8th Grade Curriculum Map - St Lucie Public K-12 grade-specific standards define end-of-year expectations ... In grade 8, the Common Core ... The modules reflect the balance of informational texts

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  • English Language Arts 8th Grade

    Curriculum Map

    Purpose of Curriculum Map

    The English Language Arts Curriculum Map is a tool for organizing what students should know and be able to do in literacy each year. Each document lists the main concepts and skills for each grade level of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. As you can imagine, a two- dimensional map cannot capture the rich, multi-dimensional curriculum we teach. In fact, the ELA Common Core State Standards themselves define what is most essential, they do not describe all that can or should be taught. Nonetheless, the documents serve as a tool that can guide teachers to plan and pace instructional experiences in order to ensure a guaranteed and viable curriculum for all students.

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

    The K-12 grade-specific standards define end-of-year expectations

    and a cumulative progression designed to enable students to meet

    college and career readiness expectations no later than the end of

    high school. Students advancing through the grades are expected to

    meet each years grade specific standards, retain or further develop

    skills and understanding mastered in preceding grades.

    Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy

    in History/Social Studies, Science, Technical Subjects

    http://www.cpalms.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse797.aspxhttp://www.cpalms.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse797.aspxhttp://www.cpalms.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse797.aspxhttp://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacyhttp://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacyhttp://www.stlucieschools.org/http://www.stlucieschools.org/

  • Organization and Use of the Curriculum Map

    The ELA Curriculum Map is organized into 3 sections: Systematic &

    Explicit Literacy Instruction, Writing and Language Development, and

    Research Projects. The standards are organized within the sections in

    order to serve as a guide for teaching, planning, and pacing focused

    on the selected standards in each quarter. Each section includes a

    focus on the strands of the ELA CCSS. The organization of the ELA

    CCSS Strands within the SLPS Curriculum Map is illustrated below:

    Systematic & Explicit Literacy Instruction

    Writing and Language

    Development

    Research Projects

    *Reading Literature (RL.1-10) *Reading Informational Text (RI.1-10) *Language (L.4-6) *Speaking and Listening (SL.1-3)

    * Writing (W.1-6 & W.9-10) *Language (L.1-3)

    *Writing (W.1-2 & W.4-9) *Speaking and Listening (SL.4-6)

    While the Standards and the Curriculum Map are divided into these

    sections for conceptual clarity, the processes are closely connected.

    The Standards delineate specific expectations within these strands;

    each need not be a separate focus for instruction and assessment.

    Often several standards can be addressed by a single rich task.

    Florida Coding Schema

    Scales & Checklists

    Scales are utilized as instructional resources in order to monitor and

    track student progress and mastery of the ELA Common Core State

    Standards. Scales are matched to the instructional target identified by

    the teacher that is most closely aligned to the content of the text.

    Scales may be posted/provided for a unit, week, or daily instruction

    depending on data and learning target.

    Grade 8 English Language Arts Scales

    Checklists are utilized as instructional resources in order to monitor

    and track student progress and mastery of the ELA Common Core

    State Standards. Checklists are located in the instructional resources

    sections of Foundational Skills, Language, and Speaking & Listening.

    Grade 8 English Language Arts Checklists

    http://www.stlucie.k12.fl.us/curriculum/ELA/8RLRI11.pdfhttp://www.stlucie.k12.fl.us/curriculum/ELA/ELA08.html

  • Grade 8 English Language Arts Scope and Sequence PARCC Grade 8 Model Content Framework

    In grade 8, the Common Core State Standards call for students to grapple with high-

    quality, complex nonfiction texts and great works of literature. Starting in grade 8,

    the focus of informational texts begins to shift from narrative to exposition.

    Students who leave grade 8 know how to cite the textual evidence that most

    strongly supports an analysis or critique. Students in grade 8 are primed to question

    an authors assumptions and assess the accuracy of his or her claims, and by the

    end of grade 8, they are adept at reading closely and uncovering evidence to use in

    their own writing. Students can, for instance, analyze in writing two or more texts

    that provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify whether the

    disagreement is over facts or interpretation. They can analyze how point of view

    can be manipulated to create specific effects such as dramatic irony and investigate

    how particular passages within a text connect to one another to advance the plot,

    reveal a character, or highlight an idea.

    Students are to draw explicitly on their reading and research in discussions. They

    respond to questions constructively by offering up relevant evidence, observations,

    and ideas. By grade 8, students have developed a rich vocabulary of academic

    words, which they use to speak and write with more precision.

    In addition, grade 8 students write with increasing sophistication, focusing on

    organizing ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; choosing

    relevant facts well; and using varied transitions to clarify or show the relationships

    among elements. Students should be able to distinguish their claims from alternate

    or opposing claims and use words and phrases to clarify the relationships and

    transitions among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

    The Grade 8 Content Framework outlines the guiding principles/practices of integrated literacy.

    Systematic & Explicit Literacy Instruction

    Reading Complex Text

    Cite Evidence

    RI.1 & RL.1

    Analyze Content RL.2-9 & RI.2.9

    Study & Apply Vocabulary

    L.4-6

    Conduct Discussions SL.1-3

    Reading Foundational Skills

    Writing & Language Development

    Writing to Texts W.1-6 & W.9-10

    Routine Writing Develop & Convey

    Understanding

    4-6 Analyses Focus on Opinions & Informing/ Explaning

    1-2 Narratives Convey Experiences,

    Events, and/or Procedures

    Study and Apply Grammar

    Research Projects

    Integrate Knowledge from

    Sources when Composing

    Reporting Findings

    SL.4-6

    Grade 8 Content Framework

    http://www.parcconline.org/mcf/english-language-artsliteracy/parcc-model-content-framework-elaliteracy-grade-8

  • Explicit Literacy Instruction Utilizing Grade Level Complex Text

    Systematic & Explicit LIteracy Instruction

    Read Complex Text

    Cite Evidence

    Analyze Content

    Conduct Discussions

    Study and Apply

    Vocabulary When designing learning experiences for

    students, grade-

    level complex text

    should be utilized

    where students are

    to cite evidence

    when analyzing

    content and

    participating in

    discussions about

    text.

    Vocabulary is chosen in

    order to develop

    students use and

    understanding of grade

    appropriate terms.

  • Systematic & Explicit Literacy Instruction Reading Complex Texts:

    Exposing students to grade-level texts of appropriate complexity lies at the heart of ELA CCSS. The modules reflect the balance of informational texts (literary nonfiction in ELA classes) and literature that students are expected to read. Fulfilling the ELA standards for grades 6-12 requires much greater attention to a specific category of informational text literary nonfiction than has been traditionally taught. Because the ELA classroom must focus on literature (stories, drama, and poetry) as well as literary nonfiction, a great deal of informational reading in grades 6-12 must take place in other classes to meet the demands of the standards.

    LACC.8.RL.4.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 68 text complexity band independently and proficiently. LACC.8.RI.4.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 68 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

    Three to five short texts from across the curriculum:

    Educators can create coherence within the curriculum as a whole by choosing short texts to complement the extended text described, by focusing instruction on similar standards and skills across multiple genres, and by choosing informational texts that build the background knowledge needed to read and comprehend other texts students will study. (Shorter texts can be chosen from Elements of Literature, Science Fusion, DBQ, Appendix B, Etc.)

    One extended text:

    This should be an extended, full-length work of literature (such as a novel or a play) or longer informational text. Like the others, this text would be aligned with the

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