Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chaoby Yuen Ren Chao; Anwar S. Dil

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  • Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao by Yuen Ren Chao; Anwar S. DilReview by: Alvin P. CohenJournal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 97, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1977), p. 410Published by: American Oriental SocietyStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/600871 .Accessed: 12/06/2014 21:09

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  • Journal of the American Oriental Society 97.3 (1977) Journal of the American Oriental Society 97.3 (1977) Journal of the American Oriental Society 97.3 (1977) Journal of the American Oriental Society 97.3 (1977) Journal of the American Oriental Society 97.3 (1977) Journal of the American Oriental Society 97.3 (1977)

    Writings on Taoism and folk religion are scattered

    among numerous (and often very obscure) sources and

    truly constitute a bibliographic nightmare. In his

    attempt to be "comprehensive," Thompson has searched thru an enormous number of sources and produced a very thorough work on material through 1970. In a few years he

    plans to produce an updated/sequel volume covering the writings of more recent years. Until then, my own small bibliography on Chinese folk religion (Journal of the American Academy of Religion. 43,2 [1975], 238-265), published after this volume had already gone to press, is still useful for post-1970 materials and some of the

    very few earlier works missed by Thompson. My only complaint about this book is more typographi-

    cal. With the exception of abbreviations and the initial words of book, article, and journal titles, capital letters are seldom used in an entry following the author's name. While this may be typographically attractive, it makes scanning awkward and thereby slows down the use of the bibliography. For example, in trying to find the name of A. Reville (without capital letters) buried inside an entry on page 6L, I had to slowly read through the entire column after scanning failed to reveal the name to my eye. I hope Thompson will reconsider this lack of

    capital letters in his sequel volume.

    Compiling a bibliography is an arduous task, especially when there is little precedent to build upon. We owe both gratitude and congratulations to Professor Thomp- son for this excellent work which will do much to advance the study of Chinese religion.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The First Radiocarbon Dates from China. By NOEL BARNARD. Pp. xvii + 94. Monographs on Far Eastern History, 8. Canberra: AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PRESS. Revised and enlarged, 1975. $A5.95 paper.

    The first edition of this volume (published in 1972) comprised a compilation of two sets of radiocarbon (C-14) data which were first reported in Chinese publica- tions. In the present volume a third set of data is added and some errors in the first edition are corrected. These data all pertain to archaeological artifacts unearthed in China. The author discusses the reliability of the radiocarbon dates and makes comparisons with dates derived from brislecone-pine calibrations. There is still much uncertainty in radiocarbon dating and the author strongly urges his readers to use the dates in this volume with great caution.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSE'rTS, AMHERST

    Writings on Taoism and folk religion are scattered

    among numerous (and often very obscure) sources and

    truly constitute a bibliographic nightmare. In his

    attempt to be "comprehensive," Thompson has searched thru an enormous number of sources and produced a very thorough work on material through 1970. In a few years he

    plans to produce an updated/sequel volume covering the writings of more recent years. Until then, my own small bibliography on Chinese folk religion (Journal of the American Academy of Religion. 43,2 [1975], 238-265), published after this volume had already gone to press, is still useful for post-1970 materials and some of the

    very few earlier works missed by Thompson. My only complaint about this book is more typographi-

    cal. With the exception of abbreviations and the initial words of book, article, and journal titles, capital letters are seldom used in an entry following the author's name. While this may be typographically attractive, it makes scanning awkward and thereby slows down the use of the bibliography. For example, in trying to find the name of A. Reville (without capital letters) buried inside an entry on page 6L, I had to slowly read through the entire column after scanning failed to reveal the name to my eye. I hope Thompson will reconsider this lack of

    capital letters in his sequel volume.

    Compiling a bibliography is an arduous task, especially when there is little precedent to build upon. We owe both gratitude and congratulations to Professor Thomp- son for this excellent work which will do much to advance the study of Chinese religion.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The First Radiocarbon Dates from China. By NOEL BARNARD. Pp. xvii + 94. Monographs on Far Eastern History, 8. Canberra: AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PRESS. Revised and enlarged, 1975. $A5.95 paper.

