BREATHITT HIGH SCHOOL Arts and Humanities: Discovering Map.pdfBREATHITT HIGH SCHOOL Arts and Humanities: Discovering Art History ... and Egyptian communities reflect ... I can explain how Roman art and architecture

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1 BREATHITT HIGH SCHOOL Arts and Humanities: Discovering Art History Units: I. Part One: The World and Work of the Artist Lesson 1: Learning About Art Learning Targets for Students: I can explain how there is no single definitive definition of art I can understand that art uses visual images to communicate I can appreciate how learning about art is an enriching experience Lesson 2: The Visual Communication Process Learning Targets for Students: I can understand how subject matter, media, design and craftsmanship interrelate I can understand that art communicates ideas visually I can discuss how each era and culture uses the components of art and design in individual ways I can discern certain evolutionary developments that have occurred over time II. Part Two: Trends and Influences in the World of Art Lesson 3: Looking for a Common Denominator Learning Targets for Students: I can understand that art from various cultures throughout history share certain characteristics and interests I can explain how art demonstrates peoples relationships with one another and society at large Lesson 4: Non-Western Art and Cultural Influences Learning Targets for Students: I can appreciate the diversity of artistic expressions from cultures around the globe I can identify similarities and differences in terms of function, materials and design of the artworks from various non-Western societies 2 III. Part Three: Art in the Western World Lesson 5: Beginnings of Western Art Learning Targets for Students: I can describe the style, techniques and skills of prehistoric artists I can explain how the art and culture of ancient Middle Eastern and Egyptian communities reflect their advanced societies Lesson 6: Greek and Roman Art Learning Targets for Students: I can understand that civilizations along the Aegean existed simultaneously with Mesopotamian and Egyptian cultures I can understand that Aegean cultures were the forebears of Greek society I can identify how the Greeks used harmony and unity to portray the human form in an idealized manner I can explain how Roman art and architecture adopted aspects of the cultures the empire conquered, particularly the Greeks Lesson 7: Religious Conviction Learning Targets for Students: I can explain why during the Christian era, art shifts from earlier Greek and Roman traditions of realism toward a strong use of symbols. I can understand that under Justinian, the Byzantine Empire moved to the East in 527 A.D. and that the emperor was extremely influential in fostering the art of his reign. I can understand that during the seventh century, the rival faith of Islam, which began in Arabia, spread rapidly to the Near East and the southern Mediterranean. I can describe Islamic art and explain why it relied heavily on geometric and abstract forms. I can understand that early medieval art was made largely by nomadic tribes until Charlemagne fostered a revival of Classical culture in the late eighth and early ninth centuries. Lesson 8: Romanesque and Gothic Art Learning Targets for Students: 3 I can understand that the Church gained tremendous power in medieval Europe and initiated artistic endeavors to demonstrate its powerful role as political, religious and cultural leader of the West. I can understand how Romanesque art was designed to evoke powerful responses through its spirited and emotional style I can explain how Gothic art, particularly sacred architecture, communicated the united between exterior and inner spaces and the connection between God and humankind. Lesson 9: The Italian Renaissance Learning Targets for Students: I can identify Florence as the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance I can understand that powerful merchant families now commissioned art along with aristocratic, royal and church patrons I can articulate the significant visual developments of Italian Renaissance painting and their long-range impact on Western art. I can comprehend that the Renaissance gave rise to the idea of artists as divinely inspired geniuses. I can explain that Mannerist artists shared an interest in expressive, highly personal compositions rather than in a unified style Lesson 10: Renaissance in the North Learning Targets for Students: I can discern the difference between the convincing realism of Northern Renaissance painting and the Classical allusions permeating Italian Renaissance art. I can understand that Northern Renaissance artists used ordinary objects as symbols to communicate religious meaning I can explain how the artistic medium of oil paint assisted Northern Renaissance artists in describing scenes in great detail I can comprehend that Renaissance architecture flourished in France while painting remained tied to the earlier International style I can articulate how Phillip II used the wealth of the Hapsburg Empire to build impressive monuments illustrating Spains growth as a significant world power. 