Final Annotated Bibliography 2.11.13

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FDR's New Deal: A Radical Shift in American Domestic Policy - NHD 2013 Bibliography

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Works Cited Primary Sources Anonymous. "Social Security Advertisement." Social Policy: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 160-161. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. The Social Security Act of 1935 gave millions of Americans the aid they needed at the time of its conception. This advertisement gave me a visual to help understand what exactly the act did and the help it provided. "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" Perf. Bing Crosby. Lyrics by E.Y. "Yip" Harburg. Comp. Jay Gorney. Rec. 1931. New Americana. 1931. CD. "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" is one of the most famous Great Depression songs. It set the tone nicely for my introduction page by setting up a dismal scene in which the artist is a beggar. "The Builders of Timberline Lodge." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 222-225. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. The Builders of the Timberline Lodge was a book written by the Oregon Writers' Project to show the public the success of the Works Progress Administration as well as to employ writers and celebrate the lodge as a travel destination. This excerpt

from the book written by the Oregon Writers' Project showed me the success of the Works Progress Administration. CCC workers planting crops. TQN. Unknown, n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2013. . This photograph shows CCC workers plating crops in a field. Child protesting high unemployment. Baruch College. WordPress and Buddy Press, n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2013. . Times were dire, and this photo is the epitome of that. "Dust Bowl Blues." Perf. Woody Guthrie. Rec. 1940. Dust Bowl Ballads. Victor Records, 1940. CD. This song goes nicely with my introduction, it talks about the dust bowls that destroyed the plains farming industry during the early Great Depression. "First Inaugural Address of President Franklin D. Roosevelt." Government, Politics, and Protest: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 270-274. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. Franklin Delano Roosevelt inherited the office of President in one of the worst times possible, during the Great Depression. His first inauguration speech reassured the American people and outlined the

future including the New Deal he planned to institute. Roosevelt knew that he would have to be very active in curing the economy and country and he addressed the issue in his speech and subsequently entering the Hundred Days' Reform. Franklin D. Roosevelt: "Fireside Chat.," April 28, 1935. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Fireside Chats were a very important part of his presidency, as they gave every citizen the feel that the President was in their living room talking to them personally. These chats gave me an idea of FDR's appeal to the public and also a description of some of the programs he put into place for the average person. Franklin D. Roosevelt: "Fireside Chat (Recovery Program).," July 24, 1933. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Fireside Chats were a very important part of his presidency, as they gave every citizen the feel that the President was in their living room talking to them personally. These chats gave me an idea of FDR's appeal to the public and also a description of some of the programs he put into place for the average person. Franklin D. Roosevelt: "Fireside Chat on Banking," March 12, 1933. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Fireside Chats were a very important part of his presidency, as they gave every citizen the feel that the President was in their living room talking to them personally. These chats gave me an idea of FDR's appeal to the public and also a description of some of the programs he put into place for the average person. Franklin D. Roosevelt: "Second Fireside Chat.," May 7, 1933. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Fireside

Chats were a very important part of his presidency, as they gave every citizen the feel that the President was in their living room talking to them personally. These chats gave me an idea of FDR's appeal to the public and also a description of some of the programs he put into place for the average person. Hoovervilles in Seattle. 1 Mar. 1934. Photograph. King County Archives. Seattle King County Dept. of Health Photographs, Seattle. Box 1 (112-275. This photo gave me an accurate illustration of the hardships many endured during the Great Depression. "John Maynard Keynes to President Roosevelt, February 1, 1938." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 147-151. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. John Maynard Keynes was an English economist whose support of the New Deal helped increase the public support of the New Deal. This letter was written shortly after the time period of my project but it still shows the influence Keynes may have had on Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Lining up for Job Applications. Library of the University of Minnesota. U of Minnesota, n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. . This picture showed me how hard it was to get a job at a time when many people were unemployed. "On Social Security." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 19301939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 305-309. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 17 Jan. 2013. This primary sources is a message from President Franklin Delano Roosevelt on June 8, 1934, which was sent to Congress to asking them to address the need for a better economic security system. This economic system FDR is talking about will eventually become known as Social Security, and it consists of benefits for the unemployed, retired, single mothers, and public health agencies. "Prenatal Care for Rural Poor." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 555-558. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. One of the provisions in the Social Security Act allowed for 3.8 million dollars to be given to states to improve the life of poor mothers and children living in rural areas. This article quoted part of the Social Security Act of 1935 and it expanded my knowledge on the conditions of life for some people in the Great Depression. "President Franklin Delano Roosevelt." CIA. United States Government, n.d. Web. 8 Feb. 2013. . This portrait provided me with a photograph of the leader of the US during the New Deal. Roosevelt, Franklin D. "Radio Address Roosevelt's Defense of the New Deal." Social Policy: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 172-176. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. Many Republicans criticized legislation of the New Deal, especially as the Great Depression went on even after many programs had been created. This article provided me with Roosevelt's own defense of the New Deal, and helped me get a better understanding of the situation. Roosevelt, Franklin D. "Speech Upon Signing the Social Security Act." Social Policy: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 170-172. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. The Social Security Act provided millions of retired Americans with security and protection against old age and hazards. Roosevelt's speech after signing the Act was a significant part of the New Deal and marked a turning point in government. "Social Security Poster." WordPress. WordPress, n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. . A poster of a Social Security Advertisement.

