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THE BULLDOG.A MONOGRAPHTHIRD EDITION.

BY

EDGAR FARMAN,Honorary Member of the Bulldog Club (Incorporated), &c.

THE " KKNNKL GAZETTE," 7,' GRAFTON1903.

LONDO N: STREET, BOND STREET, W,

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The Bulldog, devoted solely to the most barbarous and infamous purposes, the real blackguard of his species, has no claim upon utility, humanity, or common sense, and the total extinction of the breed is a desirable consummation. "BRITISH FIELD SPORTS," 1818.

TO MY FRIEND

JOHN WILLIAM ROSS. ESQUIRE.

PALL MALL. LONDON,

I

DEDICATE

THIS

BOOK

AS A

MARK

OF MY

ESTEEM,

TO

THE F I R S T

EDITION.

ENCOURAGED by the reception that my previous literary efforts on behalf of the National breed have received, I have undertaken the production of the present work, in the hope that its pages will be found useful for reference as an historical and practical volume upon the English Bulldog. It has been my endeavor to deal with the subject in such a way that this single volume may embrace information until now scattered in many quarters. This equally applies to the history of the Bulldog Club Incorporated, which, until the articles written by me during my Honorary Editorship of the Kennel Gazette appeared in that journal, had never been published. Since these articles appeared, I have been able to augment the information they contained in several important particulars, and especially by the inclusion of the first report of the proceedings of the Club, which will be of great interest to past as well as to present members, and will supply a gap in its history, which has existed for a quarter of a century. The illustrations have been selected with the view of including portraits of the more typical Bulldogs of the century, from the days when bull-baiting was a flourishing form of sport down to this, its closing year. I have in the chapter dealing with the illustrations given further particulars supplementary to the information given at the foot of each.

Preface.In dealing with the Bulldogs themselves, I have traced their history from the Bull-baiting and dog-fighting era down to the commencement of the dog showing period, and from those days until now, in a way that I hope may prove interesting to the general reader. I have added such details, both with regard to strains and pedigrees, and to notable owners as will make the book helpful for future reference. As a work upon Bulldogs without reference to Toy Bulldogs and their recent introduction to the show bench would be incomplete, I have added a chapter concerning these diminutive representatives of the breed. The production of the volume has necessarily entailed considerable labour and research, but the labour has been expended upon a breed I have been devoted to for many years, and if the perusal of the book proves interesting to the reader I shall consider myself amply repaid for any trouble expended in its preparation. In order to facilitate ready reference, separate indices have been supplied of all the persons and dogs mentioned in the volume, in addition to the general index and the chapter dealing with the illustrations, which latter contains references to the page where each illustration can be found. I desire to express my sincere thanks to all those who have in any way assisted by supplying me with or affording me the opportunity of obtaining information, and especially I wish to acknowledge the aid thus given by Mr. James "W. Berrie, Mr. Frank W. Crowther, Mr. Cyril F. W, Jackson, Mr. Sam Woodiwiss, Mr. G. W. Richards, and Mr. Alfred George. I have also to thank all those who have kindly lent me photographs for reproduction. EDGAR FARMAN. The Kennel Club, November, 1899.

PREFACETO THE SECOND EDITION.

THE demand for copies of this work resulting second edition early in

in the need to

for a the

the year is naturally gratifying

Author, as evidencing that the contents of these pages have proved of use to those interested in the national breed.

The chapters requiring additions have been brought up to date, and I am able to publish some interesting additions to the chapter comprising the historical sketch of the Bulldog. I take this opportunity of sincerely thanking many friends and unknown to me, and also the many

other readers, personally organs

of the Press who have in kindly labours.

terms

expressed

appreciation

of my

EDGAR

FARMAN.

KENNEL CLUB DECEMBER, 1900.

PREFACETO THE THIRD EDITION.

IN publishing- the third edition of this work I have taken the opportunity of presenting it in a modified form, confining its chapters to the dog, and omitting the history of the Bulldog Club, which has already appeared in the two previous editions. I have, however, added a chapter on the " French Bulldog," with illustrations, a breed, which has, since the second edition was published, become established in this country through the formation of a Club to foster its interests. I again thank all those who have expressed their approval of my endeavors to present a work both of use and interest to all who regard the national breed as one which should be perpetuated, and who do not agree with the writer in British Field Sports a century ago who declared that " the total extinction of the breed is a desirable consummation." EDGAR FARMAN.

