discovering unmet needs and new solutions with participatory design

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  • Jennifer Briselli Managing Director, Experience Design

    @jbrisellijbriselli@madpow.com

    Participatory DesignDiscovering Unmet Needs & New Solutions

  • What is Participatory Design?

    Why might you use these this approach in your own practice?

    What are some methods and activities, and how do you choose them?

    What does it look like? How do you do it?

    What do you do with the results of a workshop?

    Overview

  • What is Participatory Design?

  • What it is:

    An approach to design that invites all stakeholders (e.g. end users, employees, partners, customers, citizens, consumers, patients, providers) into the design process as a means of better understanding, meeting, and sometimes preempting their needs.

    What it is not:

    A way to make your users do your job for you A single prescriptive method or tool A rigidly defined process

    (see also: co-design, co-creation, co-production, collaborative design) A holy grail

    What is Participatory Design?

  • Involving the people were serving through design as participants in the process.

    What is Participatory Design?

  • Design Process

    DISCOVER

    Adapted from Double Diamond Model of Product Definition and Design from UK Design Council

  • DISCOVER SYNTHESIZE

    Design Process

    Adapted from Double Diamond Model of Product Definition and Design from UK Design Council

  • DISCOVER SYNTHESIZE GENERATE

    Design Process

    Adapted from Double Diamond Model of Product Definition and Design from UK Design Council

  • DISCOVER SYNTHESIZE GENERATE FOCUS

    Design Process

    Adapted from Double Diamond Model of Product Definition and Design from UK Design Council

  • DISCOVER SYNTHESIZE GENERATE FOCUS

    EVALUATE

    Design Process

    Adapted from Double Diamond Model of Product Definition and Design from UK Design Council

  • DISCOVER SYNTHESIZE GENERATE FOCUS

    Adapted from Double Diamond Model of Product Definition and Design from UK Design Council

    Generates design principles & direction

    Generates viable solution concepts

    Where does participatory design fit in?

  • Participatory design methods, especially generative or making activities, provide a design language for non designers (future users) to imagine and express their own ideas for how they want to live, work, and play in the future. - Liz Sanders

    In other words:

    It leads to better experiences & outcomes.

    Why its useful

  • Generative methods uncover latent needs.

    Image: Liz Sanders

  • Framing: Identifying goals, objectives, key questions, hypotheses

    Planning: Planning activities that answer these questions

    Facilitating: Ensuring & documenting productive participation

    Analyzing: Making sense of it all to identify actionable insights

    How to do it

  • 1. Choose table group & topic

    2. Discuss your personal experiences within this topic

    3. As a group, identify a specific problem space, challenge, or subtopic that everyone in the group feels some familiarity with

    4. Write the problem statement youll focus on today

    How might we improve...How might we support...How might we reduce...

    Group Breakout & Topic Selection

  • Topics

    Navigating a confusing health insurance situation

    Living with a chronic condition

    Challenges of being a caregiver

    End of life care

    Supporting people with addiction

    Providing care to underserved populations

    Pregnancy support

    Choose your own

  • Framing

  • Stakeholders, Co-creators, End Users

    Challenges & Goals

    Questions & Unknowns

    Assumptions & Hypotheses

    Choosing Activities

    Framing

  • Three categories of activity

    Narrate: Participants help us understand their needs via storytelling

    Create: Participants generate ideas and create prototypes of products, services, or experiences (these can be very realistic or completely unrealistic) Sometimes participants create viable solution concepts Sometimes participants create items that give designers insight & direction

    Prioritize: Participants make connections and judgments that help us understand the value of potential design solutions

    Choosing activities & methods

  • Telling stories helps participants express more detailed and emotionally resonant experiences. These activities are intended to elicit memories and help build empathy and understanding.

    Examples: Journey mapping Love letter/breakup letter Collaging Empathy mapping Knowledge hunt Reenactments

    Narrate activities

  • Participants can provide a lot of insight when provided tools and opportunities to design without constraints or expectations.