    The first edition of this volume (published in 1972) comprised a compilation of two sets of radiocarbon (C-14) data which were first reported in Chinese publica- tions. In the present volume a third set of data is added and some errors in the first edition are corrected. These data all pertain to archaeological artifacts unearthed in China. The author discusses the reliability of the radiocarbon dates and makes comparisons with dates derived from brislecone-pine calibrations. There is still much uncertainty in radiocarbon dating and the author strongly urges his readers to use the dates in this volume with great caution.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSE'rTS, AMHERST

    Writings on Taoism and folk religion are scattered

    among numerous (and often very obscure) sources and

    truly constitute a bibliographic nightmare. In his

    attempt to be "comprehensive," Thompson has searched thru an enormous number of sources and produced a very thorough work on material through 1970. In a few years he

    plans to produce an updated/sequel volume covering the writings of more recent years. Until then, my own small bibliography on Chinese folk religion (Journal of the American Academy of Religion. 43,2 [1975], 238-265), published after this volume had already gone to press, is still useful for post-1970 materials and some of the

    very few earlier works missed by Thompson. My only complaint about this book is more typographi-

    cal. With the exception of abbreviations and the initial words of book, article, and journal titles, capital letters are seldom used in an entry following the author's name. While this may be typographically attractive, it makes scanning awkward and thereby slows down the use of the bibliography. For example, in trying to find the name of A. Reville (without capital letters) buried inside an entry on page 6L, I had to slowly read through the entire column after scanning failed to reveal the name to my eye. I hope Thompson will reconsider this lack of

    capital letters in his sequel volume.

    Compiling a bibliography is an arduous task, especially when there is little precedent to build upon. We owe both gratitude and congratulations to Professor Thomp- son for this excellent work which will do much to advance the study of Chinese religion.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The First Radiocarbon Dates from China. By NOEL BARNARD. Pp. xvii + 94. Monographs on Far Eastern History, 8. Canberra: AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PRESS. Revised and enlarged, 1975. $A5.95 paper.

    The first edition of this volume (published in 1972) comprised a compilation of two sets of radiocarbon (C-14) data which were first reported in Chinese publica- tions. In the present volume a third set of data is added and some errors in the first edition are corrected. These data all pertain to archaeological artifacts unearthed in China. The author discusses the reliability of the radiocarbon dates and makes comparisons with dates derived from brislecone-pine calibrations. There is still much uncertainty in radiocarbon dating and the author strongly urges his readers to use the dates in this volume with great caution.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSE'rTS, AMHERST

    Writings on Taoism and folk religion are scattered

    among numerous (and often very obscure) sources and

    truly constitute a bibliographic nightmare. In his

    attempt to be "comprehensive," Thompson has searched thru an enormous number of sources and produced a very thorough work on material through 1970. In a few years he

    plans to produce an updated/sequel volume covering the writings of more recent years. Until then, my own small bibliography on Chinese folk religion (Journal of the American Academy of Religion. 43,2 [1975], 238-265), published after this volume had already gone to press, is still useful for post-1970 materials and some of the

    very few earlier works missed by Thompson. My only complaint about this book is more typographi-

    cal. With the exception of abbreviations and the initial words of book, article, and journal titles, capital letters are seldom used in an entry following the author's name. While this may be typographically attractive, it makes scanning awkward and thereby slows down the use of the bibliography. For example, in trying to find the name of A. Reville (without capital letters) buried inside an entry on page 6L, I had to slowly read through the entire column after scanning failed to reveal the name to my eye. I hope Thompson will reconsider this lack of

    capital letters in his sequel volume.

    Compiling a bibliography is an arduous task, especially when there is little precedent to build upon. We owe both gratitude and congratulations to Professor Thomp- son for this excellent work which will do much to advance the study of Chinese religion.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The First Radiocarbon Dates from China. By NOEL BARNARD. Pp. xvii + 94. Monographs on Far Eastern History, 8. Canberra: AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PRESS. Revised and enlarged, 1975. $A5.95 paper.

