn-Cohen Amendment, andMFP-11 Congress, not the Department of Defense, took the lead in acting on their recommendation. The resulting legislation from Senators Sam Nunn and William Cohen, known as the Nunn-Cohen Amendment to the DoD Authorization Act of 1986, established both USSOCOM and the office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict. The establishment of these two organizations reflects the uniqueness of the command. We are the only command legislated into existence and we are the only command with legislative policy and fiscal oversight. Additionally the amendment created a designated fiscal authority, USSOCOMs separate Major Force Program 11 (MFP-11), to fund special operations equipment, training and operations. Today, USSOCOM is responsible for programming, budgeting and executing nearly $10B dollars annually under this authority. Established the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) and the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations Low Intensity Conflict- ASD (SO/LIC) Unified Commands SECRETARY OF CJCS DEFENSE SERVICE CHIEFS
U.S.STRATEGIC COMMAND U.S. CYBER COMMAND U.S. TRANSPORTATION COMMAND U.S.SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND Key Points: SOCOM Unified Combatant Command Chain of Command and relationship to the other FCCs and GCCs USSOCOM is one of nine Unified Combatant Commands (Currently a USSTRATCOM sub-unified command, U.S. Cyber Command if designated will become the tenth) across the Department of Defense and while similar in many regards, we are unique in that we also exercise numerous Service, Military Department, and Defense Agency-like responsibilities. U.S. PACIFIC COMMAND U.S. NORTHERN COMMAND U.S. SOUTHERN COMMAND U.S. EUROPEAN COMMAND U.S. CENTRAL COMMAND U.S. AFRICA COMMAND A Unique Command with legislated Military A Combatant Command
Department-like authorities Command of all SOF Synchronize planning for global operations against terroristnetworks Deploy SOF to support GCCs As directed, conduct operations globally Plan & execute pre-crisis activities Organize, train, equip SOF Develop SOF strategy, doctrineand tactics Program and budget for SOF Procure SOF-peculiar equipment Monitor management of SOF personnel Ensure interoperability Title 10 Authorities SECTION 164: Responsibility to Combatant Commanders Responsible to POTUS and SECDEF for missions assigned Gives direction to subordinate commands Prescribes the chain of command to commands and forces Organizes the commands and forces Employs forces within that command Assigns command functions, and approves internal organization SECTION 167: Additional responsibility to CDRUSSOCOM Develops strategy, doctrine and tactics Prepares and submits budget proposals and program recommendations Trains assigned forces Army CH-47 Modified with MFP 11 Rapid R & D, production and fielding
Acquisition Agility MH 47G Army CH-47 Modified with MFP 11 Key Points: Acquisition agility and SOF-specific equipment procured through MFP 11 funding Examples of the ways we achieve acquisition agility in equipping our forces through MFP-11 funded direct research, development, procurement include: SOF weapons accessories such as advanced aiming devices, sound suppressors and advanced components for SOF-specific weapons. In some cases thesemodifications prove so revolutionary they are adopted as service common equipment. We also modify service common platforms to meet SOF-specific requirements. In the example in the upper left is the MH-47G Chinook Helicopter. The Army supplies the MH-47 Chinook basic airframe in an Army-common configuration.USSOCOM uses MFP-11 to apply Special Operations-peculiar modifications, including a refueling probe, airframe improvements, engine and radar modifications, advanced aircraft survivability equipment, and the SOF common avionics architecture cockpit. While these modifications significantly increase the aircrafts cost they are essential for the execution of SOF missions. In the lower right, is and example of rapid research and development, production and fielding of a modular weapon system developed with MFP-11 funding. The fielding of the armed AC-130W (STINGER II) Dragon Spear as an armed overwatch platform was urgently needed to support current and expected combat operations. Because of SOCOMs ability to execute rapid research and development (independent of service major aircraft and weapons platforms) the sensors, 30mm gun system, standoff precision guided munitions system operator consoles, and communications equipment was fielded in less than 10 months. AC-130, Stinger II Rapid R & D, production and fielding USSOCOM Mission and Vision
Organize, train and equip SOF Forces Synchronize DOD planning for global operations against terrorist networks. A Globally networked force of SOF, interagency, allies and partners able to rapidly or persistently address regional contingencies and threats to stability - SOCOM Strategy 2020 Key points:Vision statement is from published USSOCOM Strategy 2020 Historically,our mission focus is organizing, training and equipping USSOF, and providing these highly capable joint forces to Geographic Combatant Commanders around the world. As part of this responsibility,we seek to improve the development and acquisition of SOF-unique capabilities, capacities, and authorities that allow them to conduct special operations in a variety of operational environments. In the wake of the attacks of 9/11, (Build) SOCOMwas assigned the additional responsibilityof synchronizing planning against terrorist networks on behalfof the Department of Defense. As a result , this synchronization is an essential elementof the current mission. In addition,the Defense Strategic Guidanceand Chairmans strategic directiondemands our focus to extend beyond this current assigned responsibility to achieve our end state of globally networked SOF, interagency, allies, and partners capable of rapidly or persistently addressing regional contingencies and threats to stability USSOCOM Priorities LOO 1. WIN THE CURRENT FIGHT VISION:
DESIRED OUTCOMES VISION: A GLOBALLY NETWORKED FORCE OF SOF, INTERAGENCY, ALLIES, AND PARTNERS ABLE TO RAPIDLYOR PERSISTENTLY ADDRESS REGIONAL CONTINGENCIES AND THREATS TO STABILITY MULTILATERAL SOF CAPABILTIES THAT CAN IDENTIFY, DISRUPT, AND/OR DEFEAT THREATS INCREASESUPPORT TO GCCs LOO 2. GLOBAL SOF NETWORK TSOCS ARE THE HUB OF AN EXPANDED SOF NETWORK AGILE SOF NETWORK, SYNCHRONIZED GLOBALLY Key Points: USSOCOM Commanders Priorities The Commanders priorities as defined in the SOCOMStrategy 2020 provide strategic direction for SOF to prepare and operate in dynamic and diverse environments.SOCOM will guide efforts to win the current fight; expand the Global SOF partnership; preserve our force and families and provide responsive resourcing. The imperative to win the