THE KENNEL CLUB, OCTOBER, 1903.

CONTENTS.PART I.PAGE

THE BULLDOG

CHAPTER I. Historical Sketch of the BulldogBull and Bear Baiting CHAPTER II. The Bulldog as Dog Fighter CHAPTER III. Old Fanciers, and Old Dogs CHAPTER IV. Early Dog ShowsBulldog Classification CHAPTER V. Modern BulldogsThe Principal Strains CHAPTER VI. Description of a Bulldog and Scale of Points CHAPTER VII. Toy Bulldogs CHAPTER VIII. The French Bulldog CHAPTER IX. Hints to NovicesHow to choose a Bull-pup CHAPTER X. The Illustrations 66 61 57 51 44 33 30 25 20 1

PART II.APPENDICES. Bulldog Clubs and Societies General Index Index to the Names of Persons Index to the Names of Dogs 83 89 87 93

THE BULLDOG.CHAPTER I.HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE BULLDOGBULL AND BEAR BAITING.

THE origin of the Bulldog, as is the case with most of the ancient breeds of dogs, has given rise to much speculation ; authorities differ entirely upon the question, so much so that the very definition of the name itself is in dispute, some writers suggesting that the breed derives its name, not from its use in bull-baiting, but from the bulllike shape of the head.* The Bulldog is first mentioned in literature, in the year 1500, the oldest spelling of the word is Bonddogge** and Bolddogge*** ; while Dr Caius (1576) uses the term Bandogge, " so called, " says William Harrison, in his "Description of England" (Ed. 1586), "because many of them are tied up in chains and strong bonds in the day time for doing hurt abroad, which is an huge dog, stubborn, ugly, eager, burthenouse of bodie (and therefore of little swiftness), terrible and fearful to behold, and oftentimes more fierce and fell than any Archadiart or Corsican cur. Our * New English Dictionary; article, Bulldog. ** W. Wulcher (1500), Hic molossusa Bonddogge. *** Cocke Sorrelles (1500), " Than come one with two Bolddogges at his tayle." Dr Caius's " Treatise on the Dog." graves."

Englishmen, to the intent that these dogs may be more cruel and fierce, assist nature with some art, use, and customs. For although this kind of dog be capable of courage, violent, valiant, stout, and bold, yet will they increase these their stomachs by teaching them to bait the bear, the bull, the lion, and other such like cruell and bloudie beasts (either brought over or kept up at home for the same purpose), without any collar to defend their throats, and oftentimes thereto they train them up in fighting and wrestling with a man (having for the safeguard of his life, either a pike, staff, club, sword, or privie coat), whereby they become more fierce and cruel to strangers.' Dr Caius in his description, amongst other characteristics, states that the Mastive or Banddogge is "serviceable against the fox and the badger, to drive wild and tame swine out of meadows, pastures, glebelandes, and places planted with fruit, to bite and take the bull by the ears, when occasion so requireth." The Bandog is only once mentioned by Shakespeare, the instance occurring in the second part of King Henry VI., act 1, scene 4: " The time when screech-owles cry and bandogs howie, And spirits walk, and ghosts break up their

2

Historical Sketch of the Bulldog. the " Allan of Chaucer," a dog highly extolled by that poet, as of great size, strength and courage, and used in the chase of " the lion and the bear." * The name of this longextinct breed was variously written Alan Alande, Alant, Alaune, Alaunus, Alaunt, and Allan. Cotgrave, in his French-English Dictionary, published in 1632, mentions the Allan de boucherie as being " like our Mastive, and serves butchers to bring in fierce oxen, and to keep their stalls." Edmond de Langley, Duke of York, and fourth of the seven sons of Edward III. was master of the game and of the hawks to Henry IV., and wrote a highly valuable treatise entitled the "Mayster of Game." The manuscript gives most interesting descriptions of dogs, wild animals of the chase and hunting. In this work Langley subdivides the Alaunt into three classes, as follows: " Alaunt is a maner and natre of hounds, and the good Alauntz ben the which men clepyn Alauntz gentil. Other there byn that men clepyn Alauntz ventreres. Others byn Alauntz of the bocherie, they that be gentile shuld be made and shape as a greyhounde, evyn of a