    The first edition of this volume (published in 1972) comprised a compilation of two sets of radiocarbon (C-14) data which were first reported in Chinese publica- tions. In the present volume a third set of data is added and some errors in the first edition are corrected. These data all pertain to archaeological artifacts unearthed in China. The author discusses the reliability of the radiocarbon dates and makes comparisons with dates derived from brislecone-pine calibrations. There is still much uncertainty in radiocarbon dating and the author strongly urges his readers to use the dates in this volume with great caution.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSE'rTS, AMHERST

    Writings on Taoism and folk religion are scattered

    among numerous (and often very obscure) sources and

    truly constitute a bibliographic nightmare. In his

    attempt to be "comprehensive," Thompson has searched thru an enormous number of sources and produced a very thorough work on material through 1970. In a few years he

    plans to produce an updated/sequel volume covering the writings of more recent years. Until then, my own small bibliography on Chinese folk religion (Journal of the American Academy of Religion. 43,2 [1975], 238-265), published after this volume had already gone to press, is still useful for post-1970 materials and some of the

    very few earlier works missed by Thompson. My only complaint about this book is more typographi-

    cal. With the exception of abbreviations and the initial words of book, article, and journal titles, capital letters are seldom used in an entry following the author's name. While this may be typographically attractive, it makes scanning awkward and thereby slows down the use of the bibliography. For example, in trying to find the name of A. Reville (without capital letters) buried inside an entry on page 6L, I had to slowly read through the entire column after scanning failed to reveal the name to my eye. I hope Thompson will reconsider this lack of

    capital letters in his sequel volume.

    Compiling a bibliography is an arduous task, especially when there is little precedent to build upon. We owe both gratitude and congratulations to Professor Thomp- son for this excellent work which will do much to advance the study of Chinese religion.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The First Radiocarbon Dates from China. By NOEL BARNARD. Pp. xvii + 94. Monographs on Far Eastern History, 8. Canberra: AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PRESS. Revised and enlarged, 1975. $A5.95 paper.

    The first edition of this volume (published in 1972) comprised a compilation of two sets of radiocarbon (C-14) data which were first reported in Chinese publica- tions. In the present volume a third set of data is added and some errors in the first edition are corrected. These data all pertain to archaeological artifacts unearthed in China. The author discusses the reliability of the radiocarbon dates and makes comparisons with dates derived from brislecone-pine calibrations. There is still much uncertainty in radiocarbon dating and the author strongly urges his readers to use the dates in this volume with great caution.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSE'rTS, AMHERST

    Writings on Taoism and folk religion are scattered

    among numerous (and often very obscure) sources and

    truly constitute a bibliographic nightmare. In his

    attempt to be "comprehensive," Thompson has searched thru an enormous number of sources and produced a very thorough work on material through 1970. In a few years he

    plans to produce an updated/sequel volume covering the writings of more recent years. Until then, my own small bibliography on Chinese folk religion (Journal of the American Academy of Religion. 43,2 [1975], 238-265), published after this volume had already gone to press, is still useful for post-1970 materials and some of the

    very few earlier works missed by Thompson. My only complaint about this book is more typographi-

    cal. With the exception of abbreviations and the initial words of book, article, and journal titles, capital letters are seldom used in an entry following the author's name. While this may be typographically attractive, it makes scanning awkward and thereby slows down the use of the bibliography. For example, in trying to find the name of A. Reville (without capital letters) buried inside an entry on page 6L, I had to slowly read through the entire column after scanning failed to reveal the name to my eye. I hope Thompson will reconsider this lack of

    capital letters in his sequel volume.

    Compiling a bibliography is an arduous task, especially when there is little precedent to build upon. We owe both gratitude and congratulations to Professor Thomp- son for this excellent work which will do much to advance the study of Chinese religion.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The First Radiocarbon Dates from China. By NOEL BARNARD. Pp. xvii + 94. Monographs on Far Eastern History, 8. Canberra: AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY PRESS. Revised and enlarged, 1975. $A5.95 paper.