    Examples: Magic screen/button/object Interface toolkit Physical/paper/rapid prototyping Fill in the blank Ideal workflow Ecosystem mapping

    Create activities

  • These activities help participants and designers evaluate and understand the value of existing experiences or potential future design solutions.

    Examples: Card sorting Channel sorting Value ranking Storyboard/Concept speed dating Bodystorming/Gamestorming

    Prioritize activities

  • The design prompt sets the stage and ensures participants will focus their contributions on the goals, questions, or hypotheses youve identified.

    For example:

    Use the items provided to create a perfect remote control.

    Draw an imaginary classroom that provides all your educational needs.

    Create a script for the ideal interaction between a student and counselor.

    Design Prompts

  • 1. Identify a design goal for your topic problem statement

    Framing: Lets Try It

  • 1. Identify a design goal for your topic problem statement

    2. Create a design prompt for participants

    Well try two activities today: Collage Magic Object

    Framing: Lets Try It

  • Collage

    This activity helps members express their experiences and needs in a way words can sometimes fail to describe. Participants will also put themselves at the center of the map, which allows us to understand how members conceive of their own agency (or lack thereof).

    How: Participants are provided a prompt and asked to spend 30-45 minutes creating a collage that describes their feelings about the prompt. Participants are then asked to share and discuss their collage. Facilitators may ask participants to elaborate to better elucidate examples and opportunities.

    Materials:paper, images, glue sticks or tape, writing utensils, post-its

  • Magic Object

    Providing members with materials that allow them to engage in a making process can provide insights about potential design solutions as well as uncover latent needs.

    How: Participants are provided building materials and a prompt, and asked to spend 30-45 minutes creating the objects.Participants are then asked to share and briefly discuss their creations. Facilitators may ask members to elaborate on aspects of their explanation where appropriate to elucidate examples and opportunities.

    Materials:Paper, construction materials, glue sticks or tape

  • 1. Identify a design goal for your topic problem statement2. Create a design prompts for participants

    Activity 1: CollageEx: What does the health care landscape look like to you right now?Ex: What does your experience as a health provider feel like to you?

    Activity 2: Magic ObjectEx: Use the items provided to create any kind of tool, service, or magic item that would make the hospital stay experience better for you.Ex: Use the items provided to create a magic device that would make your daily nursing responsibilities easier to manage.

    Framing: Lets Try It

  • Planning

  • Where: office, school, home, outdoors, in context

    Who & how many: large group, small group, individual

    Observation methods: notes, video, photo, artifacts

    Materials: construction kits, legos, playdoh

    Logistics: recruiting (>2 weeks), honorarium, volunteers, observers

    Planning

  • Facilitating

  • Be prepared

    Be yourself

    Be flexible & adaptive

    Be reflective

    Be warm & friendly

    Facilitating: Participation

  • Document Document Document Dedicated note taker(s) Photograph Record audio & visual when possible Keep artifacts when possible

    Ask participants to tell you about what they create Show & tell Share a story Write a commercial Create a pitch

    What they create is often less important than how they describe its value.

    Facilitating: Capturing Value

  • Facilitating: Lets Try It

    Activity 1: Collage

    ParticipantsFollow your groups design prompt to create a collage based on your own personal experiences.

    FacilitatorsObserve your groups participants. Take notes and ask questions. Near the end of the activity, you will ask each participant to explain their creation.

  • LUNCH

  • Facilitating: Lets Discuss

    Activity 1: Collage

    ParticipantsWhat did you think about the experience?

    FacilitatorsWhat kinds of things did you see, hear, and think during the activity?

  • Facilitating: Lets Try It

    Activity 2: Magic Object

    ParticipantsFollow your groups design prompt to create an object based on your own personal experiences.

    FacilitatorsObserve your groups participants. Take notes and ask questions. Near the end of the activity, you will ask each participant to explain their creation.

  • Facilit