YOSEMITE PHOTOGRAPHY: SPRING LIGHT WHAT TO ?· YOSEMITE PHOTOGRAPHY: SPRING LIGHT ... and teaching here…

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  • YOSEMITE PHOTOGRAPHY: SPRING LIGHT

    WHAT TO WEAR:

    Workshops continue rain or shine, so come prepared for any weather with layered clothing and

    waterproof outerwear, and be sure to dress appropriately for the season. Not all trails are not

    paved; you will be walking over varying conditions. It will be cold in the mornings and evenings

    but can warm up significantly during the day.

    Rain gear (just in case, even though we expect good weather a rain coat or poncho, an umbrella, and a plastic bag for the camera)

    Knit cap or ski cap and mittens for cool mornings

    Sunscreen, sun hat, and sunglasses for when it warms up during the day

    Fleece layers you can shed as it warms up

    EQUIPMENT & GEAR TO BRING:

    You are responsible for all your own food

    Day pack and/or fanny pack for carrying camera gear and/or camera bag for carrying gear on foot and by car

    Camera gear (see below for more specific recommendations on what - and what not - to bring for the outing)

    NOTE FROM THE INSTRUCTOR:

    WHO THIS TRIP IS FOR: Anyone who enjoys the natural world and photography. Field sessions will be geared toward

    novice and intermediate photographers; more advanced photographers are welcome, too. All

    walks will be easy-paced endeavors.

    THE INSTRUCTORS:

    An avid photographer and cyclist, DAVE WYMAN enjoys riding the mean streets of his home town, Los Angeles, when hes not out making photographs. Over the years, Daves

    images have appeared in magazines such as Outdoor Photographer, Cross-Country Ski,

    Sky and Telescope, and Outside. He is the author of three books, including Yosemite in

    Photographs and is working on a new book about nature photography. He created and

    conducted the Adventure Photography program for the University of Southern California,

    and he has conducted photography outings for the the Yosemite Conservancy since 1991.

  • KEN ROCKWELL has been photographing since he was five years old. He became serious by age 11, by which time he was already an accomplished and published aerial

    photographer. Today, as one of the world's most recognized photographic artists, Ken has

    won first and grand prizes in numerous competitions and juried exhibitions, including

    one at the Gallery at 777 in Los Angeles and another at the San Diego Natural History

    Museum. Ken is best known as the world's largest independent source of photography

    information, with as many as 5 million visitors to his free website, KenRockwell.com.

    Ken has been visiting Yosemite since 1987, and teaching here since 2006.

    WEATHER: Some of the best images are made in bad weather. If it rains during a significant portion of the

    weekend, well provide an alternate itinerary to keep us reasonably dry, whether it be in shuttle

    buses or cars, under the natural umbrellas created by oaks and pines, or meeting inside to look at

    photographs and talk about photography and life in general.

    WHAT WILL BE PROVIDED:

    Photography instructors

    Field sessions throughout the Valley via short walks; beyond the Valley, we will travel via cars

    Campground accommodations (optional indoor accommodations are available, too)

    PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT:

    You don't need to spend any money on equipment you don't already have. A basic digital camera

    will be fine. Those with 35mm cameras and medium format cameras are welcome, too. Two

    accessories: a tripod & cable release. These items will allow you to photograph in the early

    morning hours and into evening, including, if were up for it, some night sky photography. On

    the other hand, this is the trip to bring what we want if we have it: telephotos, super-wides,

    macro lenses, flash-guns, etc.

    Tripods can be rented from some camera shops, or the Ansel Adams Gallery in Yosemite Valley. Dave Wyman may also bring along a few extra tripods to loan out. If you have a

    question about what sort of tripod to bring, or where to purchase or rent one, contact the

    instructor; hell be happy to answer your questions.

    Tripods would need to be picked up on our arrival day, rather than on the official start day of the

    workshop.

    .

    FILM: Slide film will teach you more about exposure than print film, and is less expensive than

    print film. You can also make prints from your favorite slides, and/or digitize your film images.

    The instructors recommend Fuji slide film (Velvia), ISO 50. Other excellent films include the

    Kodaks Ektachromes. Print film is much easier to display than slide film, and is also an

    excellent choice for our workshop. ISO 100 to 400 are good film speeds.

    FILTERS: While filters arent necessary to successful photography (the instructors rarely use

    them), there are three good ones to know about. A polarizer will cut down glare, darken skies,

    and brighten clouds (some cameras require a circular polarizer, check your manual or ask at

  • your local camera shop). An 81B filter will help warm-up cool scenes photographed in the

    shade or on cloudy days (this is a filter for film photographers). A graduated neutral density filter

    will help even out bright and dark areas in some scenes.

    BATTERIES: Make sure you have enough battery power to keep your camera going for a full

    day.

    If you have questions, please feel free to call Kylie Chappell at Yosemite Conservancy at (209)

    379-2317 X 10 (kchappell@yosemiteconservancy.org)

    mailto:kchappell@yosemiteconservancy.org