    The first edition of this volume (published in 1972) comprised a compilation of two sets of radiocarbon (C-14) data which were first reported in Chinese publica- tions. In the present volume a third set of data is added and some errors in the first edition are corrected. These data all pertain to archaeological artifacts unearthed in China. The author discusses the reliability of the radiocarbon dates and makes comparisons with dates derived from brislecone-pine calibrations. There is still much uncertainty in radiocarbon dating and the author strongly urges his readers to use the dates in this volume with great caution.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSE'rTS, AMHERST

    Mencius. Translated with an introduction by D.C. LAU. Pp. 280. Baltimore: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.95 paper.

    Reprint of the edition first published in 1970. ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETrS, AMHERST

    Prisoner of Mao. By BAO RUO-WANG (JEAN PASQUALINI) and RUDOLPH CHELMINSKI. Pp. 326. New York: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.50 paper.

    Paperback reprint of the edition first published in 1973

    by Coward, McCann and Geohegan, Inc., New York ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao. Selected and introduced by ANWAR S. DIL.

    Pp. xv + 415. Stanford: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1976. $13.50.

    The extraordinary scope of Professor Chao's intellect and talents is very well known. This volume deals with

    only one major aspect of his research and publication. The text comprises twenty-six articles, twenty-four

    of which were published during the period 1943-1976

    (three of the latest essays are being published simul-

    taneously elsewhere), plus two hitherto unpublished essays: a major article entitled "A Preliminary Sketch of General Chinese" (in which is proposed a syllabary of 2,082 syllables to function as "a representative part of the Chinese langage [and] as a convenient basis for the study and use of the language as a whole"); a very short essay, "The Phonology and Grammar of 'Skipants' in Chinese." The articles are divided into four categories: I. Chinese Language and Dialects: Divergence and Uni- fication; II. Interlingual Perspectives; III. Philosophical Perspectives; IV. Structural Perspectives. At the end is a brief Postscript by Professor Chao, along with his very extensive bibliography covering the years 1915-1976, which lists his musical compositions, translations, Green Letters, as well as his numerous scholarly papers.

    We are in debt to Dr. Dil for bringing these papers together into a single convenient and attractive volume.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The Making of China: Main Themes in Premodern Chinese History. Edited by CHUN-SHU CHANG. Pp. xiv + 347. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: PRENTICE-HALL. 1975.

    This book is a collection of previously published writings by various well-known scholars in several fields

    Mencius. Translated with an introduction by D.C. LAU. Pp. 280. Baltimore: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.95 paper.

    Reprint of the edition first published in 1970. ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETrS, AMHERST

    Prisoner of Mao. By BAO RUO-WANG (JEAN PASQUALINI) and RUDOLPH CHELMINSKI. Pp. 326. New York: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.50 paper.

    Paperback reprint of the edition first published in 1973

    by Coward, McCann and Geohegan, Inc., New York ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao. Selected and introduced by ANWAR S. DIL.

    Pp. xv + 415. Stanford: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1976. $13.50.

    The extraordinary scope of Professor Chao's intellect and talents is very well known. This volume deals with

    only one major aspect of his research and publication. The text comprises twenty-six articles, twenty-four

    of which were published during the period 1943-1976

    (three of the latest essays are being published simul-

    taneously elsewhere), plus two hitherto unpublished essays: a major article entitled "A Preliminary Sketch of General Chinese" (in which is proposed a syllabary of 2,082 syllables to function as "a representative part of the Chinese langage [and] as a convenient basis for the study and use of the language as a whole"); a very short essay, "The Phonology and Grammar of 'Skipants' in Chinese." The articles are divided into four categories: I. Chinese Language and Dialects: Divergence and Uni- fication; II. Interlingual Perspectives; III. Philosophical Perspectives; IV. Structural Perspectives. At the end is a brief Postscript by Professor Chao, along with his very extensive bibliography covering the years 1915-1976, which lists his musical compositions, translations, Green Letters, as well as his numerous scholarly papers.

