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  • RW-44

    5wCreative Arts Activities:Visual Arts, Music, Movement and Dance, and Dramatic Play and Theater

    VISUAL ARTS: SMALL GROUP

    5-31w WoodworkingGOALS: To increase visual arts concepts; to encourage creativity; to improve cause-and-eff ect reasoning

    STANDARDS: VA 1 Understand and apply media, tech-niques, and processes; VA 2 Use knowledge of structures and functions; VA 3 Choose and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas.

    MATERIALS: Small pieces of soft wood, nails (long enough to hold two pieces of the wood together, but short enough that the point does not stick out), hammers, woodworking table, markers

    PROCEDURE: Set up a center where children can use ham-mers and nails; be sure it is large enough for children to

    hammer their creations together. Encourage children to use diff erent materials, to try to hammer two pieces of wood together to make something, and to describe what they are making. Encourage children to color or paint their creations.

    ACCOMMODATIONS AND INTEGRATION: Have children use safety glasses, and have a vise and clamps to hold the wood in place. Use wood glue and clamps if hammering is not advisable. Encourage children to make projects that are more complex by allowing them to work on the project for several days. Woodworking is an empowering activity and allows children to feel in control and independent. It en-courages children who may not participate in art to become involved.

    All children are creative, some more so than others. Some chil-

    dren are more creative in one area than in other areas. Educators

    have an important role in the development of creativity: They can

    actively support creativity or squelch it. The response children

    receive about their creative efforts plays a large part in their cre-

    ative development. Educators can enhance the experience by

    having children think more about the process, as it will affect the

    product.

    ACTIVITY GOALS AND STANDARDSActivities are organized by the goals and standards they sup-

    port. The activities themselves serve as prototypes of activities

    that can be used again and again with minor changes. Books

    that are referred to in the text with an * have a complete citation

    and annotation in the Childrens Bibliography; others have a

    complete citation where they are cited. For books where a lexile

    score is available, it is given after the book title, for example

    (500L). The notation AD before the lexile means that the book

    the book needs adult direction and should initially be read by

    an adult and discussed with children before children read it

    independently.

    Cengage Learning 2012

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  • Creative Arts Activities: Visual Arts, Music, Movement and Dance, and Dramatic Play and Th eater RW-45

    VISUAL ARTS: SMALL GROUP

    5-32w Making DyesGOALS: To increase visual arts concepts; to improve cause-and-eff ect reasoning; to make predictions

    STANDARDS: VA 1 Understand and apply media, tech-niques, and processes; VA 4 Understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures; SC 5 Science in personal and social perspectives.

    MATERIALS: Large pot, stove or hot plate, red cabbage, onion peels, spinach, tea, beets, white cotton fabric cut into small pieces, tongs

    PROCEDURE: Have the children examine the various foods in a small group. Discuss with the children how people used food to create diff erent colors for fabrics. Th ey would put the food into boiling water, add the fabric, and let it soak until it was the color they wanted. Have children take turns making predic-tions about what color the fabric will turn when placed in a pot with diff erent foods for diff erent amounts of time. After mak-ing the predictions, let the children experiment with the diff er-ent food dyes. Discuss the outcomes with the children.

    ACCOMMODATIONS AND INTEGRATION: Use only one or two foods that have the fastest, most obvious eff ects (beets). En-courage children to experiment with leaving the material in the dye for diff erent lengths of time and chart the outcome. Have them predict what will happen if they tie a knot in the material or put the cloth in several diff erent dyes. Children can use the fabric to make something.

    VISUAL ARTS: INDIVIDUAL OR SMALL GROUP

    5-33w Texture PaintGOALS: To increase visual arts concepts; to improve cause-and-eff ect reasoning; to make predictions

    STANDARDS: VA 1 Understand and apply media, tech-niques, and processes; VA 3 Choose and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas; VA 5 Refl ect on and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

    MATERIALS: Add texture to each color of easel paint with one of the following:

    fl our: lumpy (do not stir it too much)

    salad oil: oily

    sugar: shiny, grainy (use right away)

    sawdust: rough

    salt: shiny, grainy syrup: sticky

    sand: gritty

    PROCEDURE: Have the children experiment with various paint textures. Encourage them to predict how the added substance will aff ect the paint and its texture. Experiment with making diff erent colors and diff erent textures (red: rough-sawdust; blue: oily-salad oil; yellow: lumpy-fl our).

    Focus on the cause-and-eff ect relationship in the materials added and the change in texture. Talk with children about their expectations and purpose of their picture and how the change in the paint will change their picture (outcome). When their picture is complete talk, with children about the process and encourage them to refl ect on how the texture infl uenced their art and that of others.

    ACCOMMODATIONS AND INTEGRATION: Experiment with only one color and texture at a time. Have children describe not only the diff erent visual features of the picture but also the tactile ones. Th is activity provides both tactile and visual variations of a familiar substance.

    VISUAL ARTS: SMALL GROUP

    5-34w StencilsGOALS: To increase visual arts concepts; to improve cause-and-eff ect reasoning; to identify and understand patterns and relationships

    STANDARDS: VA 1 Understand and apply media, tech-niques, and processes; VA 3 Choose and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas; VA 5 Refl ect on and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

    MATERIALS: Construction paper, scissors, paint, poster board, cotton balls, colored chalk, crayons, tape or bits of adhesive, stencils

    PROCEDURE: Talk with children about the problems of making identical pictures. Talk about stencils and how they are used. Give the children poster board and have them cut holes or designs for a stencil in the poster board. If they want a symmetrical design (e.g., heart, fl ower, person), it is easiest if they fold the poster board in half fi rst. Encourage them to think about how they will use the stencil. When they have completed the stencil, place it on construction paper and use tape or bits of adhesive to keep the stencil in one place as the children color it. Have children use colored chalk or crayons to color the opening (or rub the colored chalk with a cotton ball). Demonstrate how to work from the edge of the stencil to the center of the opening, and have them color until they have a clear print. Th en have them move the stencil and make a re-peating pattern. Help children refl ect on the pattern they made and the eff ectiveness of the techniques they used to make the patterns the same. Encourage them to look at other patterns made by diff erent stencils and to talk to the children who made them about the techniques they used.

    ACCOMMODATIONS AND INTEGRATION: Have simple stencils available for the children to use. Add stencils where two or three stencils (one for each color) must be used to make the desired object. Talk with children about using stencils to make repeating patterns. Show them commercially made stencils and how they are used. If they want to use more than one color, explain how this is done.

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  • RW-46 Resource Chapter Five Online

    VISUAL ARTS: SMALL GROUP

    5-35w Torn Paper FlowersGOALS: To increase visual arts concepts; to encourage cre-ativity; to improve cause-and-eff ect reasoning

    STANDARDS: VA 1 Understand and apply media, tech-niques, and processes; VA 2 Use knowledge of structures and functions; VA 3 Choose and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas.

    MATERIALS: A pot or vase of fl owers, construction paper, colored paper scraps, glue stick, crayons

    PROCEDURE: Show the children the fl owers. Discuss the parts that make up the fl ower (stem, petals, leaves, etc.). Help them experiment with pieces of paper of diff erent sizes and shapes for diff erent purposes. Show them how to curl the paper around a pencil so it curls away from the paper to add depth and where to glue the petal so it curls out. Once the children understand the concept, allow them the freedom to make their fl ower. Provide crayons and markers to complete details.

    ACCOMMODATIONS AND INTEGRATION: Let children experi-ment by tearing the paper and gluing it. Encou