4 Lesson 11: Baroque and Rococo Learning Targets for Students: I can understand how Rome briefly reemerged as the center of the Western art world during the Baroque period I can identify the church as the major art patron in Italy I can recognize the exuberant and emotional characteristics of the Baroque style I can comprehend the differences and similarities of Baroque art in Italy, Austria, Germany, France, Spain, Flanders and Holland I can articulate the contrast between the charming and ethereal Rococo art of the 18th century and its Baroque antecedents Lesson 12: Three Opposing Views Learning Targets for Students: I can define the 18th and early 19th centuries as a time of rapid change in Western Society I can understand that Neo-classicism, Romanticism and Realism rejected the frivolity of the Baroque and Rococo eras I can locate the birth of the severe Neo-classicism style in France I can describe how the emotionally charged Romantic style was a reaction against the cool Neo-classical manner I can comprehend how Realist artists strove to paint exactly what they perceived in the world around them I can articulate that the development of photography as an art form began in the 19th century Lesson 13: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism Learning Targets for Students: I can locate the heart of the avant-garde art world in France during the last quarter of the 19th century to the early 20th century I can understand how the Impressionists used light and color to describe pleasant, transitory scenes of middle-class life I can explain how the Impressionists introduced composition and design to Impressionist color and light I can comprehend how artists used personal styles to convey often desolate emotions and content, laying the foundation for the Expressionist movement Lesson 14: A Half-Century of Isms 5 Learning Targets for Students: I can understand how many unique and exciting art styles existed simultaneously in the first of half of the 20th century I can comprehend that the proliferation of Western avant-garde art movements reflects the mobility and self-searching attitude of its artists I can explore the evidence of abstraction and Expressionism in the multiple styles that flourished after 1900 Lesson 15: American Art 1900-1950 Learning Targets for Students: I can describe how art from the first part of the 20th century embodied the enormous energy and life that permeated America I can articulate the divergent but simultaneous explorations of Abstraction and Realism in the United States, despite the lack of strong public support. Lesson 16: Twentieth-Century Architecture Learning Targets for Students: I can explain how Modernist architects abandoned brick and wood, preferring to use steel, reinforced concrete and huge expanses of glass in their towering, boxlike edifices. I can understand that Post-Modern buildings merged multiple styles at once to produce fascinating and often amusing visual experiences. Lesson 17: Art from the Fifties to the Present Learning Targets for Students: I can identify new york City as the center of Western art after World War II I can comprehend the individual styles of the various abstract and representational movements that span the second half of the 20th century National Standards for the Arts: Understanding visual arts in relation to history and cultures Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work others Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others 6 Understanding and applying media, techniques and processes Using knowledge of structures and functions Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines Essential Questions: Why do people create art? What is the difference between functional and aesthetic art? How do we define art? Lesson Activities: Packet for each lesson is worth two points per completed worksheet. These will be given out at the beginning of each lesson and will be completed by students as we go through the chapter. Upon completion of each worksheet, we will go over it in class together. Students may use them on the lesson exam. After the packets have been thoroughly examined and discussed, students will outline the lesson. This outline may be used on the lesson exam. Lesson exam for each lesson (aka chapter) The packet, outline, and exam will be turned in together on the day of the exam At the end of chapter 3, students will look at the sculpture on page 66 Despair. They will write a poem from the point of view of the person depicted in this sculpture. They cannot write Haiku or a couplet. At the end of chapter 4, students will work in pairs to create a timeline of the non-Western Worlds development of art and culture. Course Activities: We will view additional materials on the Promethean board, videos Field trip? To a museum, play? Within financial means, create some artworks skits, dances, musical lyrics, visual art A&H students will have the opportunity to attend the Lexington Childrens Theatres play presentation of Edgar Allan Poe on October 28, 2011. There will be a comprehensive unit exam. Students may use their notes and the book on this unit exam. Re-teaching activity: if students did not complete the entire packet for any chapter, those will be given back and students are to finish them.

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