    We are in debt to Dr. Dil for bringing these papers together into a single convenient and attractive volume.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The Making of China: Main Themes in Premodern Chinese History. Edited by CHUN-SHU CHANG. Pp. xiv + 347. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: PRENTICE-HALL. 1975.

    This book is a collection of previously published writings by various well-known scholars in several fields

    Mencius. Translated with an introduction by D.C. LAU. Pp. 280. Baltimore: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.95 paper.

    Reprint of the edition first published in 1970. ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETrS, AMHERST

    Prisoner of Mao. By BAO RUO-WANG (JEAN PASQUALINI) and RUDOLPH CHELMINSKI. Pp. 326. New York: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.50 paper.

    Paperback reprint of the edition first published in 1973

    by Coward, McCann and Geohegan, Inc., New York ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao. Selected and introduced by ANWAR S. DIL.

    Pp. xv + 415. Stanford: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1976. $13.50.

    The extraordinary scope of Professor Chao's intellect and talents is very well known. This volume deals with

    only one major aspect of his research and publication. The text comprises twenty-six articles, twenty-four

    of which were published during the period 1943-1976

    (three of the latest essays are being published simul-

    taneously elsewhere), plus two hitherto unpublished essays: a major article entitled "A Preliminary Sketch of General Chinese" (in which is proposed a syllabary of 2,082 syllables to function as "a representative part of the Chinese langage [and] as a convenient basis for the study and use of the language as a whole"); a very short essay, "The Phonology and Grammar of 'Skipants' in Chinese." The articles are divided into four categories: I. Chinese Language and Dialects: Divergence and Uni- fication; II. Interlingual Perspectives; III. Philosophical Perspectives; IV. Structural Perspectives. At the end is a brief Postscript by Professor Chao, along with his very extensive bibliography covering the years 1915-1976, which lists his musical compositions, translations, Green Letters, as well as his numerous scholarly papers.

    We are in debt to Dr. Dil for bringing these papers together into a single convenient and attractive volume.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The Making of China: Main Themes in Premodern Chinese History. Edited by CHUN-SHU CHANG. Pp. xiv + 347. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: PRENTICE-HALL. 1975.

    This book is a collection of previously published writings by various well-known scholars in several fields

    Mencius. Translated with an introduction by D.C. LAU. Pp. 280. Baltimore: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.95 paper.

    Reprint of the edition first published in 1970. ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETrS, AMHERST

    Prisoner of Mao. By BAO RUO-WANG (JEAN PASQUALINI) and RUDOLPH CHELMINSKI. Pp. 326. New York: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.50 paper.

    Paperback reprint of the edition first published in 1973

    by Coward, McCann and Geohegan, Inc., New York ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao. Selected and introduced by ANWAR S. DIL.

    Pp. xv + 415. Stanford: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1976. $13.50.

    The extraordinary scope of Professor Chao's intellect and talents is very well known. This volume deals with

    only one major aspect of his research and publication. The text comprises twenty-six articles, twenty-four

    of which were published during the period 1943-1976

    (three of the latest essays are being published simul-

    taneously elsewhere), plus two hitherto unpublished essays: a major article entitled "A Preliminary Sketch of General Chinese" (in which is proposed a syllabary of 2,082 syllables to function as "a representative part of the Chinese langage [and] as a convenient basis for the study and use of the language as a whole"); a very short essay, "The Phonology and Grammar of 'Skipants' in Chinese." The articles are divided into four categories: I. Chinese Language and Dialects: Divergence and Uni- fication; II. Interlingual Perspectives; III. Philosophical Perspectives; IV. Structural Perspectives. At the end is a brief Postscript by Professor Chao, along with his very extensive bibliography covering the years 1915-1976, which lists his musical compositions, translations, Green Letters, as well as his numerous scholarly papers.

    We are in debt to Dr. Dil for bringing these papers together into a single convenient and attractive volume.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The Making of China: Main Themes in Premodern Chinese History. Edited by CHUN-SHU CHANG. Pp. xiv + 347. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: PRENTICE-HALL. 1975.

