writing feedback – technical skill vs. content

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Writing Feedback – Technical Skill vs. Content. Literacy Toolkit. HGIOS 5.2 – Teaching for Effective learning 5.4 – Assessment for Learning. Writing Feedback – Technical Skill vs. Content. Literacy Toolkit. Agenda Activity 1 – Introduction / Starter Activity (5 mins ) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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PowerPoint Presentation

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentHGIOS

5.2 Teaching for Effective learning5.4 Assessment for Learning

Literacy ToolkitThe notes section in each presentation is primarily for the facilitator, indicating additional requirements or information. Please go to the following link for further info.www.journeytoexcellence.org.uk/about/keydocuments/part3.asp

Writing Feedback Technical Skills vs. ContentThe objective of this PPT is to explore differing opinions which practitioners have regarding providing effective feedback within writing.

This PPT will address the following Quality Indicators from HGIOS 3

QI 5.2 Teaching for effective learning The learning climate and teaching approachesTeacher-pupil interaction including learners engagement Clarity and purposefulness of dialogue Judgements made in the course of teaching

QI 5.4 Assessment for learning Assessment approachesPlanning learning experiences and activitiesUse of assessment information to identify and plan future learningArrangements for recording and reporting1

Literacy ToolkitAgendaActivity 1 Introduction / Starter Activity (5 mins)Activity 2 Hows it going / feedback (10-20 mins)Activity 3 New Learning (25-40 mins)Activity 4 Personal Action Planning (10 mins)Activity 5 Summary of Learning (5 mins)

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentThis agenda is fixed and is the same for every presentation in the toolkit.

2

Literacy ToolkitActivity 1:Voice on the table

In a maximum of 45 seconds, share your response to the following:

Name a writer whose work you enjoyWhat impact does the writer have on you when you read their work?

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentTo start the session choose an activity which is non-judgemental and everyone can contribute.Think of something that happened in a lesson that made you smile. You have 30 seconds per teacher to tell the group what it is. No teacher can pass

The facilitator should model what is meant:e.g. Roald Dahl. When I read his work I feel like I am part of the story. He has a gift which allows me to relate to the characters within his work.

The role of the teachers when it is not their turn is active listening

You may use a stopwatch

Choose respondents-everyone must be involved in this activity

Max 5 Minutes for this activity3

Writing across Learning in St Hilarys Primary School

This clip looks at writing across learning in action. This includes:widening technical vocabulary through active spelling strategieschunking writing sessions to review and share as learners writesupporting all learners through the use of writing prompts, word banks, sentence starters and teacher/pupil, pupil/pupil intervention.

'Writing across Learning'

Literacy Toolkit

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentThe following video is from the Education Scotland website and can be accessed on http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/sharingpractice/w/writingacrosslearning/writing.asp?strReferringChannel=video&strReferringPageID=tcm:4-609635-64

The video details how St Hilarys Primary School have used writing across learning as an approach to improve both pupil standards and confidence when writing. The group should be given the opportunity to discuss How do we currently adopt a Writing across learning approach within our classroom practice? This question is to be posed by the facilitator pairs and trios should be given time to discuss.

5-10 minutes4

Literacy ToolkitActivity 2: Hows it going?

With a partner, using a piece of text created by a learner which you consider to be good writing, highlight where the learner has demonstrated technical accuracy.

Using a different colour, now highlight the striking moment in which where learners content demonstrates their flair for writing.

What makes a good piece of writing?

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentStaff, preferably working in year group/level stages, should have selected a piece of writing that they consider to be a good piece of writing. The facilitator, in advance, should ask participants to bring a piece of a pupils work, or alternatively the facilitator can provide a piece of striking writing.

In pairs/small groups, staff should highlight where the learner has succeeded in terms of both their content/technical ability.

The facilitator should then pose the following question, and collect responses from the pairs:

What makes a good piece of writing?

Participants may have varying ideas as to what makes a good piece of writing. During the feedback both technical accuracy and captivating content should be acknowledged, as this will be a preparatory discussion for the next task.

15 minutes5

Literacy ToolkitEffective Feedback

Given the responses to the last question, when providing feedback during writing, which is more important:

Feedback on content?Feedback on technical accuracy?

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentThe facilitator should place the participants in two groups. Each group should be given a side: content or technical accuracy. Given 5 minutes, the group should come up with supporting arguments which support their case.

The groups should then be given 2 minutes to present their case to the opposing group.

At the end of the discussion, as facilitator, at this point acknowledge the importance of both areas when providing feedback, if this did not crystallise during your discussion.

10-15 minutes6

Literacy ToolkitActivity 3:New Learning

You know it when you see it. It isnt that hard to tell whether a piece of writing is good or bad. You just have to read it. But things get more challenging if you have to explain why . . . Good writing has:

Ideas that are interesting and important. Organization that is logical and effective. Voice that is individual and appropriate. Word Choice that is specific and memorable. Sentence Fluency that is smooth and expressive. Conventions that are correct and communicative. Teaching That Makes Sense: What is Good Writing?

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentThe facilitator should share the work of Steve Peha, Teaching That Makes Sense. Steve has developed literacy support materials in America, using the 6 Traits of Writing as his stimulus.

Do staff agree with this statement?

Staff can follow up the work of Steve Peha, if they wish, by following the hyperlink at the end of the PowerPoint

5 minutes7

Literacy ToolkitChildren and young people will demonstrate their progress in writing though the degree of independence they show, the organisation and quality of their ideas, their skills in spelling, punctuation and grammar, the match of their writing to audience and the effectiveness of their use of language . . . Learners enthusiasm and motivation for using language will show in their growing use of different media and texts, their preferences in reading, their confidence in sharing experiences through talk and writing and in the ways they apply their skills in their learning and communicating.CfE: literacy across learning principles and practice

What similarities are there between the ideas voiced by Teaching That Makes Sense, and those above, within the CfE documentation?

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentThe facilitator should share the quote from the CfE: literacy across learning principles and practice paper

The following question should be asked, pairs should discuss and feedback responses:What similarities are there between the ideas voiced by Teaching That Makes Sense (previous slide), and those above, within the CfE documentation?

5-10 minutes8

Literacy ToolkitTo make progress pupils require effective feedback How can we ensure that learners are given effective feedback, using a balanced approach, which develop both their technical accuracy and content within their writing?

Writing Feedback Technical Skill vs. ContentThe facilitator should share the following with the group:Both Steve Peha (Teaching That Makes Sense) and the CfE literacy across learning principles and practice paper suggest that you need a balanced approach when delivering writing ensuring that both content and technical ability are developed in unison with one another.

Facilitator should then pose the question to the group:

To make progress pupils require effective feedback How can we ensure that learners are given effective feedback, using a balanced approach which develop both their technical accuracy and content within their writing?

At this point the facilitator should point out the use of formative strategies, such as Two stars and a wish

The responses should be heard from each of the pairs/groups. The facilitator can at this point share the ideas below encouraging staff to think about: How are we going to do this?Model texts which demonstrate the qualities of good writing as writers craft lessonsUse oral feedback during the writing process to identify next stepsIncorporate self and peer assessment into lessons, encouraging pupils to talk about the writing, justifying how their writing has the desired impact on their readerEncourage pupils to experiment with ambitious vocabulary, punctuation and structure, and provide them with the ability to analyse and identify their next steps for improvementCelebrate the success of learners developing a culture in which they feel confident to talk about their writingUse the assessment of learners work to plan further learning experiences which will enhance both content and technical accuracyTeach learners spelling and grammar using a mini