"What's Cooking Uncle Sam." Archives. United States Government, n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2013. . A man working with an AAA poster in the background. Workers with building in background. Princeton. Princeton, n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. . This photograph depicts workers building a building contracted by the WPA. "Works Progress Administration Reports." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 121-133. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Jan. 2013. This primary source shows several reports on the success of the Works Progress Administration, which was a program in the New Deal that put 8.5 million people to work at the cost of 11 billion dollars. An excerpt from the Report on the Progress of the Works Programs shows several detailed graphs/tables that help me understand some of the numbers, as well as talking about the relief of the FERA and CWA. "WPA Intro." The Library of Congress. United States Government, n.d. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. . This photograph provided me with a visualization of the public works the WPA accomplished.

Secondary Sources Clarke, Jeanne Nienaber. "Public Works Administration (PWA)." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression. Ed. Robert S. McElvaine. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 782-788. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. The Public Works Administration, created by the National Industrial Recovery Act, was a key component of the Hundred Days. This article in the Encyclopedia of the Great Depression told me about the many projects undertaken in the United States under this legislation such as creating schools or building dams. FEARON, PETER. "Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA)." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression. Ed. Robert S. McElvaine. Vol. 1. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 340-344. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 6 Feb. 2013. The Federal Emergency Relief Administration was founded on May 12, 1933, with its main purpose being to distribute money to states on grants rather than on loans. This secondary source helped me understand the importance of the FERA and how it distributed money based on data such as relief programs, taxes, etc. "Franklin Delano Roosevelt." Presidential Administration Profiles for Students. Ed. Kelle S. Sisung and Gerda-Ann Raffaelle. Detroit: Gale Group, 2003. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 17 Jan. 2013. This article is a short biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's life. This biography gave me insight on FDR's early life and how his time as a governor affected his views and ideas. The Great Depression & New Deal. Prod. Schlessinger Media. 1996, 2003. Film. The Great Depression was the greatest economic collapse in the history of the United States. This

half hour long documentary gave me visual evidence of the hardships people endured as well as it described the legislation instituted by Franklin Delano Roosevelt during the first and second New Deal. Hamilton, David. "Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA)." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression. Ed. Robert S. McElvaine. Vol. 1. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 18-22. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 14 Jan. 2013. The Agricultural Adjustment Administration was another important part of the Hundred Days and it was created to address the farming crisis in the US during the Great Depression. This article described the importance of the AAA and how it saved the farming industry while also giving a description of the criticism it received. Lawson, Alan. "New Deal." Dictionary of American History. Ed. Stanley I. Kutler. 3rd ed. Vol. 6. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2003. 41-46. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 9 Jan. 2013. The New Deal marked a turning point in American history by drastically changing old economic, political, and social policies. This article on the New Deal from the Dictionary of American History argues that this moment in American had an impact comparable to that of the Civil War. The article gave a detailed overview of the policies that defined the New Deal and shows the three phases of the New Deal: the origin/design, the plan in action, and the final phase/aftermath. Markham, Jerry W. "Social Security Act of 1935." Major Acts of Congress. Ed. Brian K. Landsberg. Vol. 3. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 199-204. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. The purpose of the Social Security Act of 1935 was to provide a pension for retired American workers, although this program expanded greatly in the coming years. This article helped me understand the benefits as well as

several different proposals that were brought up in conjunction with the Social Security Act of 1935. "The New Deal and its Critics." American Decades. Ed. Judith S. Baughman, et al. Vol. 4: 19301939. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 9 Jan. 2013. This secondary source from American Decades provided me with a detailed background of criticism that stemmed from different aspects of politics at the time period. The article talked about Progressives, FDR's Brain Trust, and wages among other things. "The New Deal in Education." American Decades. Ed. Judith S. Baughman, et al. Vol. 4: 19301939. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 9 Jan. 2013. This secondary source gave an overview of the impact the New Deal had on education. The entry sites how the CCC, FERA, and WPA helped out in education by providing salaries, classes in camps, and literacy classes. O'Connell-Todd, Kym. "Tennessee Valley Authority." Dictionary of American History. Ed. Stanley I. Kutler. 3rd ed. Vol. 8. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2003. 88-89. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. The Tennessee Valley Authority provided the crippled Tennessee Valley region and subsequently other areas with flood control and power generation. This article put the huge impact this act had on the Tennessee Valley region in perspective with raw numbers such as how the TVA provided low cost electricity to 500,000 customers by 1941. Ohl, John Kennedy. "National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA)." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression. Ed. Robert S. McElvaine. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 676-678. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. The National Industrial Recovery Act was a law that contained three parts, and was announced by Roosevelt that

it was the "most important and far-reaching legislation ever enacted by the American Congress." This source provided me with background on the NIRA that was necessary to have for my section on the Hundred Days. Salmond, John A. "Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression. Ed. Robert S. McElvaine. Vol. 1. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 174-179. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. The Civilian Conservation Corps was one of the first agencies that was created by FDR during the hundred days of the New Deal whose main goal was to provide jobs for unemployed Americans during the Great Depression. The Civili...