    This book is a collection of previously published writings by various well-known scholars in several fields

    Mencius. Translated with an introduction by D.C. LAU. Pp. 280. Baltimore: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.95 paper.

    Reprint of the edition first published in 1970. ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETrS, AMHERST

    Prisoner of Mao. By BAO RUO-WANG (JEAN PASQUALINI) and RUDOLPH CHELMINSKI. Pp. 326. New York: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.50 paper.

    Paperback reprint of the edition first published in 1973

    by Coward, McCann and Geohegan, Inc., New York ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao. Selected and introduced by ANWAR S. DIL.

    Pp. xv + 415. Stanford: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1976. $13.50.

    The extraordinary scope of Professor Chao's intellect and talents is very well known. This volume deals with

    only one major aspect of his research and publication. The text comprises twenty-six articles, twenty-four

    of which were published during the period 1943-1976

    (three of the latest essays are being published simul-

    taneously elsewhere), plus two hitherto unpublished essays: a major article entitled "A Preliminary Sketch of General Chinese" (in which is proposed a syllabary of 2,082 syllables to function as "a representative part of the Chinese langage [and] as a convenient basis for the study and use of the language as a whole"); a very short essay, "The Phonology and Grammar of 'Skipants' in Chinese." The articles are divided into four categories: I. Chinese Language and Dialects: Divergence and Uni- fication; II. Interlingual Perspectives; III. Philosophical Perspectives; IV. Structural Perspectives. At the end is a brief Postscript by Professor Chao, along with his very extensive bibliography covering the years 1915-1976, which lists his musical compositions, translations, Green Letters, as well as his numerous scholarly papers.

    We are in debt to Dr. Dil for bringing these papers together into a single convenient and attractive volume.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The Making of China: Main Themes in Premodern Chinese History. Edited by CHUN-SHU CHANG. Pp. xiv + 347. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: PRENTICE-HALL. 1975.

    This book is a collection of previously published writings by various well-known scholars in several fields

    Mencius. Translated with an introduction by D.C. LAU. Pp. 280. Baltimore: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.95 paper.

    Reprint of the edition first published in 1970. ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETrS, AMHERST

    Prisoner of Mao. By BAO RUO-WANG (JEAN PASQUALINI) and RUDOLPH CHELMINSKI. Pp. 326. New York: PENGUIN BOOKS. 1976. $2.50 paper.

    Paperback reprint of the edition first published in 1973

    by Coward, McCann and Geohegan, Inc., New York ALVIN P. COHEN

    UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    Aspects of Chinese Sociolinguistics: Essays by Yuen Ren Chao. Selected and introduced by ANWAR S. DIL.

    Pp. xv + 415. Stanford: STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1976. $13.50.

    The extraordinary scope of Professor Chao's intellect and talents is very well known. This volume deals with

    only one major aspect of his research and publication. The text comprises twenty-six articles, twenty-four

    of which were published during the period 1943-1976

    (three of the latest essays are being published simul-

    taneously elsewhere), plus two hitherto unpublished essays: a major article entitled "A Preliminary Sketch of General Chinese" (in which is proposed a syllabary of 2,082 syllables to function as "a representative part of the Chinese langage [and] as a convenient basis for the study and use of the language as a whole"); a very short essay, "The Phonology and Grammar of 'Skipants' in Chinese." The articles are divided into four categories: I. Chinese Language and Dialects: Divergence and Uni- fication; II. Interlingual Perspectives; III. Philosophical Perspectives; IV. Structural Perspectives. At the end is a brief Postscript by Professor Chao, along with his very extensive bibliography covering the years 1915-1976, which lists his musical compositions, translations, Green Letters, as well as his numerous scholarly papers.

    We are in debt to Dr. Dil for bringing these papers together into a single convenient and attractive volume.

    ALVIN P. COHEN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    The Making of China: Main Themes in Premodern Chinese History. Edited by CHUN-SHU CHANG. Pp. xiv + 347. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: PRENTICE-HALL. 1975.

    This book is a collection of previously published writings by various well-known scholars in several fields

    410 410 410 410 410 410

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